Lashing out at peers

by worried
(UK)

My son is 7 years old and we have been looking for an explanation for his behaviour since he was a baby. Having had ASD ruled out we have recently been referred to an OT and are waiting for an appointment. Looking at the checklist he scores high in 8 of the areas particularly in Proprioceptive dysfunction, auditory dys, emotional dys, play dys and self regulation.


He is performing poorly at school despite being a bright child but more worryingly to us is his behaviour towards his peers as he frequently lashes out for no apparent reason, either in anger and frustration or just simply because they are there. The other day he banged together the heads of 2 of his classmates for no apparent reason, and was unable to explain his behaviour. His school are very supportive and understanding and needless to say we have tried punishments, incentives, talking through with him how other children feel etc. I haven't seen much evidence of this sort of behaviour in other posts and wonder if anyone else has encountered this problem and can offer any advice.

HELP!

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Jun 26, 2010
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Still waiting for OT appointment
by: Worried - update

My son is now 8 and we are still waiting for an appointment with an OT, I think it will be about a year from referral by the time he is assessed (unfortunately a limitation of UK Health service). However, since moving up to Junior School in september, his behaviour has improved enormously. I believe this is partly down to his fantastic teachers, partly down to his increasing maturity and partly due to implementing some of the techniques I have heard about for SPD (eg. I now lie on him every night before he goes to sleep!). There are still problems but things are definitely improving and I am hoping that when he finally is assessed we will be given further therapies to try. It has been enormously helpful to read other peoples comments and experiences through these posts and realise his problems are not unique. Thanks to everyone who has commented.

Jun 23, 2010
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ditto
by: Anonymous

My son is 11.5 yrs. Today while reading on this site for about the last 6 hours, I've also been jotting down things it made me remember. My son was a fussy baby. Around 3 years old we both felt like maybe something was a little off. At 4 years we thought maybe some ADHD. At 5 years old and in Kindergarten, he was in the principals office on the 3rd day of school. It was all down hill from there. Oh, and they diagnosed him ADHD/Bipolar. He has not been in a "regular" classroom since mid Kindergarten and was moved to a different campus in 2nd grade. Initially we thought the school was supportive.

Recently I am noticing a pattern of them trying to shove us out the door with their paper trail. In 2008 I requested an OT eval b/c I then and now feel there is something to the deep pressure or restriction. They said they did testing, but a couple months ago I realized the testing they did was not OT related at all but they said it was!He has an extensive history of behaviors requiring restraint. I think that COULD be a subconscious payoff. Worst case scenario, NOTHING else had worked at the time. We recently got him home from a private placement which helped tremendously and placed him back at his previous campus. Prior to school getting out there was a period of a few weeks where he showed some physical aggression at school.

At home over the last 5 months, there has been 2 minor incidents at home mainly some pushing. He frequently requests for either me or dad to lay on him also. I'm not saying sensory issues is the main driving cause of my son's problems, but what if some minor tweaking with it made a difference?? It can't hurt. I am again pursuing OT evaluations.

Mar 18, 2010
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This could be my son
by: exhausted mom

My youngest child was born 2 months early, and had a skull fracture at 8 months. He has always been "different", as he needs to be watched all the time. He is always on the go, never walks, even in the house. He spins, lashes out unprovoked (and without anger), always making some kind of noise, but yet terrified of the noise of toilets and other things. Extremely impulsive, his nickname is Mr. Danger. He is very social, preferring adults. He functions "ok" in school in the morning with lots of direction, but after being around lots of kids in the lunchroom, afternoons he spends doing his own thing in the classroom, but still manages to learn. They have done testing on him with no official diagnosis yet (waiting for the doc),and I'm afraid he will be labeled ADHD, without ruling out other possibilities first. My biggest concerns are the hitting and impulsivity, as he has no fear and will walk up to a six grader and hit him/her. (My son is in kindergarten)

Feb 01, 2010
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Same Situation
by: Anonymous

I have a 5 yr old son who is doing the same things you listed. As I was reading your post, I felt like I could've been the one writing it! I have JUST recently started looking into the fact my son may have SPD.

Sep 26, 2009
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try to find out what's goiong on
by: father of four

It's great that the school is so supportive. That will make an enormous difference. He may be feeling overwhelmed and is reacting to that. Our SPD son would often retaliate in the playground, e.g. when jostled lining up, and unfortunately the school was not as understanding. Your OT should help you find out what sorts of things are upsetting him and assist in coming up with strategies for how to deal with this. It sounds like you are on the right path so keep going.

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