SPD symptom?

by Sarah
(Maine)

My 7 y/o daughter was diagnosed with SPD at age 5 and has received OT off and on since then. She's got classic proprioceptive dysfunction, and hints of other dysfunctions - she doesn't sleep, doesn't like socks, has a hard time staying focused, tying her shoes is a chore, prefers to eat with her hands, and is incredibly sweet, smart & sensitive - you know the drill.


Last night while reading before bed time she started making a flicking movement with her hands, which looked kind of like a tick. She repeated the movement several times before I asked her why she was doing that. She explained that sometimes she thinks about something so much (right now the obsession is dogs, dog breeds, anything dog related)that she visualizes the object and has to fling it away. Okay, I've come to accept SPD and even embrace the quirks, but this one freaked me out! It feels more like OCD than SPD - though it happened at the end of the day, when I know she is particularly wound from the days stimulation...

Anyone else have a similar story to share?? I've put a call in to the Family Dr. and her OT for a check in, but I'm hoping this isn't as freaky as it sounds!!

Comments for SPD symptom?

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Jul 06, 2010
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THANKS!
by: Anonymous

It's so nice to know that there are people OUT THERE who read and respond, empathize and help to explain through their own experiences. I am starting to think this new behaviour is a kind of coping skill, as it started just after school let out for the summer and with the transition to the day care setting and schedule (or lack there of). I am anxiously awaiting the OT visit later this week!

Jul 04, 2010
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Coping thing?
by: Bonnie

So I was just thinking that I have heard several therapist give children visualization things just like that as a way to cope or to deal with aspects of spd, anxiety, etc. For example children who stress about shots, I have heard them recommend taking a pinwheel to blow really hard on while getting the shot as it helps them stay calm and sends correct sensory input to the brain to override the incorrect level of fear. Many children no longer bring the pinwheel after a few times but still visualize the pinwheel and blow really hard when experiencing shots or any other stress. Another example is when kids can get to sleep at night due to over active mind or anxiety about something that happened or is going to happen. Therapist often tell the child to draw a picture of the thoughts or write them down and then either throw the paper away or if the child stresses over the idea of throwing it away putting it in a binder or book that it stays in at least till the morning. The idea is the the child no longer has to think about it since the they got it out and onto paper and then got rid of it. So maybe it is a good way for your daughter to clear her mind of something. It could be a good coping mechanism. Just a thought.

Jun 30, 2010
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similar story
by: Anonymous

Yes, we deal with the same things with my son. Each day seems to bring something different along with the same sensory defensiveness he has everyday. He was diagnosed with OCD and ADHD but was just recently diagnosed with SPD and visual motor delays. Many, many, many of the SPD symptoms we see in him may be perceived as OCD and maybe the 2 go hand in hand. It is my experience (unfortunately) that most doctors don't know much. Finding a doctor with expertise on SPD is what we have been searching for. The best thing we have found is to go by your gut on how to deal with each behavior and what your child responds to best. The sensory diet approach works well for my son and since your little one seems to verbally express her thoughts of what is going on I would ask her what makes her feel calm, relaxes her mind, makes her feel less anxious, etc. I am glad to have found this sight and I hope my response may help you in some way.

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