Emergency room visit

ANY TIPS ON HOW TO HELP MAKE A VISIT TO THE EMERGENCY ROOM LESS OVERWHELMING AND EASIER TO MANAGE?

Comments for Emergency room visit

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Jan 25, 2012
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difficult experience in ER
by: Anonymous

I had a very difficult experience taking my son to the ER. He broke out in a rash and had a fever. I took him to the ER, and explained to the nurse about my child (my child waiting in waiting room). The nurse said that he knew how to take care of children like him. Everything was ok until we were in the room. The doctor came in and wanted my son to take of his shirt. He would not. Nurses came in to hold my son down and proceeded to try to take off his shirt. My son kicked and spit and I don't blame him. I tried to get the health pract to understand - they refused to treat him. I did find a Dr. who understands spd and is very patient with my son, and my son responds well with him. I dread ever having to take my son to ER again.

Aug 30, 2011
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How to survive in a waiting room....
by: Anonymous

List about all the things that might irritate/agitate your child. Next to each try and think of ways of decreasing the impact. For example: bright lights- kids sunglasses
Loud noises- eat muffs or plugs; iPod with relaxing music or iBook for distraction.
Fidgety- bring squashy toys that can be help in their hands and fit in your bag.
Anxiety- crunchy foods like carrots, chewing gum, minties.

Familiar Teddy, toy, book. Water bottle.
If u know ahead of time write a simple book about the visit or u might b able to find a commercially available one.

Have UR child wear a hoodie jumper or hat so they can hide under it when they are over stimulated.
Provide balance between sitting and moving. Do some stretches against the wall... try to push the wall away. For children who like deep pressure or tight hugs allow them to sit close to you. Give tight hugs, wrap their coat around them tightly. Some kids line u to push down in their shoulders or hard massage. Can even rub handcream on their hands and feet. You can buy heat bags that look like Teddies. They r weighted and warm. Lastly a bunch of patients. Waiting rooms are a nightmare with kids, let alone a kid with sensory integration problems. Good luck!

May 16, 2011
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ER help
by: Anonymous

We just had our first ER visit last week. My son cracked his head with a door at the bank, and I decided he needed to be evaluated for a concussion.

I was as honest with him as I could be (he is 6). I told him they might take pictures of his head with a very loud camera shaped like a tube. I also said they would be shining lights in his eyes. He did amazingly well. The cartoons in the room helped some too. :)

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