Running back and forth while humming/growling

Well, it's not a growl exactly. My daughter was diagnosed with Sensory Integration Dysfunction last week. She is 18 months old. She will run back and forth humming or will run around the house with two toys in her hand humming. When she is doing this it is very hard to get her attention and get her to stop.


Does anyone else's child do this?

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Dec 05, 2016
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Happy Runner
by: Anonymous

I love hearing all these stories! I have a 4 year old daughter who runs back and forth while "dreaming". Sometimes while she's doing it she'll hunch over, raise her arms up and/or grunt. She usually does this running/dream like trance activity when she's happy or bored--especially after TV shows or when we're transitioning between activities (about to leave somewhere, preparing for dinner, etc.).

It's like she's playing through an intense scene or story in her head. She has a great imagination. I've always assumed this running thing was normal or just a way to burn energy, but now I can tell it's distinctive to her and not common with other children. She has no other behavioral concerns (except difficulty getting to sleep or shutting off sometimes) and she's very intelligent (knew her alphabet, colors, was very verbal at 18 mo, started to read at 3, has a shockingly good photographic memory, etc.) but I know this is something odd/special.

I'm interested in hearing from other parents or especially teens/young adults who do this. I'm trying to find others so that I can learn more about it and parent my child the best way I can. Thank you for the insight you've already provided me! :-)

Oct 03, 2016
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So relieved to read this!
by: Anonymous

My 12 year old daughter does this pacing up & down sometimes turning into a little sprint. She says she does it when making up stories in her head. I used to do a similar thing at her age. Usually whilst thinking out scenarios in my head. Only trouble is she will do it anywhere & sometimes people comment on it. Yesterday we were just leaving a coffee morning & she was doing whilst we were saying our goodbyes & a elderly lady commented on it & obviously found it odd. I just wish people wouldn't make anything of it & would just ignore it.

Sep 15, 2016
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Paces back and forth
by: Anonymous

My 8year old son paces back and forth nonstop with swooshing sounds. He's been doing this since he was 3.it can be anywhere in the house or public places. For several minutes at a time.. (like he's in a trance )He's not emberassed. He says he does this to release energy. He's a smart kid, funny ,lovable, but very short tempered.

Sep 06, 2016
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YouTuber Dream
by: Trololol

I have done this too, and my mom tries to make me stop, and I only do it at recess, snack, lunch and after school. My mom thinks it affects school-time and time I spend with my friends, and I think it has something to do with my big YouTuber dream. I really want to be a YouTuber. I have a YouTube channel (Nether4Nether5). That is my YouTube channel. Check it out. There are only a few posts so far.

Anyway, my friends call me silly for doing this, and I've never met anyone in my life who does this too. And I am really happy to hear I am not alone.


Aug 31, 2016
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Advice Please!!
by: Anonymous

My Son is 19 months old, he started occupational therapy a month ago I first signed him up because until now he just grunts and has yet to say any real words, (he doesn't say mama or dadda) nothing at all!! the therapist said is Sensory disorder and he also always has one toy in both hands while he paces around the house and does this wobbling walk were he spreads his legs and bends his knees to walk, at first I thought it was a cute little dance but when I asked her his therapist she said it was a symptom of SPD.. now Im very concerned... is this something they grow out of or does this affect them for life?? I just want to know whats the best way to help him with this disorder. Thanks in advance for any advice from parents that have gone through or are going through this....

Aug 19, 2016
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My ADHD Makes Me Want To Run! :)
by: Lilliana

I noticed that i have adhd.. im up at 12:31 writing this and figuring out that i can live with my adhd.. im not diagnosed because if i was then adhd would be part of me forever and i am NOT adhd... i just have adhd! what does that mean, thats what your thinking, right? adhd is like constant caffeine and you're always wired but get this, coffee makes people with adhd FOCUS!

anyways, im writing to say that your son could have what i have.. im in a constant state of excitement and i get this strong urge to sprint and run and do harsh sports for absolutely nothing!! and you know what? I do it.. i sprint up the street instead of walk..

and i dont care what anyone thinks... and i think your son will be ok

Aug 04, 2016
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It's Maladaptive Daydreaming Disorder (?)
by: Anonymous

This is probably maladaptive daydreaming disorder. You're lost in thoughts so much so that you may end up doing some of the 'actions' that you imagine in real life. You may talk to yourself too sometimes or have a repetitive habit (pacing/running/clicking a pen maybe). It varies amongst people. I've had this for as long as I can remember (a decent 5 years), check it out because it may be the case for you/your children.

Jul 20, 2016
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A mini trampoline may help
by: Mom of a 10yo

My 10yo son does this running, jumping, skipping around the house too. He says he's thinking.... whether that be about something he's watched or he 's making up a story in his imagination. We have a mini indoor trampoline that he 's used as well. So for anyone who says their running around is a problem for others, maybe see if you can get a mini trampoline to confine the space you need.

My son also likes to run long distance as a hobby, so I am going to encourage him to use that as an outlet for all his energetic thinking needs. A boxing bag might work too for some as a way to expend their thinking energy. I'm not saying there is anything wrong with doing laps around the house, but these are ideas to make it look less weird if you're self-conscious about it.

Jul 07, 2016
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Does anyone know what it is called
by: Anonymous

My experience with this is a little different. As long as I can remember I have been doing this I'm 14 now.I make the noises that are happening in my head and I'll put my hands up to my face. I don't know if it's the same thing.

Jun 27, 2016
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You SHOULD be worried!
by: Anonymous

I paced as a child, and I'm a published author with three tech businesses. So, be afraid!

I looked this up because my 4 y.o. son is pacing and grunting/growling. I thought the growling bit a little weird, but as far as I can tell, he's just "lost in thought," which used to be something we admired in creative people.

I'm coming to grips with the fact that he's entitled to spend his time as he pleases, and that being still, obedient and "like the others" may not be the best traits to strive for if we truly value creativity and innovation.


Jun 25, 2016
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I do it too...
by: Anonymous

I'm a teen and I still do this. It started when I was like four and I just never stopped. Except I don't growl or hum. I kinda just daydream about events that have happened or what I wished happened. Sometimes I'll even just make up a random story and daydream while jogging back and forth, and I'll do it for hours. Weird but at least it's harmless.

Jun 21, 2016
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I have it too!
by: Anonymous ( not my real name )

6/21/2016 I'm 10 soon to be 11, I've been running since I learned to walk. I run, because that's how I'm thinking of something or making something up in my brain. I do it everyday, but not when I'm sad I just lie on my bed. Nobody had a problem, will expect when I do it the morning, because I wake my family up. On tell yesterday my mom said " I'm going to read something to you " she looked up sensory processing disorder, and I have all the sentumes. I ask her why you looked it up she said " your teacher found it out😱😱😱 that's my story!😎😎😎😎🤓🤓😱😱😱

May 28, 2016
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I feel normal now
by: Anonymous

Wow I feel so relived I been doing this for like 3 years now I think of a scenario in my head that happened before or what I will like to happen , or what I wish what of happened I run back and forth smiling and thinking its best if I have music but I can do it without it .I feel so happy I kinda forget I'm doing it my family knows about it now they think its weird but funny at the same time they know that I will never stop and I'm happy so they let me be they call it the ( hopping ) or bunny hop

May 27, 2016
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I have found my people
by: Anonymous

I am so happy to have found this! I'm 17 and I run around my house so often that my family has gotten used to it. They call it my "galloping". Apparently my aunt also used to do it. The only thing is that I waste huge amounts with this wierd habit, especially since I have difficulty sleeping at night and end up walking around in the dark at 4 am making up scenarios in my head. What I want to know is if this habit signifies anything or is it normal.

May 15, 2016
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Pacing!
by: Anonymous

This behaviour is normal according to some
People when I have researched it! Apparently if you are left handed you are right brained dominated therefore pacing allows you to be at peace with your thought and ideas and this behaviour should not be stopped as it it allowing the person pacing to be creative and use their imagination!

May 13, 2016
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Running Back and Forth While Listening to Music
by: Anonymous

I've been running back and forth around my room when listening to music. I thought nothing of it and I don't even know I'm doing it sometimes. I don't hum or growl when doing so, but I more or less run back and forth hitting door frames when listening to music. It's something I never thought much of until now. I've been doing this since I was 12 and now I'm 16. My brother does the same thing, but he doesn't need music. I always made fun of him for doing so. Now that I experience this myself, I understand it. I slip into a different reality and it feels like nothing matters. Now that I see other people suffer from the same symptoms, I don't feel so embarrassed by it.

May 03, 2016
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I completely understand
by: Anonymous

Hi, okay so first of all oh my gosh finally I've found people with similar problems to me. But I think mine is less, um like intense, I guess, as the people I've been reading about on here. But ever since I can remember, I walk around in circles (like around the coffee table, the kitchen island counter, dining table etc.) and as I'm walking around them I'm thinking. Usually I'm thinking about scenarios in my head, like maybe something that happened earlier that day and I will go through the scenario in my head but I will make it play out how I wish it had. Or sometimes I will make whole new scenarios in my head but it's usually always involving people I know, not made up people. And the scenarios are usually where I am suddenly a really confident person who goes out and talks to lots of people and makes heaps of new friends and has a boyfriend (my crush). I just scenarios of how I wish my life was, basically. Anyway, thanks for reading this if you did and please reply if you feel the same.

May 01, 2016
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Running back and forth while making up stories in her head
by: Anonymous

I am still not sure after reading these comments whether i should be concerned or not. My daughter runs back and forth while making up stories in her head. She is 8 years old now and has been doing this for a few years. She also loves to play with tassles and neckless chains just fiddling with them through her fingers. She is a lovely sensitive caring young girl and is well like within her circle of friends at school. Acedemically she is average and likes school. Do i need to be worried?

May 01, 2016
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22 years old. Can finally relax
by: Anonymous

This is crazy, I'm a 22 year old and reading all of these comments. For the first time I can finally relax about this, it is a huge weight off my shoulders. I always thought it was something I should have grown out of forever ago, but i get some of my most creative thoughts by doing this. I get so concentrated in all of the made up universes in my head, I forget about real life for a moment and it relives so much stress in my every day life. I always need something like a sock to twirhl in my hands and enough space to run around, and I'm off to another world. Thank you all for making me feel somewhat normal

Apr 29, 2016
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Don't worry about it!!
by: Anonymous

I'm 18 years old, and since I was 4, I run around (houses, gardens, pavements etc.) making up stories or processing stuff I've recently seen. Kinda had to regulate it to the garden and house recently though because apparently it's weird to see a teenage girl running around talking to themselves.

It's really nothing to be worried about: maybe it's a little eccentric to some, but really, it's more a way of burning off energy (I find that moving helps me to visualise stuff better) and using your imagination.

Apr 29, 2016
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Don't worry about it
by: Anonymous

I'm 18 years old and have done this since I was 4 (My family and I refer to it as 'thinking'). It's nothing to be worried about at all: I run around the garden and house, thinking up stories.I have been told that I occasionally talk or mumble whilst doing so too.

I don't know why I do this, but I find that moving simply helps me to better visualize everything.

I don't think a diagnosis is required for people who do this, we're just having fun and making up stories to keep ourselves occupied.At least, that's what I do :3

Apr 24, 2016
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Anyone know what's wrong with me?
by: Anonymous

I am a 14 year old girl, growing up I guess I was just a normal shy child apart from developing mental illnesses towards the end of primary school. Since then, I get the random outburst where I just shake my head viciously and throw my arms around or stamp my feet really fast like I'm running. I'm not sure why I get them, sometimes I seem to think it's out of boredom or outbursts of energy but tbh I have no clue. It kind of feels like a toddlers tantrum but I'm a teenager lol.

Apr 13, 2016
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I thought i was weird...
by: Anonymous

Im 14 years old and i do this, imagining things, that im in different places. I realised that i look like a total weirdo and surfed the internet for answers, what is wrong with me. But now i feel relieved that there is more people like me.

Mar 12, 2016
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My son?
by: Kenya

My son is almost 19 years old and he's still running up and down the hallway in my house while mumbling to himself. Please, can anyone tell me what this is?

Mar 08, 2016
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I still do this at age 16
by: Jake

I litreally thought i was on my own with this, ever since i could walk ive had to run up and down the house when ive been sat down too long, if i have watched a film or played a video game i think about that whilst running but without knowing i make wierd noises and flap my arms around. Ive always thought its a way of getting rid of my excess energy. I have hyperkenetic dyhsorder which means i cant sit down for long periods of time without feeling uncomfertable so i thought it was because of that or maybe my adhd. Its good to know others have it though, but is there anyway to cure or get rid of it? Im 16, 5 ft11 and 160 pounds, and yet im running round like some lunatic, and it hasent got any better since i was little, could anyone help? My email is vnespi@gmail.com if anyone can mail me about it.

Mar 06, 2016
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6 year old running and flapping hands
by: Anonymous

Omg!!!!
I just cannot believe I am reading all your posts about children lapping the house with a small toy in each hand and humming/ mumbling and seemingly unable to stop.
My son has been doing it for years now. He is now 6 years old. Maybe I first noticed it when he was 3?....
We have tried to find a "cure" to this through OT.
It's not working for that to be honest... His OT is convinced he has ASD...
He otherwise appears like a normal happy chap.
He does look a little crazy when he laps though... And flashes his hands as he does it.
He tells us he is " playing".
He doesn't do it at school but is really excited to do it as soon as he wakes and as soon as he gets home from school.
Gets upset if he doesn't get a chance to do it as soon as we get home
He also does it at the shops and as soon as the school day finished after he has farewelled his friends.
He has been diagnosed with Sensory process disorder
Any thoughts?

Mar 02, 2016
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Humming and skipping
by: Rebecca

I first posted on here a couple of years ago when my son first started doing this at about 5. He is now 7 and still doing it. He is a happy but very sensitive very chap and uses the "skipping" as we and he call it to process excitements and anxiety I think. He uses his imagination to make up stories about Lego figures while he is skipping but doesn't like talking about the stories he makes up. He has become an incredible reader and is very good at creative writing at school.

These posts have been a real comfort in knowing there are others like him. His reception class teacher thought he was very slightly autistic but I actually think it's more aspergis like. My doctor told me not to worry, but he is definite different from other children and I want to help him prepare for a life of that. The main thing is that he's a happy chap but he is happiest when he is skipping and nor playing with other children.

To all the children and teenagers who have posted on this site who are struggling to know who to talk to about it, as a parent of a boy who does the same thing, I would say talk to your parents and help them understand what you feel, your worries, why you do it, and what you think about while you do it so that they can help you to make sense of it.

2 years in I still don't know where to go for guidance on this but I am happy in the knowledge the my son is happy and healthy, creative and very special. As long as he is not struggling academically or socially, do I have to worry? If anyone has any advice for UK based children then I would be interested to hear it. One day I will show my son this page so he knows he is not alone. Thanks for sharing.

Mar 01, 2016
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Running back and forth
by: Anonymous

I am so relieved to see that other people have experienced what my now 11 year old son has. Reading some of the descriptions it is just like they are describing him to a T. He has been runing back and forth in the living room since he could walk. He humms alot and talks to him self all.the time. He is very sensitive and takes everything to heart. He has alot a mood changes. I would liketo know where do we go from here?

Feb 29, 2016
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I do this too!
by: Anonymous

Ever since I could walk, I run back and forth and imagine movie ideas and write I interesting movie outlines afterwards. I never knew anyone else did this! I go into a whole new world and forget I'm even running around my living room like a maniac. It's nothing to be concerned if I don't think because it seems to spark creativity and great ideas. My parents thought I was crazy until I met another girl who would run back and forth to music and imagine music videos to the songs. It's funny how it makes your mind work so much more and imagine things to where you forget you're even moving.

Feb 29, 2016
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I think I have this
by: Shon

I'm 22 years old, nearing 23. I've had this problem for years, bouncing around, talking to myself, lost in my own reality. This reality has allowed me to become a great writer, but it's also driven my mother crazy. She's practically at wit's end with me. I want to at least be able to manage this condition. I hope this place will be able to help.

Feb 22, 2016
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Finding it difficult to fully understand
by: Anonymous

My son is 9 and every morning he gets up and runs back and forth in the living room, he says he is using his imagination. He sometimes does it after school when he gets home also. It's confusing because he can also sit for reasonable long periods of time watching movie' without getting up. He is a very sensitive child and is gets quite anxious to the extend that sometimes he struggles to get his breath and is soon to tears. He doesn't sleep very well, and has never really slept well since being a baby, he hears every noise. He is doing Ok at school but often comments on minor issues which are major to him, usually other children's not being kind or name calling which he struggles to brush off. He has had problems with noise and was diagnosed with tinnitus but reading these posts I am starting to think it's more noise sensitivity. Some of the issues mentioned don't apply so I am not sure now if he has this condition or not? I don't want him labelled by doctors/ school so not sure what to do? Any advice?

Feb 16, 2016
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Did not know this was a thing
by: stephanie

My son is 6 and for the first time in my sons life I have googled his pacing back and fourth I never knew this was a disorder. My son always paces back and fourth when watching movies. He paces back and fourth in our living room I guess pretending to be in a action movie or something. He is constantly jumping around and making noises. Whenever I asked him was he was doing he would say he was playing. I always just thought this was normal. My son also was diagnosed with mixed receptive expressive language disorder so I also thought this pacing back and fourth came from that.

Jan 31, 2016
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THANK GOD
by: Jester

I am 14 and ever since I could remember I would pace and hop back and fourth making noises and pretending to be in a different reality or something like that. I always would do it if I ever had a spark of interest in something, like after a movie I would pretend to be someone in it and i could only do it vividly if I "jumped around" which is what my family calls it but when ever they would ask I would feel embraced and till this day I honestly don't know why I am the only person I know who feels compelled or otherwise forced to do this at first I thought it was because I was disappointed with how my life was I grew up in kind of a poor family and I never got the opportunities that my friends did and I always disliked how my life would always just get worst and how I never got the happy ending I wanted so I just thought that doing this was a product of my blain life.

Growing up I always excelled in school and was always striving to be at the top until I started goin into my teen years I just became lazy and kinda got lost in my imagination I guess u could say and I just kinda got depressed with my life so I got more focused in my fake reality, taking that into account I became an excessive LIAR I became so fed up with my real life that I took elements of my fake life to make everyone think I'm more intersteting I lied soo much that even I almost started believing in my lies, I rwally regret it but I can't go back, now I decided to look for help and to seek guidence so if u understand me or if u have the same problem and relate to mea and u do the same stuff I doo please please help me cuz I need Someeone who knows how it feels to have this "disorder" please reply to this post I will check this page periodically. And this might just seem like and average teen thing but it really isn't cuz I know all of my internal issues come from this "problem" so please help me out.:)

Jan 15, 2016
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Your child is not weird
by: Anonymous

I am 27 and have had this disorder for as long as I can remember. It started when I was a child. I would watch a cartoon, and as I started reminiscing about, I would, without realizing, be running back and forth humming. The motion of my pacing was the action, and the humming was the noise. I called it my daydreaming. I used it as a creative tool for the longest time, letting my imagination run wild. Your child will grow out of it with time, as they become adults and start being busy and responsible. I'm in med school right now, and can still account hours and hours of "daydreaming" while I was younger, up until I got to college. It was never a disability to me, nor will it be with your child. Just love them and encourage them to be social and to learn to have fun with others.

Jan 11, 2016
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Wow! My son does this!!!
by: Sissi

Wow! For the first time (of my sons life) I googled his pacing/ humming. He turns 11 next week and he does it ever since he can walk! We never really paid attention to it and just let him do it. I always thought this is a great exercise lol. Only the sounds that he does can be at times too loud and annoying. He says he's pretending to be cars and their engines. I always knew that this is a special behavior but he's doing well in school and smart. So interesting that there is so many others out there who show this behavior. He also tilts his head up to the sky sometimes when pacing. We always called his pacing "gggh" cause that's the sound he does with it. Thank you for this eye opening site!!!

Dec 19, 2015
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I do something similar
by: Anonymous

I am almost 22, I have been been pacing for years. When I am pacing I am in my mind, I either analyze my problem, what I want to do with my life, or live in my own world of my creation. When I was a kid I could not control it, but now I can, not completely but mostly. In my world I have done and can do anything I want, and that makes the real world dissapointing in my world magic is real, here everyone is out for themselves.

Nov 18, 2015
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My 8 year old boy
by: Anonymous

my 8 year old son has been running back and fourth for years in the kitchen since he was young. I asked him why he does it and he tells me he likes to imagine he is one of his characters in the shows he likes. I just think he has a great imagine nation and acts it out. He also says it is a great way to exercise. He also say he gets into it so much that he forgets he is running/skipping.

Oct 28, 2015
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Daydreaming...
by: Autumn

So I turned 11 last month... anyway... I always have this thing where I run around in my room and daydream a lotttttt of different things (Ex: when I have something crazy happening to me, I have to daydream about it... HAVE TO...) its kind of consuming my life... Its hard to focus in class and I used to be a straight A student... I'm doing better then average but still not as good... all of that humming and growling is just me talking to myself and I realize how weird it is because I'll be laughing uncontrollably and suddenly stop. So I mostly daydream about 2 sets of different people and they're all friends who cuss a lot but they're funny! I have favorites that always take the spotlight too! Its mostly Skylar on 1 and Gwen on the other (set)and they both have a group of friends. In that group of friends they have a best friend. For Gwen, it's Bisca and for Skylar it's Kelly... I always have to run while doing this. Crazy scinario too!! I imagined Skylar and Shaq livestreaming on a kangaroo farm... that one was weird. Kelly has been scared of owls because one tried to digest her. An owl man actually...

Oct 05, 2015
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humming and pacing
by: Anonymous

My child does this too..any advice ?? Thanks in advance

Sep 25, 2015
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To K
by: Anonymous

Thank you for your advice, my family actually have 2 salt lamps, one in the lounge room and one in my sister's. Not so long ago I was in my room trying to do homework when I suddenly started feeling overwhelmed and almost started choking and I couldn't breathe, my parents almost called an ambulance. In the end my Dad took me for a drive to calm me down.

Sep 25, 2015
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Don't beat yourself up
by: K

I'm sorry to hear your experience is so stressful and upsetting. Look into what is called an "empath". This is when you, almost in an E.T. like way, can sense and in some cases feel the emotions and feelings of people around you. So, if someone is frustrated or angry it can be contagious to a certain degree. This is also something my son deals with, but is a stronger connection with me. He actually called me one day and asked me if I was ok, and it was amazing because I had heard bad news and was upset. There are techniques for shielding yourself. It may work. You may also be sensitive to some technology. If you get particularly agitated in a room with computers or a large TV, there are ions that the body senses, that can lead to agitation and a build up of stress and you don't know from where. Hymilain salt lamps help with that. Good luck!

Sep 25, 2015
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I am a sufferer
by: Anonymous

For many years I have done this, and my family and I all hate it. Sometimes if I don't pace around for a while or if I am told to sit down, I start to feel sick and freak out to the point where I start crying. Once when I was at school I had this sudden feeling to walk around but I couldn't because I was doing my NAPLAN. In the end I was let out early and I felt as if I was going to die or something really really really bad was going to happen. My PDHPE teacher has tried to talk to me about it but I keep denying to talk about it.

My parents do not know what is wrong with me nor do they know I'm on this site. They even make fun of me saying "*****, are you gonna do your daily pacing," or "stop pacing around *****, you look like a spastic".

I find walking around my house the only way to stay calm and stress free but sometimes pacing makes it worse and I imagine all bad things happen. My mum told me once that all I need to do is imagine that I'm in a bubble that no one can get in or out, but I see it as a bubble of all my problems compressed in my mind and in my soul and they can escape and no one can get in to help

Sep 24, 2015
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Genius
by: K

It is very nice to see this thread and I'm going to show my son later. He has been doing this since he could walk. It started off as back and forth as if he were a car, then a dinosaur - then eventually he stopped making noise all together, with the exception of some whispering to himself. He doesn't go anywhere when he's pacing, or make any dramatic movements, but he is seeing things in his head. When he used to do it outside, he actually wore a path in the yard.

When he was little we'd ask him where he was in his head, and give us this very long scenario, but if we interrupted him, he'd get very angry. Now, 12, he still does this to "get things out" as he puts it. It can be after school, after playing a video game, or after a movie. He got very anxious at his first long boy scout camp this summer because he just didn't have an outlet. We're trying to get him to journal. He says writing it doesn't help because it's too slow.

He saw psychologist in the 2nd grade to help him deal with some fear of failure issues. Everything had come so easy to him, that when he found himself actually having to LEARN things, he got very stressed out. That is all better now, BTW. But, the psychologist said that this kind of creative thought, is actually a sign of incredible intelligence. Kids who do this are very creative and analytical. Because they are analytical, they to tend to see this behavior as perhaps embarrassing, or something that makes them weird, which is why they keep it to themselves. It's actually something to be very proud of - you have big, busy brains. Definitely write it down, or record it. When he was little we'd use the computer microphone to get him to talk about it, but he really wants to keep it to himself. That's the only frustrating part.


Aug 12, 2015
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My 7 year old has aspergers & sensory processing disorder
by: Anonymous

My son is so affectionate loves hugging & makes eye contact, he's very sociable & clever at certain things. He's not so great with his coordination eg. pedalling a bike swimming.He runs,jumps,skips & growls alot.!! Ive been told it's because of his vestibular the occupational therapist explained it like he is trying to fill his cup. He also hand flaps & toe walks, he was late talking he was almost 4, but doesn't stop now. I wouldn't change him for the world it can be hard but he is fab & i love him to bits.

Aug 04, 2015
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makr it stop
by: neka

I am 14 and I skip in back and forth listening to music I can't help it I wish it stop cuz my family make fun of me I really don't no why but when I think about someone or something my blood star pumping and I hop up and start.

Jul 24, 2015
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I'm 7 and I run while humming
by: Anonymous

I am seven and I ve been running and humming since as long as I can remember.
why? to act like the movies I watch
how? I hum using English french, and Arabic since I'm trilingual. My mother always gets mad at me but my dad understands that I need to spend my excess of energy ...my sister who is six understands and does not always tolerate this habit.

My piece of advice: be patient with your kids
I run and hum and I am a normal boy. I'm smart ...I'm good at languages and maths and at school. Don't worry.

Love from Tunisia

Jul 21, 2015
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i do nearly the same
by: Anonymous

Im 17 and i do nearly the same exept that i do not do this when i hear music and i dont either hum. instead i go around and imaginating stuff that i can see for movies for example , maybe its not even the same thing but when i saw this it seemed wuite familiar. sorry for my bad english im from russia.

Jul 20, 2015
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Me Too ..
by: Anonymous

Im 14 & Do The EXACT Same Thing & Honestly Its Driving ME Insane ! Its Like Everytime Im Listenin g Too Music & One Of My Favorite Parts Come On Its Like I HAVE Too Get Up & Walk Around I Dont Know Why I Do This & Honestly Its Kind Of Annoying

Jun 28, 2015
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I'm not alone!
by: Anonymous

I'm 11 and I do this! I don't know why, but whenever I hear music or watch tv, I start running around and humming. My mom always got mad at me for doing it, and my sister thought that I was weird. I'm just glad that I'm not the only one.

Jun 22, 2015
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RD im not alone
by: Anonymous

I happy I asked my mom if I was alone and she told there others out there. I just hadn't found the she says I'm perfect just the way I am God made me who I am for a reason I have been doing this sence I was 3 and I tern 21 on July 5 thank for letting me now I'm not alone and I want you and others out there like us to know it to thank you.

Jun 22, 2015
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RD im not alone
by: Anonymous

Sorry I'm ment I have been doing this for years like sence I was 3 I'm now 20 ill be 21 on July 5.

Jun 22, 2015
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RD im not alone
by: Anonymous

I'm glad I'm not alone it feels really good I have been trying for so long to find other people like me. I have been doing this for year my mom said I got it from my dad cause he does it to and I met a girl Ike me in school who does the same thing I'm happy we wanted to if we are alone so I got the courage to look on line to find out. I pass back and forth and I talk and I make noises sounds with my mouth like a lot of people clapping or like the sound of a door closing I'm not good so people look.at me like I'm crazy it's like a TV in your head but you write the script and your not bored and its a perfect get away from reality. I have friends who don't understand fully but they don't care they love me and to them its who I am and I ask am I crazy is something wrong with me and she say no your different and people out like you just haven't found them yet and she was right I like to talk to one of you if that's ok I'd like to your friend please and thank you.

Jun 20, 2015
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Is there a cure?
by: Anonymous

I'm 13 and I have been doing this for as long as I can remember, and I have paced back and fourth so many times I have left a trail on the carpet in our house. What's worse is I had clickly hips when I was born but I was border line so they said I would grow out of it, sadly I didn't and as I grew older it got so bad it affects my knees and at times it hurts so bad it feels as if someone is ripping the muscles around my knee cap and I pace back and forth all the time, making my knee go in a lot of pain. My parents always question me but I say I'm simply bored. What happens is it , I imagine I'm in all these series of events, like I'm a murder trying to hide from a detective or I'm a ninja with powers that rival others. It even comes to the point if my mum asks me to do things and I imagine I'm doing it and Forget about reality. I've tried to explain to some of my "friends" but they called me a freak and used it against me, thankfully I now have real friends that don't judge me. I've tried to find a cure for about 2 years now and I even typed up "my daughter keeps pacing back and forth" thankfully I found this website. If anyone knows, what is the proper name of this?

Jun 18, 2015
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wow!!
by: Anonymous

Im 19 years old and this started when I was about 14 or 15. I'm so glad I'm not alone I always thought I was weird and was the only one that does this. I do it almost daily and and I live a regular life go to college and have a full time job over the summer. I do however suffer from depression I'm guessing and some sort of social phobia when it comes to meeting new people.

doing this did interfere with school work and caused me get a 2.6 in school. I was an A, B student in high school until the daydreaming and running back and forth got out of control. Going back to college next semester I now know how to control it more and only do it when I have time to as it made me a big procrastinator.

May 27, 2015
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15 and I do this more than anyone'
by: Anonymous

I have been doing this for as long as I can remember. When ever I'm alone it's like I create worlds, stories and characters in my mind. I have created many stories in my mind and whenever I create them I dream of making them into movies when I'm older. I create the stories from start to finish in my head while pretending I'm in the story. I do this when ever I'm alone and I've only been caught by my parents a few times. At school I'm popular and have a lot of friends and I socialize a ton. I've never really known what was wrong with me and I always thought it had to do with my ADHD.... lol probably. Can anyone else relate to this? Will I ever grow out of it?

May 03, 2015
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I'm 12 and I half a do this all the time
by: Grace

I do this all the time! Sometimes when I watch TV (which I hardly do) I get this sudden rush and stand up and walk around the house for sometimes hours at longest. It's really embrassing when my parent ask me about it. Just then they did and said how what I was doing 'isn't normal' and I seem 'like a special (someone with something wrong with them eg: deaf, down syndrome etc)' if anyone knows what this is called, please say something so I can know :(

From stressing 12 year old

May 02, 2015
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I do this too
by: 12 year old girl

Hey there, I've been reading the comments and I thought I was the only one. My parents always question me but I just tell them I'm bored. I'm always afraid to say anything because I feel like they would judge me. What no one knows is that I always imagine I'm these different 'characters' and they all have these amazing and complex plots and I write them down. I'm a very creative person and have been told I'm a talented writer. What confuses me is that I'm horrible at eveverything else like math and sport.

Apr 27, 2015
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My son has always done this (part II)
by: Anonymous

I've been reading the comments and it amazes that many of you mention the creative part and art. My son loves art and is good at it. He also does really well in ELA and creative writing for the same class. Just wanted to add this additional comment.

Apr 27, 2015
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My 14 year old does this
by: Anonymous

My son is 14 and has been running around in circles since he could walk. He is very sociable and gets along with everyone. He is very creative and does really well in school. He is an old soul in a 14 year olds body. I've asked him many times why he does it and he says that it helps him think. I've spoken to his pediatrician who says my son is perfectly fine. There are no other things other than this running around that has had me concerned for years. However he does so well in school and socially that I've learned to accept it. He usually does this before he begins his homework.

Apr 15, 2015
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thanks
by: Anonymous

Im so glad to know my son is alone.thanks all for sharing.

Apr 14, 2015
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My son does this too!
by: Anonymous

My son has had the habit of running back and fourth or just simply pacing while making movements with his hands, and making this shhhh sound almost as though he's lost in his imagination. This has been happening since he was about 3 as far as i remember. Psychologist, therapists, etc. could never tell me why. At first they thought he was was mildly autistic and later they said it was just ADHD and that he had Autistic tendencies. My son is now 14, he's doing pretty good in school even though he still has attentional issues. He still paces and even runs back and fourth in his room. I've caught him several times and he's told me that it helps him think for doing his homework and sometimes he just does it before bed cause he claims it helps him sleep. I also want to point out that he too is very creative. He's created comic books since he learned to read, he's a great artist, and a good writer. He's also very good with electronics especially computers and has great plans for the future! I have literally never heard of anyone else with the same habits, didn't even know it had a name. I thought it was mainly immaturity. Im so glad there are many successful people living normal lives that have this too. It feels good to know we are not alone.

Apr 13, 2015
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I know what thats like
by: 13 yr old boy

I am kinda glad to see that someone else has this problem too. I am only 13 but I have gone through the same cycle many times. Probably since I was around 5. I've been trying to find a "cure" for over a year now and I'm starting to think that its some sort of phychological thing that just tells me that I should do it and honestly it feels really good at the moment. Anyways, I've tried squeeze-balls, vabrics, leather, play doh, a drawing pad, almost every thing you could think of. I am a pretty good drawer and my parents are always wondering where I get these crazy ideas from. I am also a cartooner and character designer, and at thee moment I'm actually creating my own manga comic book!

what they don't know is that I actually mentally "pretend" that I'm these different characters and that I'm in some different world. Then the ideas and storylines are so good that I just want to right it all down.

I hoped this helped. Its good to have someone who has the sane problem as you!

Apr 11, 2015
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My daughter has been doing this as well
by: Anonymous

I am happy to see this. I was literally just watching my daughter do the same thing. She has been doing this since she was very young. At first I thought she was just being a kid but then I remembered my older brother used to do the same thing and then he would draw. She also enjoys drawing so I am thinking she is doing the exact same thing. Maybe it's hereditary???

But it does look impulsive and the noises she makes sound like grunts. When I ask her why she does this she says she is exercising...but I have seen it before so I knew that wasn't it. So I asked her what does she see when she does it and she explained that they were characters in her imagination. I told her to draw them down. I hope it's nothing that I need to be concerned with so I'll just keep watching. I am happy to see others doing okay with it.

Apr 10, 2015
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Toddler hums and runs, behind w/speech
by: Chili

My 3 1/2 year old granddaughter runs back and forth while humming and sometimes giggling. She doesn't do this all the time, but once or twice a day for 15-30 minutes. Sometimes I will call her name, when I know she is doing it, and she replies, "sorry!" Her vocabulary is low, and her speech is somewhat limited. She does communicate and has two older brothers. It concerns me, but at the same time I am relieved that there are others who have the same symptoms. I've brought to her doctor's attention, and she keeps saying she will outgrow it. I don't think she is autistic, but my gut tells me it's not normal.

Apr 10, 2015
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My 6 years old son pace around too
by: Faz (Malaysia)

He's been doing it forever. When he's bored he'll walk to and fro for up to 1 hour...sometimes jumping, skipping or just throwing up his hands. When I ask what he'says doing. He just said he's exercising.He's doing well in school but doesn't like going on stage and having people look at him. I'm so glad he's not the only one in this world doing the pacing aimlessly thing :)

Mar 21, 2015
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Used to run up and down at school and home.
by: PJ

I am a father of three and schoolteacher, but still occasionally get an excitement 'surge'. This manifested itself by a face-pull, or a sudden pacing movement, where i tense up and walk quickly all of a sudden,and the head goes down.It can also force a grimace.My kids catch me doing this once or twice and i am embarassed. It can be triggered by something winding me up, or a moment of inspiration(I am a musician and write songs in my head).When I was younger I used to run up and down the lawn to burn off excess energy, and to lose myself in daydreaming.I used to fantasise about being a footballer or pop star, or again have an idea for a song.My parents used to let me get on with it. I also did this at school but stopped at year 8, and played football instead, which was a great outlet.Sometimes i catch myself getting 'moments' in the car when alone, and i have to stop myself.I thought i might have autism as my son has inherited some of these traits,and has indeed been diagnosed with autism.i don't seem to have the other traits though,apart fro appearing absent minded at times. I was pleased to see the other cases in this forum and I don't feel so abnormal now. I have a normal life and loving family, but I don't want my kids to keep saying 'Dad, you're doing it again'.

Feb 22, 2015
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To the one who said they talk to theirself
by: Anonymous

I seriously do the exact thing. Even in the car I can do it but only when the car is moving, I don't know why. And yeah I talk to myself. I feel so crazy and usually I don't notice when I do it but I feel so embarrassed when I realize that I'm jumping around. Once I unconsciously did it in front of my friend, but I tried to play it off like I was showing her some weird dance because I act crazy around her sometimes anyways. I really hate it and want to get rid of the habit but don't know how.

Feb 13, 2015
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I do this, I'm 26,
by: Jay

I do this still although my behaviour has changed over the years. My parents never noticed when I was a kid and still don't know. I always seemed to have done it while I was alone.

My parents were always busy as they were developing a farm, when I was young. We werent that wealthy so a lack of toys possibly over developed my my imagination and I spent allot of time on my own with just my Grandma supervising me. So maybe these were factors.

As a kid I would run around humming with my imagination going wild.

As a teen I would jump up and down to music, this later developed to a lot of air guitar.

As an adult I sometimes jump up and down flapping my fingers together. Sometimes I just pace heavily. Thoughts would occur such as my future, a better career or thoughts about past conversation which would also get me heated.

My step daughter caught me a few times and told my wife and I just passed it off jokingly. My wife caught me once and I said I was cold and just trying to warm up.

I am quite embarrassed but happy to know there are many more like me.

Jan 08, 2015
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My disorder
by: Anonymous

I'm 12 and been doing this for a long time. The only people who know this is my sister,parents,nephew,and niece. My older sister doesn't know this. Neither do my friends. When i doth is i think of my future or doing the impossible. I thought i was the only one that did this. When someone is over that doesn't know about this I don't do this. When it's been over 2 weeks without doing this I start to write about some murder. Well I'm morbid (never scared, gruesome, scary to some people, weird). So sometimes when I'm mad about something, when i "run" it's not pretty expensively when it's about a certain person.

Dec 24, 2014
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My sister has had this for years
by: Anonymous

My sister has this. She just turned 20. I always thought she did it because she wanted to annoy me or something, or she was just being weird. She also has ADD, which she refuses to get screened for. At least 20 or 30 times a day, she will listen to music or daydream and start jumping around the house making very odd faces. She often imagines life with a partner, stories to write, and original characters. I see it as relatively harmless, until she is spacing out for several minutes at a time, bumping into things and getting bruises, and jumping around in places that are entirely inappropriate. She has even cut her toe very badly while jumping once, and the cut required stitches (she jumped on a sharp object that was on the floor). I always thought there was something wrong with her...I'm glad that there's a name for this and she's not the only one. Although, I seriously doubt she'll believe me when I tell her what the name to this condition is.

Nov 26, 2014
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CO WORKER
by: Anonymous

I have a co worker who does this and at times it gets very annoying. we all sit in adjoining but blocked from view cubes, but she doesn't do this while sitting at her desk or at least i don't hear it. But when she gets up to walk past my cube/desk, not only does she do a 90% turn and looks in on what i'm doing while walking she humming aimlessly, no special song or tune a person can recognize. She did had a blood clot removed from her brain a few years ago.

I don't want to hurt her feeling and ask her to stop doing something she may not have any awareness or control over. I have had another partition put up on my cube to block her out somewhat but she seems obsessed with practically stopping her stride as she passes by and turns sideways looking in, and humming some strange "la la la" tune..i'm doing my best to ignore it, but it's very a quiet work environment and once you "let that in" it's hard not to keep hearing it.

Nov 25, 2014
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It is called Maladaptive Daydreaming
by: Anonymous

I've had the same symptoms. I would run around my house listening to songs in my iPod and couldn't control it.

I'm making a blog on my experiences. Do share your inputs to tackle this:
maladaptivedaydreamingdisorder.wordpress.com

Nov 10, 2014
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whom ever posted "19 years old and still doing this"
by: Anonymous

Please write back, the way you described yourself I feel we are exactly the same. I know i'm a little late reading this but i'll check back soon hopefully maybe we could discuss this or something . Also i'm 20, male and my parents have also said I've done this since i could walk.

Nov 05, 2014
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My Boy Friend Has This
by: Dee Dee

My Boyfriend has this and he jumps and bounces and rocks back and forth and rubs his hands together fast like there cold and also chants in a different language and shakes his hand with a remote in it. I've caught him doing this several times and says I'm imagining it or he don't know what I'm talking about. He's had a stroke and I just found out he does this. It seems the stroke has made it worse. Why does he do this and why won't he admit to me he does this? He's 49 please help I'm so hurt he won't talk to me about this so I can understand it.

Oct 27, 2014
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15-year-old who constantly skips
by: Anonymous

So relieved to have found this page! My 15-yr-old daughter has skipped up and down all her life, nearly always indoors, but once on the beach and once on an empty station platform.

Other than grease marks that build up on the wall and mantelpiece*, this has never been a problem. (*She reaches out and pushes off the wall/mantelpiece, in the way you would do doing laps at the swimming pool.) My neighbour in the flat downstairs, though, has been very abusive about the noise my daughter's skipping makes and we have ended up with a Noise Abatement Order from our local district council (even though they accept that she isn't being deliberately noisy or disruptive). Our GP has been hopeless, saying there's nothing wrong ('See? She can sit there without moving fine...').

Finding this website has therefore been some sort of miracle, especially because of a link somebody posted. For FAQs about seemingly uncontrollable movements, google 'motor stereotypies and you' or 'John Hopkins Medicine/primary motor stereotypies'.

Btw, my daughter is also very bright and creative(straight As; Gifted & Talented in almost all subjects) until anxiety/depression/self-harming set in.

Good luck all with your research!

Oct 19, 2014
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wow
by: Anonymous

My son started doing this a few minths ago.. i thought something was wrong.Iam scared that people might pick on him but he cant help it. Happy to see that all of u on here reaching out to help someone eles.... Thanks

Oct 03, 2014
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talking to myself
by: Anonymous

i'm 14 and i've done this for as long as i can remember. my younger brother does it too, and we've been doing it all our lives. i find myself jumping up and down, rocking back and forth, and putting my arms in weird positions. my brother wiggles his fingers. i also talk to myself a lot, and think of scenarios or movies in my head that nobody else understands. i realized that you can do it while riding in the car and looking out the window while listening to music through headphones. it's a more discreet way of doing it, i guess.

but anyway, does anyone else talk to themselves when they're alone like someone is next to them? i don't really talk to myself, i'm kind of talking to some other thought in the room that i'm talking to. i also talk to tv shows as if i'm a character in them, like i'm writing myself into the script or something. i also think about leaving the world and going to live in a fantasy world. this really upsets me that i can't go to the worlds in my head, so sometimes i throw fits and cry about it. please say if you have any similar experiences.

Sep 28, 2014
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by: Anonymous

I'm 17 and I've been doing this my whole life, however I only do it when I'm alone. It's a great stress reliever.

Sep 24, 2014
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Glad I am not the only one
by: Anonymous

I am so happy that this "disorder" has a name and I am not the only person who feels this way. Whenever I am excited I get the urge to pace, rock back and forth, and sometimes grunt while listening to music in my room. I usually think about funny times or times I enjoyed and I think about things I would like to happen in the future; sort of like creating scenarios. I am 18 and I've been doing it for as long as I can remember.

Sep 17, 2014
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Not always autism
by: Anonymous

It doesn't always have to be autism. There is something similar called psychomotor over excitability which is supposed to be a sign of high intelligence.

Sep 03, 2014
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Thanks!
by: Anonymous

Thanks to all the adults who posted on here saying they still run back and forth pace etc. I'm the mother of a 2 year old mildly autistic little runner and I've been so worried about this habit of his. I never try to stop him because I can see that it calms him and makes him feel at peace. His therapists can't really give me a straight answer as to why he runs. It just makes me feel better reading that he may or may not grow out of it but can still have a happy normal life and even run in private later on :) Thanks again!

Aug 14, 2014
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Adult who does it
by: Anonymous

I'm 21 years old and I do this. My brother who is 28 years old also does this and we've been doing this as long as I can remember. The need to move around when thinking and daydreaming, you completely zone out and it's only after a few mins that you realise you were even doing it. It tends to happen more when happy or excited. You are reflecting on the happy memories or creating future scenarios in your head, like any other person only you have the urge to do it while pacing. I'm 100% a completely normal person otherwise, you shouldn't worry about your kids. They're fine and it's completely harmless. No point going to a doctor, all they'll do is diagnose people with is a "mild form of autism" or the likes. I've done my research on all things autism and that's NOT what we have, not even close! It's obviously just a neurological difference we have and it's completely and utterly harmless and does not effect a person in any other way. I would like to teach myself to stop personally. Just because when I hopefully start and family and move out of my family home, I don't want to be doing around other people. I would be embarrassed, not because there's anything wrong with me.. Just because I don't think people who don't do it would understand.

Jul 17, 2014
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Not the only one
by: Anonymous

I'm in my mid 20s and I did something similar as a kid! I think my parents were concerned, as I would spend hours jumping up and down and running back and forth, rather than doing my homework or getting ready for bed. For a while it went away but lately I have caught myself doing it late at night when no one is watching.

Jun 27, 2014
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Running/skipping across the room
by: Izzy

I'm 25 and I will get up and skip or run backwards and forwards across the room several times a day, normally when I'm thinking or imagining something. I've done this since I was a child and my parents have never had a problem with it, though it annoys my sister :) Oddly when I had major depression I completely stopped this for a few years, and started again when I was recovering. The first time my mum saw me skipping after I started to recover she was so happy she cried (I don't think she believed I was feeling happier until this point). It's really nice to read about other adults who do this! I also have other odd habits like rocking, humming and flapping my hands about when I'm excited, people must think I'm a right nutter :D

Jun 24, 2014
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only in motion
by: alexis

The best way for me to think is when im running around the house. I have been doing this since i was very young at first i used to kick my legs wildly when trying to sleep it was like my legs needed to be in motion. Now every time i watch tv or read a book and i see a part i like i have this urge to get up and start running while thinking of different stories using what i just read or watched i even have urges to run when i try to sleep and i think of some story that i frequently get up and go to the door to just run and jump back on the bed over and over until im satisfied with my own little story and lay back down

Jun 22, 2014
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19 years old and still doing this
by: Anonymous

I'm a 19 year old female and have been doing this since I was old enough to walk according to my parents. Generally I'll be doing something (reading, surfing the web or watching TV) and something will inspire me. I'll get up from my seat and skip back and forth up and down a hallway a few times, all the while imagining a movie-like story in my head, before I sit back down and resume what I'm doing. Rinse and repeat every 5 to 10 minutes.

I've approached my parents about this several times throughout my childhood starting when I was old enough to realize that my behavior wasn't normal but they've insisted that its due to a highly over-active imagination.
Every since I was young I wrote stories and made up characters and I still do this. In school I did very well and was in honors classes all through primary and secondary school. I'm currently attending my first-choice university and have found that, even though I continue this habit at school, it doesn't interfere with social interaction or my school-work.

Although this habit doesn't effect my life, it does take up enough time that I'm worried it may be detracting from by ability to pursue more meaningful activities. However, I've found that one way of decreasing the amount of time I spend skipping is to be very active. If I work out, go jogging or play a sport then I'll generally be too tired to skip when I get home.

One thing I will note is that my brother has very severe OCD and Asperger's syndrome, so I would not be surprised if my skipping back and forth is indicative of either of these disorders.
Anyway, I'm really glad to hear that there are other adults and young-adults out there that continue to do this. I had never thought to look this up before, so I'm surprised and comforted to know that I'm not the only one.

Thanks everyone for sharing your stories!

Jun 19, 2014
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What's wrong with me?
by: Unknown

Hello, I'm very happy I found these posts to know I'm not alone. I do not have any disorders of any kind, but I have a major problem with pacing. I'm twelve-years-old and ever since my best friends turned on me I've been pacing back and forth in the hallway listening to music. While I'm listening to the music, I'm imagining a story that goes with it. I can see anyone in this story. I can see myself or characters I've invented.
I don't make any noise at all when pacing, and I prefer to keep this habit a secret from other people.
I just can't figure out what's wrong with me. The pacing, I feel, has gotten out of control. I'd like to stop, but there's nothing better to do. I just want to be normal again.
How can I stop?
Sincerely,
(unknown)

Jun 18, 2014
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You're OK, I'm OK
by: Anonymous

I'm now a 57 year old woman with a successful intrrnational career and family life and I used to do this. Running up and down 'reading a story'. My dad was a doctor and my mum a biology teacher. They never stopped me or took me to see anyone. My brother and sister tolerated it. I was a very bright child and high achiever - early reader, straight As, top of the class, prize winner. I think I stopped in my early teens. I often wondered if it was a bit wierd - it was a bit of a guilty secret. I'm so glad I was never told I was odd. I was encouraged to fulfill my potential. I am still very intuitive and imaginative and still daydream - I run in the forest or swim now !!!

May 28, 2014
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Could be stereotypy
by: Anonymous

Check out complex/primary motor stereotypy and the John Hopkins Website.

May 28, 2014
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Thanks everyone for posting
by: Ruby

Our son has wiggled his feet and hands either when excited and or thinking from about two years old. From around three this developed to running back an forth along the landing or in his bedroom. I used to ask if he was ok or what was h doing. He usually just shrugged and smiled as said 'nothing really'. We never stop him now and he mostly does it at home. He doesn't show any other ASD traits although he is very determined! His speech and understanding far excels his peers at present. My older brother plays a lot with him and asked him the other day what he was thinking about and he said he was 'being a super hero'.

Thank you for all sharing. It seems many, many children and adults display this trait but as long as it causes no harm we just let him do it. We will continue to monitor and avoid too much television- where possible! He eats very healthily and rarely has sugary foods.

May 28, 2014
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Daughter Skips When No One Is Watching
by: JOR-EL

Hello, My daughter is 14 years of age, bright student, very passionate about painting, Anime and music. We have noticed that even when she was younger, she use to just jump up and start skipping in her room. She use to share a room with my other daughter who was able to record it with her Ipad because she thought she was in the room alone and started skipping. My wife took her to get her tested and they only came back with , Nothing is wrong, maybe she has an over active imagination. I don't believe that's the case. I don't know where else to get started, but it's clearly not just something normal. My wife found her skipping in our kitchen because she thought everyone was upstairs. It's not causing problems with her school work, she hasn't done it infront of her classmates or even out in public. But I think she should be tested for something else, but don't know where to start. She has been doing this now for some time and she is the only child that displays this type of behavior. Are there any other recommendations? Thank you

Concerned Dad

May 26, 2014
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circles & running w/delay
by: mom of 5

I have a son that is 5 yrs 10 mo. He started to pace & doing circles at 2yrs but was very advised for his age in coloring, writing and almost reading. At 2 yr 11 mos he had a total regression of fine motor skills except walking. He has come a long way since then but is still behind w/going into 1st grade. He receives speech and OT at school and was diagnosed w/developmental delay at 4. We finally have a appt on 6/17 w/specialist at CHOP for eval. of Development & Behavioral Program. He also had a MRI showing PVL on left side.

Just wondering if there are any other parents that have gone through anything like this.

May 22, 2014
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My son hums and roars especially when tired
by: Julie

My son hums to himself when he's concentrating and also hums and makes a roaring kind of noise when he's overtired. Sometimes combined with rushing about.He's 4 but still naps and it's worse when he's dropped a nap.

We have a paediatric referral for him soon. Like Rebecca said I also don't want to label, but it is hard to redirect especially at pre- school. My eldest son is dyslexic and we've found a great occupational therapist to help him with his writing. She is going to do a sensory integration assessment for my younger son.

OT says heavy type exercises are good, so pushing something with weight, lifting things with some weight and climbing.


May 15, 2014
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my 5 year old son does this too
by: Rebecca

My son is 5 and has started skipping and humming intensly in about the last month. He only does it when he is not watching television or playing lego which he is obsessed by. I have asked his teacher whether he does it at school as I was worried it was interfering with his learning and ability to fit in but she says she hasnt noticed anything but will keep an eye on it. She says he he seems to have trouble concentrating and staying focussed and often finds him day dreaming. Are these all signs of autism or Adhd and at what point should I talk to the doctor about it. I dont want to have him labelled un necessarily. When I ask him about what he is thinking about when he does it, he says he is thinking of lego and making up stories about lego batman. Any advice would be welcome.

Mar 13, 2014
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My perspective
by: Anonymous

Wow, this is the first time I have encountered others who experience this or have children who do this. I have likely Aspergers syndrome and am 24 and still find the need to run back and forth/jump up and down while thinking or imagining; it is like a relief and an outlet for me and I've been doing so my whole life. Swinging on a swing set helped when I was younger; I would zone out completely. Before I found out I had Aspergers I sometimes wondered if I was crazy for doing this! I don't typically have a problem with it in public as I train myself not to do so in public (unless it looks natural, like jogging down a sidewalk or something), though I have slightly startled people on occasion by breaking into a sudden run or jogging across what I thought was a deserted parking lot. It probably looks strange for a 24-year-old to run to the mailbox on a regular basis. Overall, it doesn't interfere with daily function; I get frustrated if I try not to do it. Just my perspective.

Feb 18, 2014
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Stimming?
by: Joanna

You might try looking at this website -

http://www.cease-therapy.com/

Basically it is a form of homeopathy which is aiming to reduce symptoms of autism. There are practitioners in the U.K. I don't know about the States.

Hope this helps. I have no personal experience or knowledge of their results, just read about it.

Feb 18, 2014
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some body help me
by: Anonymous

Why dont everyone put our brains together, and tell each other the shots, medications and foods our children have been receiving over the years. Maybe we could start with what year our child was born. My child was born in 2010. She is a 3 years old. She has skin problems and uses medication to stop her skin irritation. She has trouble with bowel movements all the time. She is constantly pacing back and forth through the halls through out the day.Her speech is not as clear right now.
She is prescribed creams by her doctor for her exzema. She also receives the shots required by law. I often wonder about a lot, with all the chemicals they are spraying on the food. The shots they are enforcing us to give our children, also keeps me curious.

Feb 04, 2014
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It's not uncommon
by: James

Saw child occupational therapist last week for assessed of my son who is 5 and been stimming since he was 1 (running back and forth whilst humming). It's apparently not that uncommon and is due to sensory. Get full report next week after they did various tests/tasks with him. The main feedback we got back at time of assessment was exercise your child so he can release the energy he needs to the running back abc forth isn't enough. Now he asks for the exercise before bed so he rest his mind quicker and sleep faster.

Feb 02, 2014
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THE ANSWER TO THE PACING AND RUNNING
by: Anonymous

My sister has recently been diagnosed with a type of schizophrenia and has been on risperdal for the past few months. The medicine seems to help for about a hour after she takes it but the pacing and running and laughing has not stopped. She is starting to do it around people now and we have to watch her constantly. She used to only do it in her room or the bathroom or when she is alone. She was a perfectly normal teen in 2012. In 2013 all of these symptoms and actions started. No medicine seems to help her calm down and be able to Consent rate throughout bathe day.

Dec 23, 2013
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My 5 yr old
by: sara

My son does this at home. I haven't heard of him doing it at school. I asked what is he thinking when he is skipping back and forth and height pitch grunting, ( he is still not able to communicate very well ) but I think he is thinking of something funny he is watching on TV. These posts are helpful to read. He has had two head injuries and wonder if this affected his development. I'm glad to know I shouldn't stop him either.

Dec 21, 2013
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So grateful I came across this, HOW DO I STOP?
by: Anonymous

Oh my god I'm so thankful I came across this. I've been doing this for as long as I can remember. I never thought other people did it until this year when I saw a kid in my class (I'm in 8th grade) doing it. I approached him later and asked him about it and what he did matched exactly what I did. We're both advanced writers and super creative, I don't know if that has something to do with it. I can't believe this is a real thing and their are more people like me out there. After reading everyone's comments I need to ask, will this last my whole life? I'm really worried it will. I've always been super embarassed of this, is there any way I can teach myself to stop? I've tried quitting before, I think the longest I've gone is 3 days, then I see or hear something that triggers it and almost can't stop myself. Can anyone help me? PLEASE? If so can you email me @itsmeholmsey@gmail.com

Dec 14, 2013
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My four yr old son runs and hums
by: Anonymous

My four yr old has been running back and forth whiling humming almost everyday for about a year. When I ask him what he is doing he will say he is an animal or he is being funny or he starts telling me a story. I am very worried... He has a great vocabulary and loves reading with me. He starts kindergarten next year... I worry the teachers will understand him if he does this at school. He has never done this in public.

Nov 09, 2013
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2 sons
by: Anonymous

I have two sons who have done this for years. They both have high percentiles and are social. They are both pacing on the stepping stones in our back garden as I write this.

All the legends of one of the greatest thinkers in the world, Aristotle, have him pacing as he thought and taught.

I noticed on this forum a trend. It seems that when a little one, say 7 or under paces, it's a huge cause for concern. When an older person talks about still doing it, they express that it's a gift, something they are thankful for even though it's misunderstood.


Oct 10, 2013
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...
by: none yahs

I am a 13 year old dude and for what stupid reason I can walk around for about 2 hours in a circle imagining myself in my own world playing some game imagining everything. I do not have a toy just myself and my mind and I am a 100% sure I have no mental health problems.

Oct 09, 2013
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Lost
by: Anonymous

I have been caught pacing in circles just about anywhere, while talking to myself. I sometimes don't realize that I am running, skipping, and have just stood in a certain spot for 10 minutes. I always get very cranky or agitated whenever I don't have room to pace or have sat down for to long. My friends and family randomly see me disappear to go pace in the attic or basement to pace and quote random play lines. I have done it for a really long time, as long as I can remember.

Oct 06, 2013
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A message from someone who has done this their whole life
by: Colby

I am 17 years old and have done this since I was about two or three years old. I would do it instead of playing like other kids and sometimes it would get out of control, but for the most part I was fine. I think I can answer a lot of the questions I keep seeing here. First of all: when I do it I am writing a movie or a TV show in my head (they used to all be action based but as I got older I started doing comedies and dramas as well). I don't know if this is what all people like me think about but that's what I think about when I do it. It only gets out of control when I'm really happy or really stressed out, so that's the only time you probably need to worry about your kid doing it. If I get out of control it usually ends in me getting really exhausted and sweaty and I have to do nothing but sit or lay down for a few hours. It's nothing too scary, I just have to relax for a while, so it really isn't that unhealthy for me. In fact, running back and forth is pretty much the only way I need to exercise.

Also, as I got older I started doing it for longer periods of time. If your kid starts to do this for longer periods of time, please know that it's not because you as a parent are doing anything wrong, it's just that as they get older they are more creative and have more endurance, so, naturally, they are going to do it for longer amounts of time. At least that's what I think. I have never really felt the urge to do this at school, my theory is that I am not as comfortable with everyone there so I don't have the confidence to do it and therefore I subconsciously resist the urge. So I don't think you will have to worry about your kids doing it in public. When I was little a part of me really wanted to do this at school, but now when I'm in a public place I block the urge out of my mind completely because I'm used to stopping myself. However, it's not a good idea to block your kid from doing this completely because, in my experience, if you are stopped from doing it, especially if you are stopped in the middle of doing it, you become irritable and cannot focus. Running back and forth, or "flailing" as my parents call it, is like eating or sleeping to me now, it's just something that I need to do everyday.

When your kid gets a little older they will probably start to think that they are weird because they do this, as I did, but really, "flailing" can be a good thing. It's a way to relieve stress that most people will never be able to utilize, and it's the first thing I do when I start writing something because I am most creative when I am "flailing". What I know would have made me feel better when I first started to wonder why I did this was to know that I wasn't alone. I had never thought to look this up before, and if I had known that other people did the same thing I wouldn't have constantly thought of myself as insane and weird. So I urge you to show this forum to your kids when they get older. Trust me, it will help them a lot.

Sep 26, 2013
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Driven by Imagination
by: story-maker

It is a relief to see so many stories of other people doing the same thing. I'm twenty and run through the house a lot without even knowing I am running. I do this while I make up stories or imagine scenarios, or edit old stories in my head. For example, I could be in my room turning my computer on to do school work and then, the next thing I'm aware of, I'm running into my sisters' room at the other end of the house.
It's fun to do make up stories in my head, but sometimes embarrassing when someone catches me at it because I might be looking strange. I found that doing skipping and jumping on the trampoline looks a lot more conventional than pacing around the kitchen table or doing leaps into the living room or crashing into my sisters' room [to the puzzled annoyance of one of my sisters].

I have a strong imagination. I also sometimes write down stories. Additionally, just because I'm not running around the house or jumping on the trampoline doesn't mean I'm not making up stories or visualizing possible real-life occurrences in my head. Sometimes this active daydreaming bothers me, because I might feel the urge but not have time/space. I also want to be in the moment more. I tried to stop for a bit - all stories - and I found out that I do it way more than I thought!
I think it is mostly a good thing, but should be in moderation.

Aug 05, 2013
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Child stunning
by: James

This is more for the guy who made last comment.

As many will know this behaviour is one of the three in children with Autistic tendencies I would recommend you get a second opinion from a professional if you are having trouble coping with your sons actions. Whilst I have the same reservations and my boy is only 5 at any point I feel it is affecting my relationship or indeed the child's in communicating its imperative you seek additional help on this. We also have a family member on my wife's side who is on the stronger autistic side and there are program's and help to tackle this for both parties.

Hope we call all continue to share our worries on here.

James

Jul 19, 2013
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Worried
by: Anonymous

My son will be 11 in 2 months and has been running back and forth while making strange sound effects since he was a little over 2. Ever since he started doing it I've been very concerned and worried that he'd be doing it for the rest of his life. Everyone around me assured me he would grow out of it eventually but it's been almost 9 years of this and he is still doing it just as often as he did as a toddler. While he is doing it it is almost as if he is in some sort of trance and doesn't have control over it. It is so severe that it has effected my mine and my sons relationship. I feel like we never bonded properly and like this child is a complete stranger to me because I don't understand him. He is a very caring boy and is very intelligent. His grades are great and is in gifted classes, but he is very un organized and has trouble focusing or even holding a normal conversation with others. he is very obsessive and when he gets an idea in his head it's all he will talk about for weeks or months until he moves on to the next thing. Nobody seems to be concerned about his behaviors except for me. Everyone keeps telling me he is a normal boy but I know in my heart that he is not normal. I don't know what to do anymore and often cry myself to sleep because of the distance this has created between us. I'm afraid he will never have a normal life.

Jul 12, 2013
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son skips around all day
by: margot

my 3 year old son skips around all day up and down the hall out around the house its like he enjoys this more than walking he is extremely active too cant rest and is a fidjet is this normal or could he have adhd

Jun 17, 2013
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My daughter has been doing this since she was 11-12
by: Anonymous

But now she is 13 and has gotten worst. I have videos that I will be posting in YouTube very soon, I will let you guys know.. We had to record it secretly from her so that we can show it to the neurologist.

Jun 11, 2013
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Running Back & Forth
by: Anonymous

I wrote here in Feb about my now 5yr old son running back forth humming, so glad to see comments since. No one has mentioned diet yet and whether too much sugar could be exacerbating our children's 'stimming' as they seem to be calling it.

I talked to school they said it isn't causing a problem but I've asked them to keep an eye on it as I think he's starting to do it there (only did it home before). He also clasps his hands together like he's trying to harness his energy, I've enrolled him in every sport to run him down but he seems boundless!!

Jun 04, 2013
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Wow, thank you all for sharing
by: Marissa

I was always so afraid to try and research this, but glad i did today. My daughter is 3 1/2 and has been doing this for over a year. She does "laps" around the house. In the morning, after she eats, and at bedtime. She seems normal - advanced even. Her vocabulary is amazing and she has a great memory. SO so so smart. I'm afraid to tell the doctor because I dont want them trying to make me put her on meds. She's a wonderful child, but the running makes me nervous. Although, she seems very happy while doing it. Very comforting to see she's not alone and neither am I.

Jun 04, 2013
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Running around and making noises
by: MP

My son does this. He's 12 now. Terrific kid. Excellent grades. Brilliant, super creative, excels at language arts, especially writing. he's a super-avid reader, inhales books. Has many friends and is very social, although some bully-types have (very rarely) made fun of him. He has great self-confidence and so just ignores them. He likes to make up stories while he runs back and forth and jumps off of things, usually for 10-20 minutes (4-5 times a day), especially after eating. We have always let him do this, although we sometimes try to coax him into writing or drawing his stories on paper. He also likes swinging from monkey bars. Some teachers don't understand his needs, but most have been supportive. So far, he has no accommodations in school, but when he gets home, he clearly needs to expend some energy. Video games seem to fuel his desire to enact imaginary scenes, but we limit screen time to 30 min. per day (mostly Minecraft, no violent games) as he would play for hours if he could. We do not watch television. He plays sports, but is not very coordinated, but what he lacks in coordination he makes up for in stamina. We are trying to get him interested in distance running, but this doesn't seem to fill the same need as running back and forth and jumping-- perhaps parquor? He went to occupational therapy for a while when he was seven; it seemed to help give him some "acceptable" coping mechanisms for when he was younger and teachers weren't sure what to do. His first grade teacher, who was brilliant, let him sit in the back where he could stand up, read or doodle during class without interrupting (he could do all of this and still follow any lessons at the same time). His fourth grade teacher immediately recognized his brilliance and really helped him grow.
This year, his teachers were less flexible and although he still got excellent grades, they dinged him for behavioral issues (mostly organizational skills, neatness, etc. not unruly or disruptive behavior) and I think that has rattled his self-confidence. I would recommend starting early in the year in working with guidance counselors and teachers so that they can focus on fostering the child's natural creativity, develop comfortable coping routines, rather than trying to sit him down and fit him into their fixed idea of what is "normal."

May 28, 2013
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Running back and forth not as bad as it seems
by: Anonymous

My son does this and I have taken him to a therapist for some other areas and the therapist showed no concern. All that I have read and heard is it a soothing action, not harmful and if it makes the child feel good do not continue to bring attention to it as it only raises the awareness and may cause stress. If there are no other sensory symptoms then I would not worry. If you are worried, though then ask your pediatrician for an apointment to a behavioral pychiatrist.

May 28, 2013
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Worried
by: Anonymous

My son who is 9 years old runs back and forth in the house since he was about 3yrs. I am very worried as it does not seem to be going away. Are there any cure or suggestions as to helping him break the habit. It breaks my heart to see him running back and forth. His excuse is he is exercising. Please is there anyone out there with suggestions feel free to share.

May 20, 2013
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Question for Anonymous 14
by: Anonymous

'I'm 14 & Do This'

Can you explain what it is you do and how it affects you? How have you coped at school and with friends?

May 19, 2013
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Im 14 and do this!
by: Anonymous

its my hidden embarrassing thingy :(

May 06, 2013
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My 6 Year Old Does this too
by: Anonymous

My son has been galloping around since he was about 4 or 5 years old. It always seemed to soothe him. At age 6 started to notice he was more figity. At 6 months old my son was put on liquid Zyrtec for allergies. Everytime I asked the Pediatrician if he could be on it for so long they said no problem. Well as his emotions would be more raw and meltdowns more often over trivial things I decided to do some research. I was horrified what some mothers said the Zyrtec did to their once calm kids. I was prepared to put my son on Ritalin but opted to see a child pychologist. He indicated some of the hyper activity could be mild Aspergers as my son, like alot of the others menitoned here is exceptionally bright. He said he was not autistic because he engages very well, looks you straight in the eye etc. He said that some children don't pick up on natural cues and therefore need "training". We started training our son as to what is appropriate in certain situations and were surprised at how well he responded.

In the course of therapy took him off the liquid Zyrtec and oh my gosh it is like I have a new child. He doesn't have tantrums, or crumble if the computer locks up etc. He still gallups around but the doctor said it was harmless and he may outgrow it. I also have him going to Occupational Therapy to help him focus his energy in writing and trying new foods...very picky eater but more of a food disorder. Working a reward system that also is showing promise. I encourage any of you to ask for consultations with Child Psychologist (who are not medication happy) and Child Occupational Therapist. Ritalin is a horrible drug for some and makes you realize running around and doing quirky things isn't so bad. I appreciate all the mom's who told me not to do Ritalin.

Apr 15, 2013
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my son is 7 and he does these things too!
by: Anonymous

I first noticed the issue when e was very small sometime between 1 and 2.He started off running back and fort in a line along the same route throughout the house.Usually the distance stays around 10 to 15 feet.He stares at the ground and makes a grunt sound usually e is smiling while doing it and he shakes his head a little but as if he is shrugging off a thought.

Within the last two years his habit has changed to where he will grunt during meals or while were driving in the car and continues to shake his head and shrug along with a blinking and grits his teeth.He does it at all different times of the day when he first wakes up, while watching a movie, during playing a game or even sitting there at the dinner table.he'll just stand up and start running and grunting and if i ask him he gives a similar answer to others on here he just wants exercise or he just feels like running.my son is very intelligent and is a straight A student get's along well with others.he smile laughs and is perfectly healthy other than this.

Apr 11, 2013
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20 and still do this.
by: Anonymous

I have been doing this for as long as I can remember. Unlike some of your children I didn't run around or skip. I would just pace around the room, my parents and grandparents never saw anything wrong with it, they knew I was just playing. My Grandmother did actually ask me what I was doing one day. I told her that I was making up a story and she asked me to tell her it and she loved it. After that she bought me a tape recorder and told me record all the stories I was thinking about when doing this. For me, it was just a way of escaping to a world all my own for a while. Now I'm preparing to do a Degree in Computer Science but I also continued with my stories and have started to write them up. Talk to your kids about it, if they say they're making up a story, ask them to tell you it. You never know, they could be the next Tolkein.

Mar 29, 2013
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Finally!!
by: Anonymous

My step-daughter is 7 and has been doing this since about age 3. She does it whenever we don't have her 100% occupied. She will run from one spot to another and back over and over again while making noises and talking. She is very creative and is always imagining some sort of scene in her head. Her teachers thought we were crazy when we had her tested for ADHD because her mom has it in her head that this is weird, so she won't do it at school. She will do it just about anywhere else. If anyone has a diagnosis for this (other than aspergers or autism - she is the most social and creative child I have ever met)we would love to hear about it! It does get worrisome after awhile. Our doctor thinks she will grow out of it, but I'm beginning to think not. We have tried getting her to draw on paper for us what she is "pacing about" as her mom calls it. She is also very sensitive and easily has her feelings hurt. She is also overly helpful to other people - by this I mean she will be so busy trying to help everyone else get ready in the morning that she forgets to get herself ready. Any information or helpful tips would be greatly appreciated!!!

Feb 26, 2013
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Running up and down
by: James

My son is 4 and runs up and down for 10mins or so replaying cartoon dialogue or a film he's just seen. He's smart, social and active it's just this he does when he's in between playjng or before we're going out. Not sure I want a label from doctor just yet as he's young and it doesn't affect his school, friends or learning at moment. Will be keeping an eye on it though. Glad to hear he's not the only one.

Feb 04, 2013
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Autism Spectrum is vast
by: PattiM

My grandson was finally diagnosed with Autism last year. His milestones were slow in coming and he has a speech delay. He looks at you when he is talking to you. He loves to hug, and touch everything. He was placed in preschool with regular children and started repeating words he heard from other children. The teacher was not active with him as far as getting him to do what the class was doing. He would get up and walk around the room with a toy and hum, which he still does, and they would just let him do what he wants. I fought to get a diagnosis for him and fought to get him into a special school for children of special needs at a charter school near our home. The come to the house in the bus and pick him and drop him off. But we usually pick him up after school. He does not flap his arms or spin. I engage him everyday with something he is interested in. He is 5 now and gets his behavior therapy at home for 5 hours everyday after school. He gets speech therapy and occupational therapy at school.
He if finally able to communicate with us and we can understand him and actually have a conversation with him. We used picture cards, Baby Einstein video, sensory cards, everything I could think of to improve his life. He is into Dinosaurs, and knows their names, (Stegosaurus, etc.) He loves marine life and knows his whales and sharks. He can tell you the difference between a blue whale and a gray whale. He knows all of his Transformers, who they are by name. We bought childrens cds with songs for him to repeat. He is learning his numbers and abc's by doing this.

Dont give up on one diagnosis. If in your heart as a parent you feel something is wrong, you fight with doctors to see specialists until you get a diagnosis. The spectrum on autism is so vast. No two children are alike on the spectrum. Each will have levels of low aptitude on some things and will know everything about what they are interested in. The children let you know. They are actually brighter than the "normal" children because autistic children analyze everything. Your child will not be like any other autistic child. They are beautiful and bright in their own way. I have learned to see life through my autistic grandsons eyes and life is beautiful, interesting and full of things for him to investigate. My grandson acts like a regular 5 year old. He has problems with speech sometimes but he is never at a loss for words. He is growing and learning, as we all are.
Just get your diagnosis, fight for therapy, keep your head up. It does get better, I promise.

Jan 21, 2013
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So glad to have found this page
by: Anonymous

My little boy, 3, in the past two weeks has started doing this. For a long time he has wiggled his fingers while playing. Everybody said he was just excited. But in the last two weeks he has been increasingly running back and forth, flapping his arms, wiggling his fingers. The length of time he does it and the number of times a day he does it is increasing, rapidly. When I ask him what he is doing he either ignores/does not hear, stops and shouts 'don't say that mammy', stops and says he is making footprints/dancing... Often he narrates a game as he is running back and forth. I googled it and have terrified myself about autism and aspergers. I've started looking at everything and finding symptoms that never crossed my mind before.

He is very sociable. Has a huge vocabulary. Talks, holds conversations, uses eye contact... seems totally normal apart from the running and a very low frustration tolerance. He gets very angry when something does not go his way/he has to go home from the playground. And he has almost zero tolerance for his sister who has just turned one.

After terrifying myself that he is broken and it's all going to get worse I looked at what he does do right and started thinking (hoping) that it was just one thing on the spectrum and that he would learn to control it/grow out of it. Your stories have given me some relief to know that so many 'normal' people do this.

Jan 05, 2013
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I started doing this when I was a preteen.
by: Anonymous

I started doing this when I was about 12.
I would walk back and forth from the playroom and through the kitchen all whilst bouncing a tennis ball of the walls. While doing this I would be playing imagination in my head. Sometimes I would voice act out what I was imagining through vocals and expressions. When I hit high school I started doing it while listening to head phones and would think about my friends and what happened during the day or what the future would be like etc.

Dec 25, 2012
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Any answers?
by: Anonymous

I'm nearly 18 years and I've done this since I was aged three. I run backwards and forwards, I twitch and flap my hands, in my mind I'm in a fast paced, rapidly changing daydream. I sometimes mutter. I know what I'm doing and can stop when I want if there are people present etc. Doctors/Councellors are not any help in explaining what I have. However I thought for years I as the only one who did this.

Dec 11, 2012
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Same Boat
by: Anonymous

My daughter has done this since she was very little. She is 14 years old now. EVERY night she goes in my room and opens the closet doors, puts on two lights and the TV, then puts on her headphones to her Ipod and walks back and forth for a couple of hours. She is talking to herself as I have seen her if I go in to put laundry away. She gets mad and kicks me out of my own room. I asked her about it again the other night and she said she would do this longer at night if she could. She is a straight A student,Honor Society member,plays volleyball,working on a Presidential Award for volunteering-which she has done since 1st grade and is VERY responsible almost to a fault. She just put up the Christmas tree, wrapped all the gifts and decorated the house for me!I think she just needs an outlet to release all the thoughts from the day or get ready for the next day and plan in her mind what she needs to do. My husband talks to himself a lot and I have trouble sleeping as my mind is always racing so I make list during the night. I think we are OK?? If these kids are half as great as mine then we will all be fine. Good luck and turn up the volume on the TV for the thumping.

Dec 06, 2012
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My daughter does this too
by: Anonymous

She is 7 and has done it since she was little - running up and down, muttering and twitching and flapping her hands, which she also does when excited. She's basically playing imaginary games in her head with whatever book or film she's currently into. She's very imaginative and intelligent and needs this outlet. I did the same at her age, apart from the running up and down and flapping. She shows no signs of social problems other than not being a very good listener sometimes. She has no other health problems other than a dairy and gluten intolerance. She only does it at home these days as she knows it's weird. There are lots of OCD types on both sides of the family so I'm not especially surprised or puzzled by it.

I bought her a trampoline and she uses that instead most of the time now.

Dec 05, 2012
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I used to this as a kid.
by: Anonymous

I am currently 21 years old and do not have autism or aspergers. When I was a kid used to do what you described in your comments, if your children are like I was, they are daydreaming and imagining things. The runing back and forth for me was the urge to move while i was daydreaming. I don't know why i had to run i guess it made easier to stay foucus in daydream. The weird noises and possible talking to themselves are what they are fantasing about, they are probbley unawhare they are making the noises. For me when i did this i completey shut myself off from the real world for a brief moment

As I got older I realized it wasn't normal and felt like a freak, but I slowly did less and less when i found this to occupy myself, watching tv, reading, playing with other kids and growing up.

My final thoughts is if you child is not digonesed with austism or anything like that, it isn't a dissorder but a habit and mabye a way to stop it or at leat make happen less often is to keep them occupied like hobbies or boardgames ect.


Nov 05, 2012
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Running back and forth???
by: Anonymous

My son is four years old and also does this. I just thought he had extra energy that he needed to burn off until my mother in law voiced her concerns about it to me. He will randomally run around in circles or back and forth and flap his arms and make a huffing sound? It seems to be getting worse because he did it in public the other day and he has only ever done it at home. He attends preschool but his teachers have not seen this behavior. He is very social and makes friends easily. The only thing is that his speech is a little delayed but he had to have tubes put in his ears at age 3. Just starting my search on this issue so any help or advice would be great!

Oct 09, 2012
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So I’m not the only one?
by: Anonymous

So I’m not the only one?

That’s a relief but I was hoping to find a definite diagnoses of what this is. I've done this most of my life up into my mid-twenties. When I was a kid I would literally pace so much and so offend behind the house that I would literally leave ruts in the yard under the trees. I'd find particular place to go. Away from everyone so they couldn’t see me. I would get angry if I was interrupted and then I’d find some where new to hide.

When I hit my teenage years I know I had a problem. This isn’t normal, and I realized that. In some ways it was a guilty pleasure.
I've always had problems interacting in school. I felt so out of place during lunch time and would buy a pop and a bag of chips from the vending machine in shop class rather than go socialize in the school cafeteria with all those people. I had a few friends. I guess what you would call nerds. But I liked them. They weren’t intimidating like the other boys.

I kelp the same girlfriend all they way through high school. I have no idea why this girl stayed with me as long as she did. I put that poor thing through so much hell. 3 years ago I found her on face book and was able to apologized for my behavior. It was truly a blessing for me to get that off my shoulders. Today I still have problems interacting with others.

I guess you can say I’m a little OCD when it comes to doing things a particular way. I despise lazy people and those who want to do the bare bottom minimal and once you made it on my black list your pretty much their for life.

Oct 03, 2012
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I'm The Same!!!
by: Anonymous

Ok, well i'd never looked this up before now. I guess I was even embarrassed to do that. I live with my GF and so I have opened an Incognito Window so she won't find this out. It is quite embarrassing for me. I have paced for as long as I can remember and flapped my hands and skipped while doing it. I'm a 23 year old male. I'd never contemplated that I wasn't alone until recently and now I realize there is obviously more of you out there.

I don't exactly know why I do it, I have loads of hobbies so I usually imagine things that won't or will not happen regarding that. I use my imagination to smack out the bully thats bothering me or drive fast cars etc etc. It helps me when i'm bored I think, as a child I musn't have had much to do and this happened. I don't really see it as a problem, but I sincerely hope no-one ever finds out about it. I'm going to carry on with it. And just hope no-one finds out. But Mothers. I wouldn't worry if there anything like me. I came out ok, i'm a level headed well rounded person and have a normal Girlfriend and family. I have a good job and career prospects. It'll look weird coz it is. I know I look weird and i'm the one doing it!

There are bigger problems in this world to work on I'd say.

Thanx guys and gals

Sep 06, 2012
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Excersise
by: Ellen

My daughter started to run back and forth in a room when she was 3. She saw me doing a "walk at home" workout (the one where you excersise in your living room). She still does it now that she is 7. I asked her why she does it, and she says that she is excersising. I just let her do it. She never does it at school. I am happy to read that other children do this also.

Jul 26, 2012
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DIagnose!
by: Anonymous

To all those parents out there with this issue, chase a diagnosis ! It felt so much better to know I wasn't making up problems in my head, because so much of this is stuff a doctor can't see in front of them, so trust your instincts if you think something is different about your child. There is help out there but you have to chase it down and stab it with a sharp stick. in other words you know your child best and if your mother in law is doubtful, or that doctor won't listen IGNORE THEM! Find someone who can understand and will screen for Autism, Pdd-Nos, Asperger's. These diagnoses only help you understand your child and help you to know what is normal for them, where to get therapy, and how to interact with the school system. Help is out there, but you have to get cracking! Early diagnosis is best! Love, a formerly heartbroken mother.

Jul 11, 2012
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Response to Julie
by: Jen

Julie - my daughter is 2yrs and 9months and does the exact same things that you have listed. I have had my daughter evaluated by every specialist I can. So far, they have been telling me that they do not think she is autistic and that the flapping is most likely excess energy. But, she does hum all of the time and squeal. She have only a few words. She will say "coo" for cookie, ball, mamma. I also started doing sign lang with her a few months ago and she picked that up pretty quickly. Have you found out anything new about your daughter? All of the specialists keep telling me they want to re-evaluate her in a few months. I am assuming because of the young age they want to see how she develops before diagnosing. I wish I could get some answers too!

Jun 28, 2012
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running back and forth
by: laura

its interesting to know that other children are experiencing this...both my sons do this..my 9 year old and 4 year old..my 9 year old is a gt student,hes a bright child..i dont want my child on meds unless they really need it,,so ive never made a big deal about it..i dont know what it is..i figured a tick,anxiety,hyperness.i brought it up to my dr once and he didnt make to much about it..my 4 year old does it more,for long periods,no humming,just runs,skips back and forth in his own little world.his little heart just pounds like hes tired..thats the part that scares me

Jun 09, 2012
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pacing, humming 3 year old,limited social interaction
by: joe

I have done alot of reading on this and I think its called asperger syndrome. when child runs back and forth,not very social avoids eye contact, very hard to have a convo with as well..my child which is 3 1/2 does all of which is being said on this forum

May 14, 2012
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questions
by: Julie

I have a three year old daughter that has flapped her arms, made a humming noise, and moves her body back and forth when she is excited. She has done this since she was a baby. Everyone tells me not to worry about this but honestly I have never seen a child do this. She does not talk alot either, when she says Ball, Bug, Banana, it all comes out Ba? I am at a loss honestly and I wish someone could give us hints to what it might be but no such luck yet.

Apr 08, 2012
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Pacing since 2 years old
by: Anonymous

I've been pacing since I was three. My parents never sent me to the doctor since they figured it was a stress mechanism. I would "play pretend" in my head. Still played with friends and siblings and did well in school. I still pace to this day, 21 years old now, every now and then. My parents eventually asked that I learn to only pace at home, and i forced myself to learn to hold off while at school and in public. Yes, those that knew I did this poked fun at it, but I always felt normal since my parents didn't freak out or ask me to stop. Today I'm in college, going onto to graduate school, have good friends and a well adjusted life. I don't know what would have happened if my parents had tried to diagnose me and medicate this pacing habit out of me. It really isn't a problem for me. Just something I have to adjust to my life. It relaxes me and I will probably pace for as long as I live.

Mar 26, 2012
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Running back and forth in front of same object
by: Carla

MY 2 1/2 YR OLD LITTLE BOY RUNS BACK AND FORTH IN FRONT OF OUR BARSTOOL DAILY, OR WILL PICK ANOTHER OBJECT EVEN AT THE PARK. HE IS AGGRESSIVE, DOES NOT WAVE BYE-BYE, EATS NON-FOOD ITEMS (EVEN HARD BACKED BOOKS FOR BABIES HE WILL CHEW ALL THE PAPER OFF), HAS TO SMELL EVERYTHING AND I MEAN EVERYTHING EVEN NON-ORDINARY STUFF, WILL LICK MY FACE, WALL, AND FLOOR. HAS MELTDOWNS AT HOME AND IN PUBLIC, IS VERY LOUD IN A RESTAURANT, ASKS THE SAME QUESTION OVER AND OVER NIGHTLY, USUALLY TAKES 2-3 HRS TO GET TO GO TO SLEEP, WILL NOT STAY IN BED WHEN TOLD KEEPS GETTING UP WITH THE SAME ROUTINE (I CALL HIM MY NEGOTIATOR), WILL TALK TO YOU IN A CALM VOICE WHILE GETTING A SPANKIN (WHICH IS ODD), DOESN'T ALWAYS ANSWER WHEN NAME IS CALLED, IS ONLY INTERESTED IN TV IS IT HAS A LOUD PITCH LIKE THE JG WENTWORTH OPERA COMMERCIAL, THE GEICO WEE-PIG, ELMO SINGING, AND THE FIRST 5 MIN OF THOMAS. THE ONLY TIME I CAN PUT CLOTHES ON HIM IS 5 MINUTES BEFORE WALKING OUT THE DOOR BECAUSE HE WILL HAVE A MELTDOWN TO GO BYE BYE, WILL NOT KEEP PJS ON HE WILL REACK FOR THE BACK OF HIS NECK EVEN WHEN THERES NO TAG.

Mar 21, 2012
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No Peace
by: Anonymous

Running back and forth... I feel for all the parents that have to deal with this issue and hope you all get answers to the the problem But who can help the ones that have to deal with this. I live on the 4th floor and the tenants that live above me have a daughter that runs back and forth constantly, and its very annoying believe me. I go up and knock on their door and they refuse to open the door to me. Because i guess they know what im about to say. I've never seen anything like this in my life..I mean this little girls runs all day...and jumps all day up until its time to go to bed 11:00pm.. Please anybody what can i do????

Feb 13, 2012
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My 19 month old
by: Anonymous

My 19 month old is adorable and funny. He often socially interacts with adults and his brothers. He constantly runs and walks on his toes, often flapping his hands. He can listen to a tune or song and hum it back almost perfectly. He can say words like dinosaur and sphygmomanometer and even talk up to five word sentences, but does not appear to understand some questions or simple instructions . He does not respond to his name most of the time. He also often mimics back things said to him. He is obsessed with a couple of books, one of which he can almost recite in moderately clear words. He screams when upset, arching his back and does not calm down easily. He won't eat anything except for mostly white foods and occasionally pasta with a tomato based sauce. He is very clingy towards me and is a poor sleeper. Whenever I take him to the shops he screams and tries to climb out of his stroller or trolley seat, unless I give him my iPhone to play with. His older brothers have asd's and ADHD. Some of the behavior is similar and some different. I am extremely worried he is asd and Im not doubting he has ADHD, but everyone around me keeps saying it is all learned behavior and to not worry. What should I do?

Feb 09, 2012
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I dont know what to do
by: Anonymous

Im seventeen and im burly looking up what it means to talk to yourself and walk back and forth, Ive been doing this since I was little and I try to stop but I cant now ad I gotten older I dont do it as much but when I am sometimes I stop and think about it and tell myself "What am I doing "? The worst yhing is that my parents dont know I remember when I,was,little I would be in the room walking back and forth and I would move my hands and my parents would always make fun of me. Now I wish someone would help me is just that im embarrased of saying what I have.Im still a normal person I person I play sports and one day I want to become a doctor thats my dream to become a pediatrician and one day ill find out what is wrong with me.Burly right now I read this and im glad I did.

Feb 09, 2012
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Normal?
by: Anonymous

I have a cousin who is extremely artistic and intelligent (graduated with Master's in Art from Yale) who used to do this when he was around 5 (he is now 35). My mom asked him years later if he remember running around humming at night before he went to bed and he did remember. When she asked him why he answered that he was also thinking about things and this was how he cleared his mind.

Feb 04, 2012
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better than boding in solitude
by: Anonymous

I run back and forth in my own room and have Aspergers. I have been doing this since I was small. I think of it as an escape, especially if you have no one to talk to or have no friends. The most reoccurring theme of this 'thing' is that I create worlds in my head. Your kid may have trouble socializing, but may also have a gifted imagination. From young adult "runner" to Moms, embrace this.

Jan 24, 2012
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Listen
by: Anonymous

Hi I used to do exactly what you are describing. I did this till I was about 10, I noticed in the playground that only one other child did this. Il try to describe exactly what it looks like. You run jump and walk around making little noises I used to prefer doing this while holding a figure of an action man or something like that. It may look strange but what exactly is happening is I was playing. Inside my head I was acting out different games in my imagination. It's very hard to describe. You play inside your head. I spoke to the other boy who did this years after school and he had trouble deceiving it as well. Please though I beg you not to do anything to your child. I remember my mum asking me loads what I was doing and I never told her. It was embarrassing because my brothers or sisters didn't play in this way. Just ask them if there playing? Because it's just another form of playing and it's more healthy then sat in front of a tv

Dec 10, 2011
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thanks
by: Anonymous

hello thanks for your reply, at least someone else thinks this kind of behavior is not normal... i spoke to his o/t yesterday and wrote down some of the things he does,she is going to have a word with another doctor and get back to me, she is also going to go to his school and observe him for a morning too

Dec 08, 2011
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Go to drs for assessment, what can it hurt?!?
by: Anonymous

Jen I would definitely get your son assessed. Everything you have described is classic aspergers traits. He may not be, but what you have said about him fits the picture. I would trust your own instinct as not all teachers have a great understanding of asd's. Gross and fine motor development delays or difficulties are also very common. I know I'd rather get my kids assessed and find nothing wrong, than listen to a teacher and potentially miss something that can be helped. Good luck. Btw 2nd son also assessed and diagnosed with asd despite kinder teachers and family members telling me I was paranoid.

Dec 07, 2011
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my son is the same
by: jen

wow .... my son is 6 and he has been doing this for years, when ive asked him why he says he has to do it ..and if i ask him to stop he always says in a min when i have finished... he says its a game.. do you think he could be autistic? he also has to walk the same route to school and always on the same side of the street , if we have to cross over to the other side he gets really upset.. he has been diagnosed with adhd but his teacher at school seems to think there is nothing wrong with him.. he still cant write clearly and the school have provided him with a laptop so they can read what he has written..also he will only wear soft feeling clothes and refuses to wear jeans .. he hates having socks and shoes on ..he gets obsessed with things .. one time it was dinosaurs then gormiti and now he is constantly on my laptop playing moshi monsters .... but thats all he talks about too... could anyone offer me some advice ? he dont really play with the other children at school as he has balance and co ordination difficulties and the other kids call him a baby and leave him out of their games

Oct 04, 2011
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Get your children assessed!
by: Anonymous

To all of the parents on this page who have not done anything about their child who paces, runs, handflaps, has been talking from an early age... GET YOUR CHILDREN ASSESSED. Sure it is likely that there is nothing wrong, but they can all be symptoms of an autism spectrum disorder. Not all autistic children are non verbal and most are highly intelligent with sensory issues. Quite often motions such as pacing back and forth, running etc are calming to people on the spectrum. It helps them to "regain a sense of calm within". It doesn't matter if they are not on the spectrum, but if they are, the earlier you commence early intervention the better chance you have of helping them with any sensory, speech, behavioral and physical issues. We had our boy assessed at 2 yrs 7 months diagnosed aspergers, he is high functioning and because of the early intervention commencing at a young age, has progressed beautifully with no struggles at preschool.

Sep 29, 2011
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Running & Humming
by: Mrs. Turner

My daughter has done this as long as I can remember. She is 6.5 years old now and was diagnosed with aspergers 2 years ago. I do believe there is a connections between the two. I have tried to stop it. I soon learned it is something she has to do.

Aug 31, 2011
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10yr girl also paces
by: Kelsey

I also have a daughter who paces. She was diagnosed with Aspergers when she was four but didn?t start pacing till 7 or 8. She is 10 now and it has developed into skipping and laughing out loud. I asked her what she is doing and she says she is daydreaming/making up stories. I find the pacing somewhat annoying but allow it in the house if she is just walking. As I feel one has the right to do whatever they want in their own space on their own time. If she wants to skip I tell her to take it outside. I also discourage it in public places not just because I?m worried about her being made fun of but because she is in her own world and doesn?t pay attention to her surroundings. Often running into people or getting in their way.

Aug 28, 2011
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pacing/running in maladaptive daydreaming
by: Anonymous

To the adults here that still run/pace back and forwards while daydreaming and are wondering about it, do a search for "maladaptive daydreaming."

I have been doing this my whole life since childhood. I pace or run up and down my room while day dreaming and making up stories in my head. Sometimes I talk outloud to myself. The strange thing is i CANNOT day dream WITHOUT moving around. It just doesnt work. I dont do it so much now im an adult (30 yrs old), but if i have spare time and need to unwind I still do it occasionally! Its never affected me whatsoever or interfered with my life. Its just a private little quirk I have which to be honest I wouldnt want to get rid of as I have a huge imagination and I love the stories I can make up. As soon as real life beckons, I can stop and get on with my normal life again!

From reading on the internet ive found there are lots of people out there that do it. :)

Aug 27, 2011
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Running back and forth
by: Kevink

My son has been running back in forth in his room since he was a few years old. He is now 11 and still does it. He's just an average child in every way but I've always been intrigued by him spending 30 minutes to an hour running back and forth in a set pattern in his room. He even added a step in the pattern where he sat on hi desk as part of it. Sometimes it will be late at night and he'll be in the bathroom running back and forth in particular pattern of running, hopping, and skipping.

Jul 04, 2011
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Just sharing my experience
by: Anonymous

My son was very similar to your son. That us exactly how I would have described my son at 3. Around that tine we had assessed by the school district in California and they diagnosed him sensory integration disorder. A great book to read if you haven't already is "The Out of Sync Child". at that time one if the psychologist suggested doing am autism assessment. At the time i didn't feel he had enough symptoms to make him autistic but decided to go through with it to be on the safe side. They ended up diagnosing him with "autistic like". I then applied with our Alta Regional Center that had him assessed by a psychologist with a PhD and she diagnosed him with PDD-NOS. which means he had some of the attributes of autism but not all of them and some were not considered significant. But I will say by 4 more behaviors began to appear, language did not progress and more and more odd mannerisms (like humming, running into things, not socializing properly etc.) were more frequent. I decided to take a look at DSM IV myself and realized my sons PDD-NOS had turned into autism. I would strongly suggest an assessment because the sooner you can get him help the better he will do. I learned how to do a type of therapy called ABA myself while applying for services and he has consistent improvement. I regret nit doing it sooner but when a child has PDD-NOS they don't qualify for services in CA even though they still might need them and can benefit greatly. I'm not saying your son has either one if these diagnosis I just think better to be on the safe side. I'm so glad I listened to the school psychologist suggestion even though it was scary. My son is doing better and better.

Jun 30, 2011
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Running back and Forht
by: Anonymous

My son just turned three years old and just recently have I become concerned with him running back and forth (RBandF). He will RBandF while intermittently flapping his hands behind his ears and yell out nonsensically. He also has a hard time making/keeping eye contact. When he is running back and forth, he is in his "own little world" and it is hard to "snap" him out of it. Why does he do this?

He is a loving little boy who enjoys to cuddle and play with he dad and little brother. He is very courteous of others feelings and is very sensitive. He does not speak much but is able to "get by" with using common nouns (mommy, daddy, baby, apple, car, doggy, kitty, etc.).

It also seems that as he had progressed in agae he had regressed in both expressive and at times receptive language. I am scared and do not want people thinking he is "weird."

Any one with words of wisdom are appreciated.

Jun 23, 2011
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any thoughts?
by: Anonymous

I have a four year old boy who runs back and forth in a 3pt pattern several times a day for quite some time, until he is sweaty and exhausted. The pattern involves running back and forth, twisting in the air, landing on a couch, jumping a few times, twisting back and starting the pattern over again. He usually makes guttural sounds that sound to me like a Native American chant. He has an IEP for a speech delay and attends early preschool. The school thinks he might have aspergers and/or sensory issues. The pediatrician thinks he is just an average little boy and that we are looking to get him diagnosed when nothing is wrong. It begins always when he is bored or overwhelmed (like being at a playground with lots of children). He sometimes also exhibits facial tics. But, he doesn't do it everywhere. Right now, the other children think it is a game. Both his father and I have sensory issue but have learned coping skills. My issue is visual whereas the father's issue is tactile. We are not sure what to think, we have even considered Tourette's as a paternal great uncle has a rare debilitating form of it. I am not sure what his future holds, but I plan on getting him running on a treadmill soon to see if he requires the back and forth or if he just needs to burn energy. Sometimes I copy him and he always stops, smiles at me and asks me what I am doing. I say copying him and then he starts back up again. I know of no one person that can keep up with this kid. I worry but try to console myself thinking he will be an Olympic track star :)

May 13, 2011
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concerned Sissy
by: Anonymous

I have a 3 year old sister there is 22 years between us my mom was 47 when she had her and my stepdad was 50 she was born a day late and she is fully developed she started walking early but recently she will pace back and forth for hours and she get's pissy when you ask her what she is doing but will respond with I'm trying to find my kid's and when she is pacing she has such a look of concentration on and she twirl's her fist it's really freaking the rent's out and they keep asking me what she is doing and I don't know what to respond with ????

Apr 13, 2011
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Running back and forth
by: Traci

My daughter is 7 years old and was born 3 months premature and weighed only 1 pound. She has always flapped her arms and this last year( maybe longer) she has been running back and forth while making noises and repeating movie lines. We have seen a psychologist and she had mild Autism. We are enrolling her in a class that is for Autism this next school year. I really appreciate all the helpful hints that parents(caregivers) have given. Reading all of these comments definitely makes you realize you are not alone.

Apr 11, 2011
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Glad to see that i'm still normal
by: Anonymous

Omg...I thought I was the only abnormal person in the world who did this. I am actually 22 and the earliest I remember doing the running back and forth around four or five years of age. I used to run between the living room couches. Usually I am imagining myself doing things or I am just thinking about random things while listening to music. I still do it on occasion (very much less frequently than when I was younger) and when I get bored or when I get pretty upset...but I just thought it was a thing that I did. I never thought there was an actually thing for it...I never talked about it and I am not sure if my parents know I am still doing it because I live on my own now (they remember me doing the running back and forth since I was little. I am actually am an alright person and this has never affected me...I'm bout to go back to school to get my masters degree...I graduated a semester early from college with a 3.8 gpa and in the top ten of my graduating class....almost got a fulbright scholarship..and i'm in a career field i enjoy......but glad to see that i am not alone! i thought that i had issues for the longest.

Apr 06, 2011
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painful
by: Anonymous

Hi my son is 3 years old he runs and hums it is so painful to see some people look at your kids differently most especially when we are in a playdate. Does any body experience this?

Mar 16, 2011
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10 yr old daughter running back and forth
by: Sally

My 10 year old daughter runs back and forth constantly she touches the floor once and keeps on jumping. She does not do this at school to my knowledge but does at church. My husband and i ask her why she does it and she can not explain only that it feels good and she thinks. So when she does it my husbands states if she is thinking about him. Interesting to see that other children out there are doing the same. I was recently told that she suffers from anxiety and a little ocd. I am looking forward to have her tested more. I think she is to grown to be doing this especially in public, I am afraid she will get made fun of.

Mar 07, 2011
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running back and forth
by: Anonymous

My son is four and half years old and recently diagnosed with PDD-NOS and is high functioning. He spontaneously runs back and forth throughout the day, and has done this for quite some time. I have asked him what he thinks about when he does this and he says he doesn't know, but that he likes to do it. I find it very interesting about the posters here who say that when they do it, they are sort of in their own little fantasy world. I wonder if my son is experiencing the same thing, but not yet able to articulate it?

Feb 20, 2011
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Wow!
by: Anonymous

Im 17 and ive been running back and fourth since I was 6. Its not just that im running back and fourth but im imagining that im doing things and it feels like real life its very hard to explain but its kinda like im making my owm movie in my head like i could do whatever I want.. i think im the only one who does it lol

Dec 14, 2010
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As long as I can remember
by: Anonymous

I've been running back in forth for awhile now. At first I just got on my knees and put my hands in a chair to the point where it looked like I was praying. I kept it secret because I feared my parents reaction. Eventually my father found out and when they asked why I dot it, I simply said It feels good: As if I am in a fantasy world of my own creation. Once that was out of the way I moved on to pacing back and forth. I am currently 19yrs old and I still run back in forth usually listening to music. Its as if I am taking a break from life and enjoying my own world. I do this almost daily. I might as well call it a habit. Running back and forth is the only thing I look forward to when I'm alone. But I'm curious about it. Does anyone know why I do this?

Oct 30, 2010
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Same here
by: Mike

My son is 18 months old and he runs back and fourth when he watches Baby Einstein. We think he has SPD but is not yet diagnosed. He has also been growling lately. He humms while he eats too.

Oct 29, 2010
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OMG
by: Anonymous

I am a grandmother of a 4 year old grandson. He has been running back and forth with his finger pointed out and his head dipped down. He has been doing this since he could walk. It has worried me because other children can be mean and although he hurts nothing I do not want him picked on. We actually call it the dipper doo. I tell him he can do it at my house but not at school. I was so surprised to see others with symptoms pretty close to his. Although we do not know what it is or why it helps to know that he is not the only child out there that does this. He has no other mental or physical symptoms that I can see. He is a very smart child and has been talking sentences since he was 18 months old.

Aug 30, 2010
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Running back and forth while humming
by: Amy

My son is 4 1/2 and he has been doing this running and humming back an forth since He could walk and run. He also lined up his toys and suffers from anxiety.

We call it flying, but he is definitely in his own world. He has not been identified yet, but we have been to every doctor possible. An OT said he had SPD when he was 3 but our insurance at the time would only pay for 12 visits. I noticed a difference but he still does this.

I tell him it is ok if he does it at home, but not to do it at school because the other children may not know what he is doing and they might think it is silly and be mean to him. I'm trying to protect him, but I worry so about him. I'm concerned he may be on the spectrum. Does anyone have any advice for me?

Jul 27, 2010
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I never knew there was anyone else.
by: Back and forther

My whole life I've had the compulsion to run back and forth while wringing something tightly in my hands. While doing so I conjure up my own fantasy world. It's kind of like entering a trance like state. Im only vaguely aware of my surroundings and seeing quite clearly my day dream. This idiosyncrasy has never been disruptive to my normal life other than I spent my childhood with constant calluses on my hands.

As a kid I would perform this ritual often, sometimes for hours at a time, but could return to a normal state whenever life interrupted. As an adult I return to this type of play only occasionally, but do still feel the compulsion from time to time. I?m in my 40?s now married and by all appearances a normal healthy person. Until I found this forum I never heard of anyone else with this compulsion. I always figured I couldn't be the only one but this is the first time I've read someone else describing similar experiences.

While my compulsion has not adversely affected my life I would like to know why I do this as part of understanding myself better, but I have no idea where to start. Does anyone know where I should look to find a qualified councilor that could diagnose where this comes from? Or where I might find more information?

Jun 23, 2010
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HELP
by: Anonymous

I have a 4.5 year old boy who has been running back and forth since he could run. He can sit still for tv, computer games, but thats about it. Been to UCLA and Fresno Children's Hospital- diagnosis seems to be unwanted because he is so young. He gets hurt alot doing the running thing- knocked out his front tooth yesterday when he hit something in his room. When he runs it seems he is muttering imaginary play scenarios or just things we have talked about during the day. I see what looks like a motor tic on very rare occasions where he swings his head and closes his eyes. He does this at home and he was doing it at preschool, I pulled him out.I put him in t-ball and I watched him one time run into the back of all the kids' shoulders- is this a sensory thing? He also has an anger issue too but this seems to be getting better. Anyone have anything similar?

lizwelliver@sbcglobal.net

Jun 03, 2010
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To Answers from So glad to see others out there
by: Anonymous

I have asked my 4 year old all the time when she is in her routine, "What are you thinking about?". She looks at me smiles and says the same thing "Nothing". As you say as long as she is not hurting herself, all is good. I have asked her doctor, only because her father was diagnosed with OCD when he was in his teens, he stated that this right now is a habit and makes her happy and only around 8 years or older we can determine if she has developed OCD as well. But for now, I am glad to hear other stories and from other kids that they are well adjusted with this similar habit.

Jun 02, 2010
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Update...
by: Anonymous

I'm the one who posted:"Sounds so familiar
by: Anonymous"
I wanted to give everyone here an update on the "humming and running" Since the last post, we have moved to a new town back in the US. Since moving we have him in the best school in the district in Co.Springs. After our first IEP we had, I started doing more research on his sensory processing disorder. I read the book Sensational Kids and have passed the book to his special ed teacher and her and I have come to agree that my sons problem is in fact Sensory Processing disorder. We have adjusted his school days to include sensory breaks and charts. Since these changes he has improved dramatically. He is a different child in a few months. I would recommend that anyone who might think their child has some sensory problems check out the book. We are currently looking into the STARR center in Denver.

Jun 02, 2010
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Answers
by: Anonymous

#1: Obviously, i have NOT outgrown running back and fourth. i can however, control it. its just something to do when you're board - take it as a gift that each of your children have such a splendid gift! (unless of course it is harming their life in some way?) as long as there's an on-off switch, your family should be good to go.
#2: i am older and am running out of space. Running back and fourth and propelling myself off walls can be pretty noisy!
#3: Um, WE DONT WANT TO GROW OUT OF IT! how would you feel if someone thought that swimming was weird and confusing just because they didn't understand it because they couldn't experience it first hand? what if they told you to stop it all together? you would feel sad because you couldn't do one of your favorite things and hurt because nobody liked the fact that you were so happy participating in it. this unique quirk doesn't hold back me in any way, and as long as your kids learn how to flick that "off switch", they are completely normal. this is no 'disease'.
#4: have any of you asked your kids what goes on in their head while they move? you might be surprised at what you hear. Please post back!!! id be curious to know if they do what i do :]

Jun 02, 2010
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Me
by: Anonymous

This is me. I'm 16 years old. I love sensory stimulation. After seeing a movie or reading a book, i can implant the characters of my favorite movie into the roles of what i've just seen. i've created an extensive saga in my head using "running/skipping/swinging back and fourth. i don't make noise. it just looks a little odd. god, i can't believe how similar your stories sound!

May 01, 2010
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running or skipping back and forth
by: PEACH

my 11 year old daughter does not do any humming or growling. She actually just skips or sort of runs along down the hallway back and forth. She changes her path she is now going back and forth from the livingroom to the kitchen she touches the livingroom door then goes to the refrigerator or the back door and touches it then does this continuously for about 15 minutes sometimes she sings, but softly, she looks as if she is thinking hard or in her own world? does she need medication? is something very wrong? she has been doing this since she was about 5 yrs old she is a straight A student always on honor roll I just do not understand this habit of hers?

Mar 18, 2010
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So glad to see others out there.
by: Anonymous

My 4 year old has been running back and forth for 15-30 minutes at a time. She is completely focused on her activity. She goes to preschool and is extremely shy. I am getting very concerned with this running back and forth. According to her teachers, she is bright and pays attention in school. She only does this running when she is home. I read all the stories, but did anyone get a reason for this behavior? Is it bottled up energy that needs to be released? Is it a disorder? Thanks to all of you, I know I am not alone.

Jan 01, 2010
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Sounds so familiar
by: Anonymous

Hi, my son who is 6 years old does this and has been doing this along with other thing since he entered toddlerhood. The first thing we noticed was that he would like up toys in a line and would freak out if one of those toys was moved. Then we noticed he would run and hum, we also thought this was because he was bored. I would bring this up at his yearly checkups and all doctors said it was ok that nothing was "wrong", that he was developing normally. It wasn't until my son entered the school system that someone told us it was NOT normal. We had him evaluated by our school psychiatrist and they told us that it was most likely high-functioning autism. That was in preschool when he was 4. We decided to wait it out to see if it was due to lack of social interactions w/ other children his age.

When he entered kindergarten he didn't improved much. So he was fully evaluated by the school psych and diagnosed with PDD-NOS because he didn't fully fit any of the requirements for a specific diagnosis. Since then I have been searching high and low about getting him help for his sensory issues (sound and flashing lights) and for his running and humming and social issues. We lived in Europe at the time and didn't have a lot of access to Biomedical treatments. So I did LOTS of research and started giving him vitamins. His teachers were amazed in the change in him. He was playing with other students and improving on his schoolwork and his humming and running(stimming) decreased.

Now that we live back in the US I have been getting the proper vitamins I need for him and am looking into taking him to a DAN! doctor. I have started him on Attention Gels by MRM (bought at Vitamin Shoppe) and I have noticed an EXTREAM change in his behavior, especially in his running and humming. You have to give 1 gelcap (or powder) 3 times a day. I have noticed that w/in 30 minutes of giving this he stops running/humming and actually sits and watches cartoons, looks at books, plays his DS. Then when its time for his next dose he starts running and humming again, and "misbehaving".

I would HIGHLY recommend that anyone who has any sort of doubt or concern about their child to FIGHT for help. Do not take "everything is fine" from your doctor if you have a feeling that everything is not fine. Your child can be helped and treated. Autism isn't as scary as you think it is. The spectrum is so wide that even ADD and ADHD is on the autistic spectrum!!! so PLEASE take your child to a specialist and get them seen and the help that they need, especially before school starts.

Dec 30, 2009
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Help is on the way
by: Kathy

My grandson is almost three and has been showing signs of having sensory difficulties since he was about 2 and his little sister was born. His language is delayed, he flies anything in the air like an airplane and has had difficulty controlling his emotions and is set off very easily. A friend and cranio-sacral practitioner recently referred us to a center in Denver called Unique Prints that specializes in sensory disorders. Over the month of December we have had him evaluated at Unique Prints by an experienced OT and now have a very intensive (and impressive) plan of care to follow to address his "holes." I would strongly encourage parents having similar difficulties to look at the website unique-prints.com and talk to someone to find out what resources to look for if you are not near to the Denver area. As always, early intervention is important. We feel strongly that God has led us to this place and want to share the same opportunity with others. Our children are so precious to each of us!

Dec 27, 2009
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Scared
by: Single Mommy

My son is 4. He has been running and humming since he was about 2.5. At first I thought maybe it was when he was bored cause it was if his movie was over or after we were done playing a game or whatever. Now it is more consistent and frankly its becoming very annoying. He has no issue learning. He knows letters, numbers, colors, his name, recognizes shapes, people, animals, etc. I dont think it is autism but I am gettin scared cause I DONT know what it is. I have talked to Dr's about it and they say its nothing to worry about but he never does this around them so they dont see it! They are just going off what i am telling them he does. I should record it but its so random i never know when to record him! Im sorry for rambling!

I finally found this site where someone knows what I am goin thro! Does anyone have advice on the questions I should be asking my son's dr? Is there any ideas on what i can do at home to help him? When he starts school will it get better or worse? Has anyones kids out grown this? any help at all would be greatly appreciated. Im just so scared.

Oct 20, 2009
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Running & Humming, No Toys
by: Anonymous

My daughter does that but with no toys. She is five years old and has been doing it as long as i can remember. My wife and just recently started to discuss that it might be for reasons other that what we all call "exercise." She will just get up from drawing or eating or even playing with toys and start the running thing. Does your daughter put her head down whilst running?

Oct 05, 2009
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Don't overreact
by: Anonymous

The vast majority of disorder "symptoms" describe all children in one way or another. Only in cases of extreme behavior is there a cause for concern. Defining "extreme" is also important in pursuit of diagnosis as well.

Sep 13, 2009
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My original post regarding humming/growling
by: Anonymous

I originally posted (a while back) about my 4 1/2 year old son running around and humming. He is now 5 and in kindergarten! Since I last posted his symptoms heightened in frequency and severity and we took him in for another eval. He was recently diagnosed with asperger's. He also has some sensory issues and some anxiety.

Being an educator I am very concerned about how he will do in school and whether these conditions will affect his learning or the learning of others. I sent copies of his evaluations to the director of student services and we are meeting next week to discuss further academic evals for him. In the meantime he has been given a ball chair to sit in, a visual schedule is being created for him and he will be part of the morning occupational therapy group. I feel that the school is trying to work with me and hopefully he will be successful!

Sep 13, 2009
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running back and forth
by: Anonymous

Our son has SPD and has gone to occupational therapy for over a year. He recently "graduated" and no longer goes to OT, but he still displays some SPD traits. He still hates haircuts, periodically stands on his tiptoes, and has now started running back and forth in our house repeatedly several times a day.

Feb 03, 2009
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Running and humming too
by: Tisha

My son, 2yrs old was recently diagnosed with SPD. He runs up and down our hallway most of the time, clapping his hands also. He too also makes the humming and growling sound. It's nice to see someone else describe exactly what I see everyday!!

I've been on the computer all day trying to do some research about this disorder. I found that some of the signs overlap with signs seen in children who are in the autism spectrum. Can anyone be more clear on the differences?

Feb 01, 2009
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S P D or atypical autism ????s
by: ray in connecticut

Our son has been doing this running back and forth and humming as he does so since the age of 2. He is now 6. In a given day he will do this 5 to 10 times just out of the blue start running back and forth. Otherwise he SEEMS completely normal to us.

He was born premature by 6 weeks. He does NOT do this at school nor did he do it at day care. He only does it at home whether inside or outside. I'd appreciate anyone familiar with this type of symptom to please contact me at:

retlaw99_21@yahoo.com

I'd like to converse with others experiencing these symptoms in their children.

thank you.

Nov 15, 2008
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Humming
by: Anonymous

Our son is now 4 1/2 and he has been humming since he was about 2. He usually has a toy or toys in his hands and also likes to flick them, wave them around in the air or "fly" them around.

When he originally started this at 2 years old, we just thought he was being "creative" by making inanimate objects such as legos or blocks into airplanes. We thought this was very intuitive of him. At the same time his twin brothers were born so a lot of changes were going on and his humming was overlooked for a while.

Now that he is older and in preschool we have taken him to several specialists to find out why he is doing these things. We do know he has some sensory processing issues, but we are also looking at atypical autism or pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified.

It's been a long journey and we are still on it, but we just want to help him be successful and get him any support that he needs. Getting him occupational therapy is very difficult because he doesn't have any other special education needs so schools don't often service children with just O.T. We are still working on it! I hope you get some more answers and support!

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