How can we get SPD listed on the DSM-V

by Angela
(Minneapolis MN)

In about a year a newly revised DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) will be released. I know many of you are wondering why you should care and what is this technical sounding thing. Well basically it is the document that describes and labels all of the mental disorders. Most importantly it is the list that your insurance company looks at to decide what therapy gets covered. If a disorder isn't on the list it isn't covered. For most families that means therapy is not affordable.


The worst part of all of this is that SPD isn't even being discussed for inclusion in the new DSM called DSM-V (for fifth edition the current published in 1994 is DSM-IV). Parents will not be listened to about this. You can't just call them up and request SPD be added, it is about as difficult of a process as getting a drug approved by the FDA.

What you can do is contact every health care provider you know and beg them to contact the work groups about SPD. Psychologists are the best ones to contact them but every OT and pediatrician helps. If you have contacts in the research community or educational institutions use them. Time is running out, the decisions are being made right now. If the DSM does not include SPD many children may go without needed therapy.

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May 05, 2012
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SPD in the DSM
by: Anonymous

A lot of people seem to be forgetting that SPD is very rarely a stand alone disorder. It often accomponies or is accomponied by ADHD, Autism, CAPD, and other disorders that are listed in the DSM. I think of it more as a medical disorder as well, but if it can get my insurance to pay for therapy and other things that my child needs, go for it.

May 17, 2011
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Scandal
by: Anonymous

I am an occupational therapist with 35 years of experience. I am certain that what we have been calling sensory integration deficits are actually executive function deficits. Instead of getting constructive help with problems with emotional regulation, ability to inhibit and shift, planning and organization, hundreds and thousands of dollars are spent on therapy for which there is no validating evidence. It is an ethical violation.

Apr 22, 2011
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Nauriological vs mental
by: Maria

While the argument is completely valid that SPD is Neurologically based, not mental, the truth is because of the signs and symptoms exhibited by persons with SPD are behavioral traits, it is most commonly seen (and misdiagnosed) by psychiatric professionals.

My personal experience with SPD starts almost 20 years ago having been misdiagnosed myself as ADHD. We now know what it really was, but would not have known at all and my own child would have been misdiagnosed had we not been referred to an OT. My son's family practitioner was at a loss to help with his behaviors, so we were referred to a child psychologist. The psych saw us for 3 sessions and at the third session told me he did not think he could help me, but suggested I go home and google SPD, then call a local OT group that deals specifically with SPD. This man had attended cross training with this particular group and was able to pick up on extremely subtle signs of the root of my son's issues.

Anyone less observant would have labeled my son ADHD/ODD/OCD, prescribed a half dozen meds that would not have worked, and sent us packing.

May 12, 2010
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medical vs mental
by: Angela

I would just like to comment to those who are suggesting that SPD be classified as a medical condition. While I am in complete agreement with you, the academic and scientific community is not. Autism, the biggest known developmental disability category, is considered a mental disorder not a medical condition.

May 12, 2010
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less likely a psychological problem
by: Anonymous

I would not want SPD to be included in the DSM simply because my son might have it. For me, its better that he has SPD than to have other diagnosis in the DSM and be labeled in that category. I know DSM and studied it in college extensively. I know there might be some advantage for other families for SPD to be in the DSM, but I look at SPD as more like a medical problem rather than a psychological problem.

Apr 18, 2010
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It is
by: Anonymous

a neurological disorder............
I dont see how they can not put it in the dsm as its own entity.

Apr 18, 2010
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spread
by: Anonymous

The recognition of sensory processing disorder in DSM V, could get more support if the real knowledge on this disorder was disseminated worldwide.

Apr 17, 2010
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sensory processing disorder in the word
by: Anonymous

Frequently visit this blog, I noticed that all comments come from the USA. Sensory processing disorder because it is not known in Europe and many other parts of the world. There are children who suffer and parents seeking answers. Why not spread the knowledge? will leave millions of children suffering and their parents misunderstanding.

Apr 17, 2010
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medical vs psychological
by: Anonymous

Wonder if anyone has considered SPD to be a neurological disorder, and as such should be classified as a medical impairment and not necessarily a mental disorder...just a thought.

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