Our Joslyn

by Patti
(Omaha, NE)

she LOVES her kitties

she LOVES her kitties

My daughter is 5 years old, but has been delayed developmentally. She has always been about a year behind. (crawled at one, walked at two, talked at three, etc) She spent 2 years in our district's early development program and is now in Special Education Kindergarten. We have no clue why she is slow in developing, but she seems to be progressing and we are sure she will catch up.


I have always suspected her senses were somehow out of sync. She will eat anything from dry lettuce to a spicy taco with enthusiasm, she will nurture any living or unliving thing, but then turn around and wrestle with dad and brother (and win) She will look lovingly in your eyes while she strokes your face, but then be the biggest sass I have seen. She will cry that she wants something, then cry when she gets it. She does get hurt, but rarely bothers to stop long enough for me to know it. She is rarely startled by loud noises, but her hearing seems just fine. She will talk on and on about something she loves, but will not acknowledge something new we are trying to show her. She knows how to use the potty, and will go when we take her, but she just won't tell us or go on her own. As she gets older, and better able to communicate, I think some of this will work itself out.

In the meantime, at least there is something I can research that may help us understand why she is the way she is.

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May 30, 2010
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where are the spd adults
by: ann

As we are learning no 2 spd kids exhibit the same symptoms so it struck me how much joslyn's are similar to our 4 year old. I would find it so helpful to hear from adults who now look back and realize they had/have spd and how their lives turned out. The not knowing whether our kids will be able to live independently, hold jobs, have a family or whether they are facing a marginal life is so difficult.

May 23, 2010
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Our biggest concern
by: Joslyn's Mom

It is really hard to put into words where her delays are. She shares some same characteristics as autistic children. At 5 and a half with 2 years of SE preschool and a year of SE kindergarten, and they are retaining her this year, keeping her in SE kindergarten. She still has difficulties understanding concepts, processing information and retrieving it. She has come a LONG way, and I think she will do well with the extra year of kindergarten. (one example - she just recently figured out colors, after 3 years of working on them) The biggest hurdle is that we cant get her potty trained. She understands the concept and has no problem or fears of the potty chair. I think maybe she feels differently inside (or not at all) and has a hard time knowing when she has to go.

May 23, 2010
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hmmm
by: Anonymous

I read your post a few times and can't seem to find anything wrong or that would interfere with school. She may have some sensory issues but I couldn't really tell. 2 of our kids have sensory and one has autism. Good luck with your journey.

May 13, 2010
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response
by: Anonymous

My daughter was also found to have developmental delays early on and received help through early intervention. I had a wonderful service coordinator that always listened carefully to my concerns. During one meeting with her i was trying to explain my feeling of "somethings just not right" but it is hard sometimes to explain exactly what the problem is with sensory children. Luckily during this visit my daughter started some of what i thought were quirky behaviors, the coordinator immediately picked up on her sensory issues and we began receiving OT. All she needed to help her along was the sensory input then it didn't take long for her to catch up and close many of the gaps in her developmental delays.

She still has issues with speech. At least for us sensory issues have always effected her expressive language to some degree.

Just to let you know my daughter also loves spicy foods, she has to be really hurt to express pain(before therapy she didn't ever acknowledge pain), she loves animals though she is a little rough with them, and she loves to wrestle and give big, tight hugs, she has a very long list of sensory input that she loves and needs i thought i would share a few of them that your daughter also needs.

Hope this helps, i really believe that addressing her sensory issues is how she closed the gap on her delays- goodluck

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