Questions about SPD and Autism

by sarah
(NC)

Hi-- My 25 month old son has many of the symptoms of SPD. He has been in speech therapy for 8 weeks and is just about to be diagnosed by an OT w/ SPD. (I am pretty sure this is what she thinks.)


It is clear that there are links between SPD and Autism and I am concerned about my son having Autism. The big difference w/ my son is he is generally happy and social. Many friends and family have told me there is not way he could have autism b/c he is so happy and social. I just don't know. My question is:

Are there types of Autism where children and generally happy? Or maybe does not struggle as much socially?

I have been looking all over the Internet and I can't seem to find any information about children who have autism but still appear happy. Now I say this all w/ a grain of salt. I say he "appears" happy and is "generally" happy b/c his level of happiness has gone down so much in the past few months. The average person would look at him and THINK he is happy all the time. As his mother I know that this is not the case. He has begun to struggle w/ food, noises, sleep, certain objects, ability to play, needs me all the time, and much more stuff lately. But the average person would not look at him and think he has a social problem and they would think he is very happy.

Sorry if this question is poorly worded. I am new at this. I am just learning about SPD really and just figured out it can be linked to autism.

Thanks,
Sarah

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Mar 23, 2009
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Yes, sociable and autistic
by: Anonymous

My son, 3 1/2, is well-adjusted, happy, pretty sociable, and sounds similar to yours. He has autism. They call it a "spectrum" for a reason--children are all so individual. Your language is fine, it's the lack of diagnostic or evaluative language that is problematic.

Where I find the "sociability" or well-adjusted autistic child falls between the cracks is that he's not a "squeaky wheel." He retreats quietly in social settings and therefore may not get the attention he needs or be evaluated appropriately for intervention. In some ways, I assume that at this stage, he is at a disadvantage and that I have to point out the real struggles he faces. This was certainly the case with our school district IEP process.

Hope this helps.

Mar 21, 2009
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Questions about SPD and Autism
by: Anonymous

Hi Sarah I was also told that my son was too socialable to be Autistic. He was evaluated at Stanford, and they diagnosed him 47xyy syndrome, also known as Jacob's syndrome, unusual sensitivities, and an unusual history of pica.
Because my son interacted well with the Dr. during the evaluation, they said he does not meet the criteria for an autism spectrum disorder.

People have told me that there are children who are autistic and socialable. When I am out in public with my son, he cries when people talk, or look at him. Sometimes he tries to hold a conversation, but the more questions they ask, the more frustrated he becomes. Even though the 47xyy syndrome explains his immaturity, I still feel there is something else going on. We saw a Geneticist this week to get more information about 47xyy, which wasn't very much. They want to do more blood work to look deeper in his chromosomes just to make sure there is nothing else. I hope this helps you.

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