Anonymous

My daughter (just turned 3) has many of the symptoms, but I am really confused because her reactions are not very severe. For example, she doesn't like getting her hair brushed, but she doesn't yell and scream. She just whines a bit and usually allows me to do it. It is the same with tooth brushing. She doesn't like wearing sox, but she will put them on if we are going out.


She had OT as an infant and was diagnosed with low muscle tone. She is a very fussy eater, often fatigued throughout the day, poor motor planning, unsure of herself in physical activity, is fun and bubbly at home, but sometimes has difficulty mixing with other kids outside. She also sometimes doesn't respond when people talk to her - almost like she doesn't hear. At other times, she is very alert.

She's not the happiest kid in the world, but she doesn't seem like she is suffering terribly (at least I pray she is not). Her behavior causes some stress in the family, but its not very bad. The house is just a little tense sometimes. The situation seems borderline in almost every area. Any ideas?

Thanks!



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Feb 09, 2009
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Mild SPD
by: Jessi

I've seen articles on this site about Mild SPD and how it's still important to treat it. So I would see about an evaluation by an OT for SPD. Also, there is a 'lethargic' type of SPD mentioned on this site as well where without the proper stimulation, it's difficult for these kids to have any energy.

With her having low muscle tone and not always having a lot of energy, I would think that could be a possibility. Anyway, I think it's always best to check it out because therapy can be very effective - I've learned that first hand with my son.

Feb 09, 2009
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helping
by: Ranjit

You should really feel lucky that you did notice it early and so it will be easy to manage. The most important thing is taking care of your kid. Spend time with her and try by yourself to help her becuase the kids are very good at learning and so most of the therapeutic parts depend on you and how you tackle it.

Feb 08, 2009
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sounds familiar
by: Anonymous

Your daughter sounds a lot like my son did at her age. Things seemed to get more extreme as he got older. By the time he was in Pre-K it seemed that there was a definite difference between my son and his peers.

We started OT last year but haven't really notice a change until this year (he's in K) due to major life changes this past 12 months(new baby sister, first big move in his life, new school, & new OT).

He is doing great at home but is still having issues transitioning in school and playing with peers. He seems very happy for the most part. OT has worked to give him more self confidence and skills. We are still working on helping him out to deal with school. He's not extreme as others, just needs a little help. We are doing a few things in addition to OT to see how it can help: sensory diet, omega3, & Therapeutic listening.
I hope this helps.

Feb 08, 2009
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Sounds mild
by: Anonymous

It sounds to me like she has a mild case of SPD just as my son does. They actually sound very similar. Is she still getting OT?

Feb 08, 2009
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Starting at 3
by: Anonymous

Age 3 is a good time to start. OT is the best thing to do. Can you buy some equipment for your rec room? (try IKEA toys)Or build a marshmallow bag out of old sheets and upholstery foam to smash and roll in? It's a long, slow journey. There is a book out for kids with SPD, called The Sensory Team Handbook. It's more for older kids, but the ideas are the same, if you can find it anywhere. Good luck!

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