Aversion to buttons

Has anyone encountered this problem and do you have any solutions or ways to lessen the annoyance caused by buttons.

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Apr 03, 2016
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Box of buttons
by: Lois C

I too have an aversion to buttons. I don't like touching them and while I could button a blouse, if a button falls off, I won't touch it.

As a kid my grandma had a button box and we kids would play with it. (Why I don't know...must have been easy to entertain) However, I don't know exactly what happened to cause this. All I know is that I would rather DIE than to put my hands in that old button box.

Mar 13, 2016
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Me Too
by: Anonymous

Hi,

I'm 46 year old male. I've had a a major aversion to buttons (and snaps) as long as I can remember. There was a dress code at the school i went to, but i would always run home and get out of my clothes as soon as possible. I am fortunate enough that I'm good enough at my job where I can get the offices I work at to accommodate my issue. As a compromise, I wear buttonless, short sleeve collared shirts. Does anyone here know where the best place to buy these from (or the best way to search the internet for them)? I buy dozens of them, but there's been a drought of them for the last several years, and the ones I have are starting to show significant wear.

Jan 15, 2016
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Born with it
by: EE

I have hated buttons for as long as I can remember. I also have other quirks that I haven't grown out of like eating vegetables. I hate it when people use buttons in craft. There is a button collage at work and I avoid looking at it when I walk pass. I also have a stack of unused duvet covers because they have buttons...

Oct 31, 2015
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Aversion to buttons and shorts
by: Anonymous

My daughter (almost 6) has terrible anxiety every time mentioning wearing shorts comes up. It used to be the same with buttons, although that is getting better. For my daughter, I really believe that it is not so much the buttons that she fears, but the feeling of being anxious.

Although I am not a psychologist, I have finished my undergraduate degree in psychology, and I work with children. I have found that getting her involved in the process of overcoming her fears has really helped. I have helped her to understand what anxiety is and what it does to the body (google it, very interesting). While she is calm (not in the middle of the anxiety) we have worked on ways to expose her gradually to the fear (eg buttons), so she owns the process.

For example, she has decided that next week she will have a go at wearing shorts that have no buttons, and that on her 6th birthday, she will try on a pair on with buttons. I would suggest you research about anxiety. Sometimes an anxiety attack can manifest like a tantrum in young children. The key is not to try to reason with them in this state (it is physically impossible to reason with someone when they are in a heightened emotional state). The key is not to scold the child, and never tell them to 'snap out of it'- this will just frustrate them even more (and disempower them). Get them to feel empowered that they are the 'boss of their body' and they are able to overcome their anxiety. Eg deep breaths, relaxing body etc.

My daughter now understands that it is not the object (i.e. shorts, button, whatever) that is causing her the bad feeling, but that it is the anxiety that her mind and body do not like, and that she has the agency to reduce this anxiety. It's worth looking into this area (of managing anxiety and exposure therapy) and seeking the help of a child psychologist if you think this aversion behaviour is a pattern within your child. For my daughter, we have overcome several 'fears' successfully (wouldn't wear hair in a ponytail, wouldn't wear shoes, wouldn't wear buttons etc.). They all follow the same pattern/connection with anxiety. For some of you, perhaps your child is similar, and these methods may work for you too. All the best!

Sep 16, 2013
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Aversion to buttons
by: Anonymous

At 63 years of age still hate them. ICan make me feel physically ill. Am now retired with college degree, happily married for over forty years and otherwise "normal". Have been this way since early childhood and have never known why I am so affected, but have managed to live with it. Have tried to "get over it", but still feel that they are somehow dirty, germ carriers. Noticed that the medical profession now wears scrubs that have no fasteners except for a draw string on pants, and claim they are more sanitary. I agree! I really dislike how designers think everyone loves them because they insist on putting them e wry where! Yuck! If your child is having this reaction please do not try to force them to accept them, work with them on finding items that are acceptable to them.

Nov 12, 2012
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My 14 year old gets angry from buttons
by: Anonymous

My 14 year old refuses to wear clothing with buttons, he doesn't even want us to say the word. Tonight he had to wear a white button down shirt and a tie for a band concert. He cried and got really angry at us for making him wear the shirt.

I am at a point where I don't know what to do to help him through these times. Is there a way for him to over come this?

For anyone who is affected by this, why is it that you don't want to wear clothing with buttons? Does it feel funny? I just want to understand better so I can help support him.

Thanks for any advice!

Feb 15, 2012
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41 year old who still hates buttons
by: Anonymous

I'm a 41 year old mother of 4. I have a college degree in elementary education and have been married to a physician for 18 years. I also hate buttons and have sensory issues. I have since I was little. My mom tried everything to "fix" this and nothing worked. I have obviously been able to be successful and this didn't hinder my life. It has become a running joke in my family and the kids even tease me about it :)

I can tell you that, at least for me, snaps are better than plastic buttons, metal rivets (like on jeans) are also better than plastic buttons. I don't mind the metal slide hook you can find on some pants. You might be able to replace regular buttons with some of these other options. Obviously, if you child has to wear a button up shirt this doesn't help. I can tell you that I can as an adult I can wear clothing with buttons if I have to, but I still don't like it. My mom joked I would get married in a zip up wedding dress. It helps if I don't have to see the buttons and big buttons are worse than small ones. If I have to wear a shirt with buttons, I will wear a soft t-shirt under it and that helps some.

My advice is:
1. Don't try to fix it. Accept it. Make it light-hearted if possible.
2. Accommodate when you can and give options if possible.
3. The older your child gets the more they will be able to compensate, and adapt.
4. Know that it might not every go away, but you can live a happy ,fulfilling life even if you hate buttons!

I hope this helps some....good luck!

Feb 09, 2012
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buttons
by: mj

my son - now six - wouldn't wear buttons from 2.5 y/old till starting kindergarten. he also only wore sweat pants - no zippers or hard cotton fabric -

i enrolled him in private kindergarten which required a uniform with buttons. we talked about it all spring and summer prior to starting kindergarten - he was able to wear the uniform - khaki pants, buttons and all.

we made a big deal out of the uniform when it arrived - trying it on - showing his grandparents etc... ultimately i think a little more maturity and the excitement of kindergarten overrode the button issue - and the fact that all the other kids were wearing the same thing allowed him to accept it ongoing?

he doesnt wear them outside of the uniform - i am relaxing on this issue - i think as he continues to mature this issue will eventually go away.

hope that helps?

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