Treating SPD in teenagers

My son is 12, almost 13. He's always had issues consistent with SPD (tactile sensitivity, strong fear of noise and crowds, among others). We've always thought of it as quirks. Some things he has either seemed to grow out of or adjust to. Now, in dealing with a 7 year old with some of the same as well as well as others, ADHD, and possible Aspergers, that he is being treated for, we are now finding out that my older son's problems are a real diagnosable condition that can be treated. My question is, can a child that has never been diagnosed, or treated, be treated at the age of 13? I feel weird just now getting with a doctor on this, but, honestly, we never knew it was something that could be treated til now. How do teens go about getting diagnosed and treated and does starting so late to treat him cause significant problems in helping him deal with this?

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Jul 23, 2011
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Never too late
by: Debbie

My daughter was 26 before she was diagnosed with ADD and other issues. I knew something was wrong but back in those days ( she is 36 now) there was not as much information. After she finally accepted that she had a diagnosable problem, she began taking medication and received therapy. It has made a huge difference in her life. I so wish we had known at age 13. She made lots of major life decisions based on impulsively and it has created some serious consequences. Having said all that, I am very thankful that we found out and got her help. It is never too late! Good luck!

Jul 23, 2011
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Never too late
by: Anonymous

It is never too late. Ok, if you're no longer breathing, then maybe you're too late, hehe. Seriously, though, I didn't start getting any serious, continued treatment for SPD until I was 20 years old and have still seen my life improve in so many ways.

Don't give up. There is always hope. All this means is he now has extra baggage that's been picked up from years of living with these issues. Treatment can still have a major impact, especially if you start treating it now in puberty.

Hope that helps.
- Dan
spdsupport.org

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