Schooling solutions

by Holly
(Hagerstown, MD USA)

My daughter has a terrible time with public school, Is home schooling better for children with Sensory Disorders?

Comments for Schooling solutions

Average Rating starstarstarstarstar

Click here to add your own comments

Aug 13, 2011
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
4 different schools . Found the one that has saved our family
by: Anonymous

After two public schools failing miserably . We tried homeschooling it did help but it was not for me. As my child has lots of energy and I don't I am often tired and need my space a little time out from my child. I couldn't go on he really wanted friends but was severely depressed and huge anxiety. The result now has changed my life we go to a fantastic school and I feel the need to brag about it . As he no longer needs aids or helpers or has behavior issues. The anxiety and everything is gone . He has friends and great teachers and yes its a private school.

We drive an hour each way to get to it and sold the car and brought a bomb to pay for the fees . They are very reasonable at over a 1000 a term . They have caring loving staff and have 11 staff to just over 90 kids. I love the school and the principal and everything they have brought to my family . The strict routine and structure has meant the problem with transitioning for my child is gone and everything is followed to routines.

My childs progress in just over a term is nothing short of a miracle and the dedication of the staff . They continually present him with awards and make a huge fuss over the smallest things. My child has gone through 4 schooling systems to find this . I have cried and cried and tried to help . We have tried every therapy . The best one is acceptance of my child for who he is and the gifts he brings. Yes we are also on a strict sensory diet. We are not of the same religion as the school but the opened up their hearts and truly believe in helping children. If you are ever needing a caring nurturing environment . When all else fails go to a Adventist school . they are every where around the world. The fees i would pay a hundred times over . I can never thank the staff enough . Sorry if my writing is terrible i have dyslexia.

Hurstville Adventist school has saved my family.

Jan 08, 2011
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Sensory diet in school
by: Anonymous

My daughter had a sensory diet on her IEP which was administered only through OT two times a week; It wasn't enough so we had her evaluated privately for OT. The OT developed a sensory diet for her in school. The school hired an aide to help her with her diet, specifically if she needed to leave the room for sensory breaks. It was a TOTAL disaster. Our daughter's behavior, frustration and anxiety became much worse. WHY? unbeknown to us, the aide was being used to remove my daughter from class for any and all behaviors, whether they were sensory related or not. She was spending more time out of the class than in and was being directed to do sensory activities at times when she did not really need them. A positive relationship never developed between my daughter and the aide and we ended up requesting a change in aide. Lesson learned- You MUST have the sensory diet and the role of any aide spelled out on the IEP so it can be properly administered and evaluated.

Oct 16, 2010
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
to classroom accom.
by: Anonymous

WOW! Where do you teach so I can move? My children need you!
Why aren't more teachers aware of these needs instead of feeling "irritated" by IEPs and special needs? I am shocked by the lack of compassion- even by my child's spec ed pre-K teacher.
Thank you for caring.

Oct 11, 2010
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
SPD Accom. Can Happen in Public Schools
by: classroom accom.

My general fourth grade classroom in a public school contains: 2 bean bag chairs for students to lay on or under during instruction or work time, 5x7 area rug to lay on during instr. or work time, 2 disks for seats, extra seating for any child to move to a new location if needed (students don't have to ask to move), 4 sensory diet breaks scheduled for 2 SPD kids, tight spaces for kids to squeeze into during instruction, 1 exercise ball to use in place of a chair, 1 full time aide coverage including lunch, recess, and specials, and probably more adaptations than I'm thinking of now. Yes, I'm a teacher with two young kids in the spectrum and I have a spec ed background. I get 'it' and 'live it'.

The class' responsibility is to use the above options as learning tools and not toys. They have to actively show they are engaged in the room. Sometimes instruction and work periods are missed due to sensory diet breaks. However, if the child has a sensory overload they aren't learning anything. Neuro-typical kids are benefiting because their unidentified needs are being met. I'm known as a highly structured classroom teacher. I teach in a small rural school that is financially struggling in a huge way. SPD accommodations can happen in school. Get your OT to write up a sensory diet for school and implement it into the IEP. God Bless You and Your Family

Oct 07, 2010
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Dealing with the same struggle....
by: Anonymous

I too am dealing with the 'Public School vs. Child with SPD' issue. I could have easily written the same words as the author of "Doing What Is Best for Your Child". I do not have the finances to give up my job (as a teacher) in order to stay home and homeschool my child. I would like to, but I simply cannot afford to do so. As such, we are at the mercy of our school district. What I am learning is that (1) SPD is not a Learning Disability; most SPD kids are very bright! :) But (2) 504's are too frequently ignored (due to ignorance on the teacher's part). It is best to have your child "classified" as Special Ed, with "Other Health Impaired: SENSORY PROCESSING DISORDER", which will give your child an IEP specifically addressing his/her sensory needs. With the IEP, the teacher is legally bound to offer "modifications" to your child's classroom environment (such as "fidgets"). Get an OT to put in print that your child must have sensory input frequently throughout the day with "Functional OT therapy" provided by the school, then take the written statement to your Child Study Team. They legally must provide your child with FAPE: A Free Appropriate Public Education.
It is truly an emotionally exhausting journey to find a teacher/classroom environment that supports your child's continuously changing sensory needs, but what choice do we have?! If we don't advocate for our children, no one else will! Remember, to the untrained eye, the kid with SPD just looks like a bad kid with bad behavior!!! We have to educate these teachers on behalf of our children!

Oct 05, 2010
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Do What is Best for the Child
by: Anonymous

I am going through the same difficulties with my son in public school. He is in first grade and has a wonderful teacher who wanted to learn more about SPD so that she could help him in the classroom. However, I know that public schools are not designed for students with SPD even though teachers are supposed to utilize various strategies and modify so that children with issues can also be successful in the classroom. Most times it is easier said than done...and this comes from my own background as an elementary school teacher. I know how difficult it is to work with twenty-five plus children, making sure that every one of their needs are met. It is not an easy task. Having said that, I have decided to pull my son out of public school and begin homeschooling him. My thoughts are that it doesn't hurt to try it, and if I don't feel it is working then I will put him back in public school. I do know that I have to do what is best for my child. I hate seeing him come home from school after having a bad day in the classroom and on the school bus...it usually leads to a meltdown at home. Those days I feel as though my son doesn't feel secure in any of his environments, and that breaks my heart.

I hope you are able to find what works best for your child. There are so many great websites and books out there on homeschooling.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to The SPD Q & A.