SPD and child custody and visitation

by Mrs. TAS
(Pa)

How does Sensory Processing Disorder, and other disabilities like it, factor in when court officials and parents are making child custody decisions?


How does the court view and take in to account disabilities like SPD?

For example: overnight visits with the non custodial parent, week long, or longer, vacations, and making legal/medical/education decisions together (which is especially difficult to do if the non custodial parent does not believe in disabilities like SPD).

If anyone has had any experiences in this type of situation I would appreciate your feedback/advice.

Comments for SPD and child custody and visitation

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Aug 15, 2015
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Heartbreaking
by: Anonymous

So far the court doesn't get it at all.in the 3 weeks of visitations with sleepovers my 3 yr old has gone straight down hill and is exhausted. I filed an emergency screening request and I will go back with speech and ot reports and a report from a dev pediatrician doctor. Supposedly a dr they will listen to. I pray with all those people as witnessess I can get my daughter back in my custody and get her back in track. Dad and his side have zero clue .it's almost insulting the things they say.
I'm going to talk to my congressmen about it

Apr 16, 2011
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Sensory Processing Disorder and custody
by: Anonymous

My experience is that California courts do not recognize or take into consideration Sensory Processing Disorder. It is not well known, nor well understood. It is seen as a parent's false attempt to restrict the other parent. Unfortunately, the way the courts are set up tends to go against everything your SPD child needs to feel balanced and safe. The court orders psychological therapy, which only seems to make matters worse for your child (mine had 3 court ordered therapists at once!). Your child's "a-typical" behavior is viewed as bad, "helicopter" parenting or as a red flag that you are unfairly trying to restrict the other parent. It is very destructive to the child, and no one understands. Mine has not recovered.

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