THANK YOU A LOT

Have you ever noticed that 90% of these alleged "symptoms" are NORMAL ACTIVITIES or things people (including kids) NORMALLY may or may not like, and that if you would grab ANY person on the street (Anyone), you would be able to label that person as a SPD sufferer, according to your infinite checklist?


Thanks, now I know where they take these things from.

Have you ever met a child? Do you have at least one? Were you a child at some point of your life, or have you just forgotten?

I bet you have A LOT of these symptoms yourself.

Do you have SPD?

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Jun 03, 2015
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so good
by: Jerac

A lot of support is needed when it comes to such problems. Only then would the patient be able to build up some self-confidence and have the ability to flight whichever the disease may be. It is a common feeling that would help all patients.

Oct 06, 2009
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seriously?
by: Anonymous

I am 22 years old and for years no one could determine what was "wrong" with me. Finally they decided on ADHD but even that didn't seem to fit. Sounds scared me, I cried when my parents touched me, I would not eat anything at room temperature, I wiped of grandma's kisses and to this day I hate to wear socks. Actually I don't think I have in a few months... I checked off almost every hyper sensitive symptom on that checklist.

Yes, all children can get overloaded... Actually any person can. The trick here is that some kids do it to an abnormal level that interferes with their daily living. When you can't go to the movies, out to things with your friends, or lick an envelope because the taste stays in your mouth for hours, that crosses a line. When you almost panic thinking about being on a roller coaster or when you push someone away because they barely touched you that is not normal. When everything is three times as bright, three times as loud, three times as sweet, etc that can really start to interfere with daily life. Every child is going to have things that bother them, for kids like me, EVERYTHING bothers them.

Parents are always going to make excuses for poor parenting and want a way out of things that does not include them or their child taking responsibility for behavior. As has happened with ADHD a lot of parents are going to try to use this to cover up children's bad behaviors or make excuses when a child really just needs discipline. That said, there is a group of us who need some help. There are actually a few people who cope with something that can seem like fireworks going off in the middle of a crinkly bag with sugar water filling the air in addition to whatever you are supposed to be concentrating on every day. Regardless of what you want to call it, the issue is real and it affects real people every day.

Apr 18, 2009
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Highly offended
by: Anonymous

I envy the amount of free time you have to surf the net and look up "conditions" that you can slam. I on the other hand do not have free time. My time is spent taking my son to paed, OT and physio appointments. The fact that my son has hypotonic muscles is not a result of our bad parenting, nor is it because he has poor diet or exposure to too much television.

We do not medicate him, nor do we choose to label him. He has a NEUROLOGICAL condition, not caused by US. I am a lawyer and his father is an engineer. Our son is educated in a private school, he is in the top 10 centile for IQ in his age group and he is able to read 2 years ahead of his age group. The fact that he cannot hold a pencil properly, or that he bumps into things and cannot lift his legs properly do not make him a bad child and us bad parents.

If you wish to make a point, perhaps you could do it with some degree of sensitivity. Perhaps if you got out more you could come across people who have SPD and then you realize they're not just a little sensitive or precious.

Mar 17, 2009
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Through their eyes
by: Zoey {mom of Lazarus}

I think the point is that to have SPD or SI you would have many of the symptoms on the checklist not just a few. It may be many in one area or all over the board but it would still be more extreme than NORMAL childhood sensitivities. I am sure that in this day and age we all have some sensory issues, it's crazy out there but these kids are different. NOT dumb, not bad just different. My son couldn't handle most clothes for the first 5 years of his life, they hurt not bugged and that is just a small sampling with children with these issues. Bless you for questioning though because if we had not questioned he would have never gotten any help.
Z

Dec 05, 2008
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Medical metaphors
by: Bob Collier

"It is obvious that neither you nor the other poster have actually been around children with sensory issues, or you would plainly see the difference. It is a neurological issue, not behavioral."

As a matter of fact, I've worked with autistic children and with mentally handicapped children generally.

This page may be of interest:

http://www.kernschoolpsych.org/octkog25.htm



Dec 04, 2008
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Illness?
by: Anonymous

Never said my daughter had an illness... I said she has sensory issues that are being dealt with thru OT. She IS sensitive to things other children are not and it can be disruptive to her daily living. We are helping her, not labeling her, not medicating her, but respecting her issues and helping her find coping mechanisms that work for her and ways to let us know when she is overwhelmed so we can help her to process.

Does she have SPD? I don't know, I don't think so. I think she is slower to process certain external stimuli (sounds, etc...) When you go into a theater, the sound can be overwhelming at first, but most people acclimate quickly. My daughter would need extra time than everyone else in the group.(a hypothetical example) That is just her and I respect her for it. But I would be remiss as a mother if I dumped her in the theater and just expected her to deal with it...remiss and cruel. The right thing would be to prepare her before hand and show her where the exits are if it is more than she can handle. That is what Occupational Therapy and a school/home team approach that respect the child's needs are for.


There is no doubt you have had some distressing things happen to you and your loved ones, but I think you are projecting. I have to say, I take offense at your questioning my parenting skills and intellect. I an extensive education in several fields, have homeschooled & have now sent them into limited external schooling, while I focus on my own health issues. I do not consider sensory issues an illness and find that idea repugnant. I do believe there is a neuro glitch which affects how sensory input is processed systemically and I feel it is my duty to help my daughter face the world and its expectations for her fully armed.

She is a delightful child who I love and respect - I have no desire to change anything about her, even her 'issues' to me are endearing - but I absolutely recognize the validity of her feelings and could never tell her she is not feeling what she says (or shows) she is feeling. If she says that is what she is feeling, it is true for her.

I will not allow anyone to disrespect her feelings, label her or judge her against some preconceived idea of what a child should be. This is my last post as I simply see no need for further discourse.

Dec 04, 2008
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SPEAKING ABOUT ASSUMING
by: DW

I guess YOU are assuming a lot there.
The fact is that I do have a 6 year-old boy, first diagnosed with something similar to SPD, and then, with PDD-NOS, although NOBODY (family -both my parents ARE doctors, we are all University teachers-, friends -most of them professionals and teachers-, his Pediatrician -Head of Pediatrics at Children's Hospital-) saw anything wrong with him, but schools. The labeling stopped when our Psychologist took all the reports and call the new school Psychologist and told her what to expect from our child and how to interpret it, instead of making wrong assumptions about him. They treated him as a normal child, and he behaved as a normal child.

Regarding Fibromyalgia, I've had a torax pain for 8 years, I couldn't even breathe properly. Being the daughter of two doctors, it was very difficult for me to make his colleagues pay attention. After 7 years of scanning my torax and finding nothing, they decided I had that. They treated me with the same drugs they treat terminally ill cancer patients for months. Do you know you are in serious risk of becoming and addict when you take drugs you don't need?

And you know what? I've had DVT (Deep Venous Thrombosis). I was in death risk everyday for 8 years. Among other veins, my Inferior Cava was obstructed in a 30%. There it was, but nobody saw it. The pain was produced by the clots hitting my lungs like a machine gun.

So, excuse me if I don't agree with you. Being more or less sensitive to something is NOT an illness. I invite you to read the list of symptoms again and note how is as BOTH wrong to like hugs, sounds, dirt, etc. (hyper) or not (hypo).

For the good sake of your child, THINK!

Dec 04, 2008
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assumptions
by: Anonymous

You are assuming alot there... my daughter who has sensory issues (I do not say SPD, as I am not sure, she is w/ OT overcoming many of her issues) is not on any meds... I know several folks whose children are autistic, have Asperger's or sensory issues and not a one of them is on meds, as there are no meds that will benefit those particular children.

It is obvious that neither you nor the other poster have actually been around children with sensory issues, or you would plainly see the difference. It is a neurological issue, not behavioral. I have an autoimmune disease which affects my skin among other things. My brain processes many things as an attack on my body and tells my immune system to attack. So, sometimes, a simple touch is perceived as pain and my skin will become red and inflamed. Is that behavioral?

It is similar for my daughter... sometimes her brain interprets the outside world in an inappropriate way (pain & sound are magnified, her sense of how to move her body in space is underdeveloped so she will not always move correctly, etc...)

This is the same mindset which denied CMS, Fibromyalgia, Aids, etc... until the specific genes were found (and in the case of fibro, many still deny it despite the scientific evidence). Just because you have not seen something does not mean it does not exist and just because something is not clearly defined does not mean it is not valid.

Dec 04, 2008
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I can't believe my eyes
by: DW

I cant' believe what I read in this pages. You can't be serious about thinking your children are ill because they get upset.
I invite you to look at this web site, that will explain what I want to say.

http://www.fightforkids.org/Psychiatric_Drugs_and_Your_Childs_Future.pdf

It's exactly what happens to our kids

Nov 27, 2008
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Invented umbrella terms etc
by: Anonymous

It seems to me 'sensory processing disorder' (which I won't reify by capitalizing the phrase's initial letters) is an invented 'single cause' for behavior generated by a wide range of contributing factors, much the same as my own invented 'psychiatric label' Sleep Impairment Disorder:

www.adhd-report.com/adhd-exist.html

Re the page at this website "Is SPD a Real Diagnosis?", for "comorbidity" see on the above page: ""SID may be linked to excessive TV watching". Or nutrition, or bad parenting, or poor air quality, or stress, or industrial noise, yada, yada, yada, whichever of the many hundreds of options is flavor of the month. Of course, it's the thing that 'SID' is 'linked to' that's the real reason for the sleep problem. We both know how this supposed
'neurological dysfunction' was created, right?"

Same perceptual trick as the idea of "comorbidity".

Except in my example, the associations are made to observable behavior described in everyday language not to similar invented phrases that also suggest a 'single cause' where none has ever been demonstrated.

There's a lot to be said for describing behavior in everyday language. I do it all the time. One of the positive side effects of that is that I recognize behavioral 'disorders' for the flim flam they are.

Nov 26, 2008
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A BIG difference
by: Anonymous

SPD is about as related to personal preferences as OCD is to routine. We are not talking quirks or preferences, but a neurological disorder that disrupts an individual's ability to function on a daily basis, not a kid who prefers tagless shirts.

I have 3 kids... one who has preferences (he loves loud noises & hubbub, hates tags and spicy food) and one who has SPD and trust me, they are NOT even close to being the same thing!

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