Discipline

by tamara
(Flin Flon Mb, Canada)

How do I discipline my child who has sensory processing disorder?

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May 17, 2012
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help!!
by: Anonymous

I have a friend whose school age daughter has SPD. Now, when she is with us, sleeping over, playing etc, she shown NONE of the behavioral issues my friends report when their daughter is with them. I want to help my friend, and her daughters 'behaviors' are getting worse. My friend wants to cut her hours at work back and spend more time at home with her daughter thinking that this could help the behaviors. My friend also says time outs don't work and I don't know how they discipline their daughter. The daughter (who is my daughter's BFF) is a bright, active child and I'm at a loss as to what to say, or help if I can. Can anyone help?

Feb 03, 2010
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Time out for Sensory Processing Child
by: Hez

We have used Time Out with our 6 year old with Sensory Processing Disorder. We find this very effective as ofter his misbehavior is caused by sensory overload. Thus giving him time out in our hallway on the stair allows him a relatively sensory free space to calm down. We have been using this technique since he was 2 and he responds very well to this.

Also we used a reward chart to target challenging behaviour that we want to change. Such as he gets a star for sitting at the table and eating his dinner. If he achieves 5 stars a day he get a small reward (a penny) and at the weekend if he has got 35 stars he gets a bit treat such as a trip to soft play.

Hope this helps

Jan 29, 2010
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We need more info
by: NTFalls

What are the sensory issues you are dealing with and what behavior is the discipline meant to correct or alter. No advice about discipline should be given without knowing those specifics.

Jan 26, 2010
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sensory kids and discipline
by: Anonymous

I wrote an entire chapter on this in my book based on what I'd learned from years of talking to other moms of sensory kids online. In summary:
--Spanking is hugely problematic. Even if you believe in it, it's confusing for kids with an altered sense of touch who struggle with light touch/hard touch/appropriate touch. Kids have been known to act out to get that calming sensation of a firm spanking. That's counterproductive.
--1,2,3 magic works for some people, and it seems that's because it gives kids time to deal with the transition from the behavior/attitude they're in to a more acceptable behavior/attitude. However, some kids need even more help with that transition or get freaked out by the counting and feel anxious and pressured. It might be better to get rid of the counting and focus more on clear, consistent expectations and a limited number of warnings before you say "OK, you're not able to behave right now so you need some time out to pull yourself together."
--Time out. This really does work for just about every parent I've ever talked to but you have to modify it for your child. Some kids cannot handle being alone in time out, or need to be held/touched in a certain way. Time out should NOT be a "punishment" but a natural consequence, and they should be sent into time out without anger. Be the wise, calm parent who recognizes the child's need to "pull it together" with time in a nonstimulating environment (a dimly lit room can be helpful, also, do it in Mom and Dad's bedroom not their room that's filled with toys). End time out with a quiet conversation in which you determine whether they're ready to rejoin "civilization" (lol, my term). Our kids are unregulated and have difficulty noticing that they're getting anxious or stressed, and responding to that appropriately by taking it down a notch--a quiet timeout space helps them with this.
--Finally, kids will be manipulative because they want their needs met. At a certain point, you can reason with them, but YOU have to be clear on what your boundaries are. If you see something turning into an issue, like, do we stop to buy a juice at the store on the way home from the park? you have to step back and ask yourself, what's your rule on this? Because if sometimes it's yes, sometimes no, and it's arbitrary, you will always be battling about it.

--Nancy
www.sensorysmarts.com
www.sensorysmartnews.com

Jan 25, 2010
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not easy
by: Anonymous

We tried this with the dialogue, always respecting the discomfort that the children live. we need more info from the site. is not easy for parents, because their rigidity is part of the disorder.

Jan 24, 2010
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Just respect his "quirks"
by: Anonymous

First of all, you need to make a connection with that person. I have never disciplined my daughter (she has Asperger's with certain severe sensory issues). I accepted her quirks and went from there. What your child feels is real for him and they probably get "disciplined" enough at school, so just create a sensory friendly (for him) home and educate the school about it. Evaluate with OT. For him, that is real problem, put yourself in his shoes and go from there.

Jan 24, 2010
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Stephanie Whitt
by: Anonymous

The best thing I can say is,ONE DAY ONE MIN. At a time,Life is hard, we are given what we have, When it feels to be to much,walk a way,Always Keep in mind We, are their Help,a child and only this one (LIFE)GOD want give us more than we can take,But we can. With,Love,Stephanie

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