1 on 1 vs. group

by Melanie
(PA)

My son can complete any task if given the instructions one on one, but when he is in a group, and the whole group is given a task, he can't do it. He can't focus on listening to the instructions, and rushes through the project...

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Sep 07, 2009
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1 on 1 vs. group
by: Anonymous

My son has the same problem. I really started noticing it in first grade. It was hard for me to understand because he is a very smart child, but after his teacher got through explaining instruction to the whole class, it was as if he never heard her.

That same year he started little league and as the coach was talking to all the kids, my son was looking up at the clouds. He is now in football, and his coach was getting frustrated with him because he couldn't remember directions after they were explained to the whole group. I explained the situation to the coach and it was like a lightbulb when off in his head. He said when he looked right at my son while talking, my son would be right on the task. I think being in a group is a little over whelming for him him. It's almost like he gets lost in the crowd and just can't concentrate, but when he is taught one on one, he is just the opposite. He learns faster than the average kid.

Is it that the noise of the group is overwhelming and our kids just check out?

Aug 07, 2009
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INDIVIDUAL FM SYSTEM
by: Anonymous

IT IS CALLED AN individual FM SYSTEM. IN ILLINOIS THE SCHOOL IS RESPONSIBLE FOR SETTING THE CHILD UP WITH ONE. YOU CAN GO ON THE INTERNET AND SEARCH FOR INDIVIDUAL FM SYSTEM IF THE SCHOOL WILL NOT HELP. IF THE SCHOOL WILL ALLOW IT IT NEEDS TO BE PUT IN AN IEP.

May 05, 2009
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help with microphone/earpiece device
by: kristina

My son was diagnosed 3 years ago and his tactile/oral and vestibular symptoms have improved tremendously since starting OT. Like so many kids with this disorder, he is very bright and creative. His real challenge as a 7 year old in school is focusing on the teacher during lessons. One on one he does well, but cannot concentrate and attend to tasks in a class setting. The suggestion regarding the teachers microphone and an earpiece for the child was interesting. Does anyone know what this is called or where to get one. I have tries several catalogs, but can't find this.



Apr 20, 2009
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1 on 1
by: Carolyn

My son is 5 and sounds very much like yours. One on one he does well but in groups he does not do well. We had put him in soccer when he was 4 in hopes that his would help him. We made it through about 2 or 3 practices before deciding to pull him out. He just couldn't deal with the team effort. He wanted to do it his way and when he wasn't in the middle of it all he would sit down and play in the dirt.

We switched to TaeKwonDo because it is more individualized. His class has about 12 students and they do a lot of group activities. This too has been very difficult but we stuck with it and he is doing better. A lot depends on his disposition and motivation.

Apr 20, 2009
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that is sometimes the problem
by: Ericka Morgan

HI,
I just wanted to share, this is my son's problem as well. But as a special education teacher, I have noticed that this is a big problem when kids get into regular education classes! So much of learning takes place in group settings-and if the kids can't attend, it really does affect them.
I think that there are many reasons for getting kids services-and needing small group instruction is one of them!
hth, Ericka

Apr 20, 2009
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My son is the same
by: Charlene Ohio

My son is five years old and participates in weekly swimming classes at the YMCA. He has a hard time following directions wen the group is given a set of things to accomplish, but when he is given one on one instruction he responds wonderfully. I think it is because he has a hard time distinguishing what is important to listen to and what not to listen to in a group setting.

Apr 20, 2009
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Possible Help
by: Kim

A person at the school my son attends says they have a little microphone the teacher wears and a small headset for the child. That way the teacher can give directions and the child can listen as if the instructions are directed at him. It helps when sensory problems make the sounds run together and they are listening to the teacher plus all the other classroom sounds. I don't know if this would help, but it is something I have heard of.

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