My 13 year old son... now it all makes sense

My son is 13, and after reading the checklist, I can go down and say "he does that, he says that, etc". But at the age of 13 is there anything else that can be done? Or is this how he will live the rest of his life?


I know he's older now, but going down the list there were things that he did as a child, maybe it was my denial thinking that there was nothing wrong with him, or was it my believing that doctor's knew what they were talking about? What is the next step for him? What is the next step for me and his father? If anyone can give insight to this I would appreciate some feedback.

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Dec 11, 2010
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sensory issues
by: Anonymous

I'm a special ed teacher for middle school students with autism, I completely understand what your pre-teens and teens are going through. In my classroom, I do functional math and functional science, I call those two subjects functional because I incorporate what my students need as per they IEP and then some more plus the subjects in question(math and science) Every day is a different strategy but I always bring into the equation "a sensory diet" which has helped my students overcome their issues on a daily basis. I have an student who only eats peanut butter sandwich for nuriton and lunch, after two weeks into "my training" he is now eating chicken nuggets and trying little bites of everything I put in his plate. It is not an easy task, but I care for them and I know how hard it is as they grow up and become young adults with sensory issues.
should you need some more info eamil me at mlopez7891@gmail.com

Oct 15, 2010
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My son is 16
by: Moonlight

My son was diagnosed in 2nd grade. He still sees an OT at the High School and he has an IEP, but he copes wonderfully. Understanding a sensory diet and brush therapy was our life saver. I think he is one of the most courageous people because sometimes it is harder to be different when you seem normal to the eye then when there is a disorder that can be visually discerned by your peers. He has taught himself great coping skills and usually knows his limits and respects them. Of course new environments and classes can really be difficult for the first several weeks. Good luck to you all and believing and accepting your child is the best gift you can give them.

Jul 26, 2010
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10 yr old son has lots of these sx!
by: Paula

My 10 yr old has major issues w/ texture. From food (nothing but salt, spicy or just pb toast) Never tries any new foods, says it tastes like cardboard, slimy, etc. Also, clothing must be very soft! Physically he is growing fine, almost 5' (will be taller than his 13 yr old brother soon). Very tender-hearted for animals, but non-emotional at other times(i.e. funerals, etc.) Very much into engineering, math, music, but absolutely hates motion. Doesn't like to go anywhere - every night he asks me if he has to go anywhere, if I have to work, or if daddy has to work. Prefers to just be at home w/ no activities. He has played soccer each season for the past 4 yrs and seems to do well - just doesn't like to leave home to do it. Socially, he does find w/ friends - but still won't spend the night at anyone's house.

I'm thinking he may have Asperger's (high-functioning) b/c he does really well in school w/ the exception of reading comp. unless we find an AR book that interests him! Any thoughts on this - should I have him tested or just keep going as we are? I'm worried about 5th grade this yr b/c they put so much emphasis on AR points and he gets so stressed. Thanks!

Mar 12, 2010
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My 13 y/o son.. now it makes sense
by: Summer

I understand how you are feeling. I have known for years that that there was something not right with the way my son processed information. He has been diagnosed with everything from borderline mentally retarded to ADD. We have worked with him at home to help him overcome his problems and it has helped but there is not but so much I know to do. I learned about this disorder through a training at the daycare where I work. Boy was I excited to FINALLY have something to stand on. Now we are in the process of getting him dome therapy!. Just wish I had known about this years ago!. Good luck on finding your children help also.

Mar 06, 2010
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Also 13 year old son
by: LI Mom

My son started Middle a year and half ago. I had him in early intervention program in nursery and pre-K for "sensory" issues. I was told to send him off to elementary with no services; things seem to go well and he adjusted to school great. He continued to have some sensory issues but was told he was "borderline" and leave well enough alone.

At 12 he went off to middle school; 1700 kids three floors front and back of large building. Was excited to leave his small, 400 kids in all elementary school. He said the kids annoyed him and ran to his first day of 6th grade. All hell broke loose by the third and fourth day. I was told, separation anxiety (No problems with this for his first 7 years of school!) that he didn't want to attend, this that and everything and for two months he got worse and worse physical and emotional systems as we tried our best to get him to adjust. I constantly brought up the sensory issue, that this may be too over-welling for him but was poo-pooed by the staff; they insisted I get a physch eval and put him on meds and pull him out of school.

I did have him seeing a psychologist the moments this started and even he thought this was all manipulation on my son's part. I pulled him out started the meds for two months and his panic and anxiety were worse. Pulled him off the meds, told the psychologist he was wrong and got our son into a smaller parochial school setting. Things have been much better, STILL pursuing the sensory issue with anyone that will listen; I know my son is NOT DOING THIS ON PURPOSE!!! He justs wants to be like all the other "annoying" Tweens and teens his age:)

I will keep checking back for valuable info; let me know if anyone else has experienced this; I've read EVERYTHING FROM School Refusal to Phobia and this seems to fit.

Mar 06, 2010
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You are not alone
by: Susan

When I finally discovered a name for the suite of characteristics my son and his father exhibit, I was glad to finally have a name for it. My son is 14, so trying to find therapies and protocols that are age appropriate is a challenge. I'll keep searching. Good luck to your son and to your family.

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