Precursors to Sensory Integration Dysfunction

by Doreen Stobbe
(Campbell River, BC Canada)

Have you considered how early childhood medical intervention ie: TRAUMA, could influence the onset of dysfunction in sensory integration?

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Feb 28, 2012
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C-section as precursor
by: Anonymous

Both my children have spd, my son seems to be in more control, still hates loud music or loud voices, but is better than my daughter, he hates the beach because of the sand and seaweed, my daughter loves the beach but she is extremely picky as far as foods go, she is much more sensitive to smell and she is terrified of fireworks and balloons, impossible to calm her in their presence.
Both were emergency C-Sections, both had cord around neck.
My daughter also had seizures as a baby.
I definitely believe there is a connection between the two.
I experienced a lot of trauma growing up but do not have spd, more like phobias. SPD relates to specifically sight, sound,
Taste , smell and touch.

Oct 03, 2011
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I agree to YES
by: Anonymous

I think that they should look into trauma at birth. I had to have an emergency c-section and my son couldn't come through the birth canal. He even had a little bump on his head. My son is 18 months and he cannot stand or walk on his own. He only will eat baby food and will not say mama or dada and he never mouthed baby toys or put his fingers in or near his mouth.

Apr 05, 2009
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HEREDITARY FACTORS
by: Anonymous

I believe there is some sort of hereditary factors. I had epilepsy as a child. It went away after I became pregnant with my first child. Then I developed psuedo-tumor cerebri. That went away around age 25. Now I just have coordination and movement speed issues. I have 4 children. 2 were diagnosed with ADD and ADHD and one with Autism. The fourth has issues but has not been diagnosed yet. I have been doing research on Sensory Integration Dysfunction and all my children and myself fit into this category. Could that be the missing link?

Jan 20, 2009
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Trauma based SID
by: Anonymous

Yes, I believe childhood trauma can bring on SID. I was sexually abused at age 4 and again age 8/9. By age six I was showing signs of SID with extreme sensitivity to sound/noise. At age 60 I still have it and it's getting worse! Aren't I lucky... ha ha

Nov 06, 2008
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I would guess "yes"
by: Anonymous

When we filled out all the paperwork to have our daughter evaluated, there was a lot of information requested about prenatal and birth issues. I don't have any real confirmation of this, but it seems to me that they collect this kind of information to help with ongoing studies and future studies. Someone may, in fact, be collecting information on all SPD cases to determine if a high percentage were Cesarean, or if they were premature births, or if they were linked to gestational diabetes, etc. PLEASE NOTE, these are just "what ifs" - I am not a medical professional.

Personally, I can connect some of my daughter's SPD traits to sensory issues of my own and my husbands, so I do think there may be a genetic component too. But I also think my daughter's Cesarean had something to do with it, or maybe the stress hormones I made when I learned I would need an emergency C-section (after planning a home birth). I hope someone IS studying this, especially if it means some cases of SPD can be avoided in the future.

-Kristin

Oct 16, 2008
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precursors
by: Anonymous

I do believe that some trauma often plays a part in onset of sensory issues. My daughter had the umbilical cord wrapped around her neck at birth. That combined with a 32 hour labor most likely played a big part in her dysfunction. However, my husband and I also have mild sensory issues, so maybe some of it is hereditary. I think it definitely gets worse as our stress level increases or if we don't get enough sleep, but I don't believe that trauma is the only answer.

Oct 15, 2008
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.... Possibly
by: djm

When I was four years old I had half my face bitten off by a dog... maybe that's what started it all. Could continued trauma, such as a back injury make it still worse?

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