SPD And Language Delays

by Jessi
(Texas)

My son, AJ, was recently diagnosed with the following:


1. Developmental Delay (not pervasive)
2. Mixed Receptive/Expressive Language Disorder
3. Idiosyncratic Autistic Behaviors (not Autistic)
4. Sensory Integration Dysfunction

This week we went to a Children's Therapy center and AJ was evaluated for speech therapy and OT. He will begin getting both therapies, twice a week, next week.

My question has to do with his language skills. So much of what I have read on this site and others, is very helpful, but there is virtually no mention of children, like AJ, who have SPD and also a language disorder. I feel sometimes that he suffers even more because much of the time he cannot even tell me what is bothering him. He is almost 3 1/2 and has finally picked up some words, but he is still very difficult to understand most of the time.

I suppose I just wondered if there were some parents out there who had this problem who could offer me some advice about what to do when he is out of control and cannot tell me what is causing problems for him.

Since reading (a ton!) of information about SPD, I have found that when he's upset, it helps to just lay on top of him. I remembered that he always likes to hug me that way at night, and when he wakes up at night, he lays on top of me. However, being able to calm him down doesn't address the issue that I often don't know what set him off in the first place.

Just for background info:

AJ, as a baby, reached many of his milestones just before it was time to really worry. For example, he sat up at 9 months, army crawled until 12 months when he finally got on all fours, then walked at 16 months.

As far as language goes, it seemed apparent to me that he was behind, but people (and doctors I might add) would tell me he was just a boy, and launch into a story about how their son/grandson/nephew/etc. didn't talk until they were three years old.

Problem is, 3 has come and gone, and he is just now beginning to understand some things, but still doesn't talk understandably very much. ECI worked with us from the time he was 2 until he was 3, at which time he was evaluated by the school and I was informed that he no longer required any more help. (Never mind that I've now been told by a developmental pediatrician that he has the language skills of a 24 month old!) So we are waiting to be reevaluated for that. He did make some huge improvements from 2 to 3, but they all had to do with his social skills.

I have since realized that he was experiencing some trauma due to the life we lived when I was still married to his father, and now that we have removed ourselves from that situation, he is much happier.

So that's us, and I would love to get any suggestions any of you have to offer. Or just to read your story. Sometimes I feel a little down when all I read about is "gifted" children who have SPD. AJ may not be "gifted" as far as speaking and learning goes, but he is a gift in all the lives that he is a part of.


A language disorder AND SPD is so common! You are definitely NOT alone by any stretch of the imagination.

The differences and underlying causes of receptive/expressive language disorders and auditory processing delays, since we very frequently see auditory processing issues in our SPD kiddos.

A receptive/expressive language disorder can coexist with auditory processing issues but one would not 'cause' the other. Auditory processing may look like a receptive language delay to some degree, however, with a comprehensive evaluation it should be possible to determine which is the primary deficit.

For "central auditory processing" which I assume is the type of auditory processing you are referring to-- where the brain does not always process the auditory message correctly (not to be confused w/ a hearing loss because they would have normal hearing acuity) that is diagnosed by an audiologist and requires that the child be 8 years of age for the assessment to be most reliable (some audiologists will do it earlier but the reason for waiting has to do with maturation of the neural pathways).

Given her son's age, other diagnoses, and the expressive language disorder, as well as receptive, I would not suspect an auditory processing delay at this time.

As far as an underlying cause for the language disorder that could be any number of factors!

Hope that makes some sense and is helpful.

Keep those words in mind as he matures... auditory processing, as it may be something to keep your eye on. Information regarding auditory processing, even now, in my opinion, may very well help you.

It is common with SPD kiddos who have difficulty processing any of so many types of sensory input and messages. Some of the tips and tricks for helping kids with language disorders such as your son's can also be similar to those with an auditory processing delay, so I thought you may find more information about other kids with SPD and language delays by doing some research into this as well.

Even though it is NOT the diagnosis he has, or may ever have, the information may still be "relevant".

One more thought regarding treatment and help... please make sure the OT and SLP are both addressing the underlying SPD in his treatment sessions. Watch what they do in therapy and do the same things at home. Get involved in the therapy as much as you possibly can. And get a good home program going that complements what they do in his therapy sessions. Progress will be much faster the more invested you are.

Your experiences with your son are very common and with the help of therapy and other parents who share similar struggles, things WILL get better, they will. Your relationship and understanding of him will only get better from here with therapy.



Comments for SPD And Language Delays

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Apr 10, 2016
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What do I do to stop anger
by: Lisa

My grandbaby has the same thing. What helped was when she got upset becausewe couldn't understand we tell her show me and I take her hand. She brings me to the item and I understand most the time what she wants.then I repeat back to her the words she should of used to reinforce her verbal skills. She has increase in vocabulary since we started doing this.good luck

Dec 23, 2014
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Autism or SPD
by: Anonymous

Hi guys. My daughter has been tactile defensive since she was a baby. I believe she has sensory dysfunction which is causing her social and language delays. She doesn't have any other autistic characteristics. She is in early intervention but I am afraid they are not listening to my maternal instinct. I believe she has audio processing issue because she is trying to repeat words after me but looks at me puzzled and repeats every word I say with her same word over and over. I have a feeling she can't decode my words. Anyway I will take her to an audiologist. But what I really want to ask some of you is how where your children diagnosed with SPD. How did the diagnostician actually know whether it's SPD or mild Autism. It's so confusing as many sources list same symptoms. So how will I know if my daughter is misdiagnosed or not? She is only 19 months now but I would like to stay on top of these issues to get her proper help early. Thanks!!!

Jul 05, 2014
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Sensory processing Issues.
by: Anonymous

Hi,

Many children that have low tone have auditory processing problems due to a muscle in a the ear that has a role in stimulating the cerebellum. An auditory processing problem is often if not always misdiagnosed by speech therapist. There are (from memory) 11 brief consonants that are not processed easily and the short vowels are also an issue. The letters r and l are also an issues. Often syllables are dropped and this has to due with short term memory problems that are part of auditory processing disorder. Therefore, when a child is young, the speech therapist can check for an auditory perception issues and address speech therapy to lessen the deficit by working on the weaknesses in auditory perception of sound of letters, words.

I recall one study of many I have reviewed on 94 children with learning disabilities only one child did NOT have CAPD. A speech therapist that does NOT understand CAPD is putting your child at risk for a language based learning disability. Language disorders can be fueled by auditory processing disorder. Language disorders extend into reading and writing disabilities and all learning is based in language. If a child is nonverbal then maybe an auditory brain stem response test and the risk factors for CAPD are many and can be found Online.

Premature babies often have brain bleeds and this is a risk for reading disorder and reading disorder arise form language disorder. A speech therapist test for auditory processing disorder is called the Test of Auditory Processing (TAPs) and you can ask your speech therapist for this test. This can help to be referred for an audiology CAPD test. OR the therapist can use speech therapy techniques for CAPD, sicne there is proof of the risk. ASHA has many resources about CAPD in speech and audiology. You can print out speech therapy responsibilities and roles and bring this to your school or to the clinic.

There is also a Fisher Kindergarten screening questionnaire that can be used and Jack Katz has other resources on his website.OR get an evaluation for Dr. Hooks and he can write a speech plan or an IEP support plan. There are other clinics in the USA that may have training in using a plan form Dr. Hooks or Dr. Kaiz, but you have to find the help yourself.

Children with allergies and ear tubes and a finding of sticky fluid have auditory processing disorder. Ear tubes do not work with sticky fluid.

What you can do is find a speech therapist that understand CAPD and will help a child before the audiolgy test for CAPD at age 5 can be done. The Buffalo Model hearing test should be used for CAPD with a follow-up Phonemic Synthesis Program. The problem is that not too many people are trained in what children with CAPD need. The school audiologist probably uses the Bellis-Ferre model and is is limited science for speech intervention You can google Jack Katz Phd and find many resources that will help you understand this as a treatable intervention..

If you put the information from the brain together. A problem with a sensory issues is associated with attention issues. Children with language disorders have attention and motor skills issues. Children with motor problems have issues with emotional regulation and reasoning. A young child with sensory issues is at risk for the above problems and if you get early help form highly trained professionals in speech and audiology then you may save your child from enormous problems later.

i hope this is helpful and it was written quickly, do your homework, get excellent care now. The best time for help is before age 5 due to the brain's ability to adapt and change.

Jul 01, 2014
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long road
by: Anonymous

We are there too. At two my daughter had words but could not put them into sentences, at three the same at four she could spell potty but could not ask for the potty in a sentence. After a year of speech, ot, and iep she has th speech ability of a 3 yo at 5. Please tell me stories of success.

Nov 04, 2012
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Just like me:)
by: HonorsMom

OMG Agnes, my Son is in the same boat. He goes to a LIU school because of his age, 3 1/2 Speech & OT at school as well at another facility. He just had adenoid surgery because of his reoccuring ear infections, the Dr'r think is causing most of those issues with his hearing. But reading your post, is making me rethink the issue about his hearing. Though, the recent test came back that his hearing was good, but the auditory delay may be his problem as well. He does have the expressive & receptive disorder, and the LIU wants to evaluate him for Autism. No mom wants to hear that, but i really don't believe that is his issue.

Thanks for your post, you are making me re-think some stuff!

Nov 03, 2012
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4 1/2 with SPD and language delay
by: Agnes

My son is 4 and 1/2 years old and has SPD and language delay. He reached his developmental milestones very early. At 7 months he was sitting and crawling and at 10 months he was already walking, running and walking up and down the stairs at 11 months! His speech, however, was developing extremely slow. At 3 years old he could barely put two words together. He knew a lot of words but he was not able to put them into a sentence. It looked like his mind went blank when he was trying to say something. He did not know which words to use. Currently he is in speech and OT therapy twice a week. OT is going great. He has already made great progress with his social skills, and overall with his SPD symptoms however his language improvement is very very slow. He only communicates to satisfy his own needs, and his expressive language is very primitive and basically he does not engage in any kind of conversation. All you can get from him is "yes" or "no", and one or two word answer to questions, and he does not really ask questions about anything. I just want to add that his academic skills are very good. I worry that he may be on the autistic spectrum with his language delay.

Oct 23, 2012
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babbling 3 yr old granddaughter
by: Ladylou

I have a 3 (Nov 7th 2012) year old granddaughter who has only spoken the word "bye" and "hi" and part of Hallelujai (sp) the "lou" & "ya" part. She will only say the words after much coaxing. Other wise she is in a world of her own language. She seems to know exactly what she says but it is not words. She walks on tip toes and does slump against furniture quite a bit. I have read she may have a SID issue but right now is in a special preschool 4 days a week and I am not sure this is the most aggressive place for her. I am so worried about her. She is still in diapers too.

Oct 06, 2012
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THIS HAS BEEN A GREAT HELP
by: Liz R

Our son does not have a diagnosis yet, but reading this made me cry because this is what he is like. School have said they think he has sensory issues and that he isn't coping in mainstream. he has a receptive language delay. he won't wear shorts and only certain type pyjamas, a fighter jet will go over he doesn't flinch, a hand dryer in the super market toilets sends him into meltdown!!when he is at meltdown point, and your angry with his behaviour he just needs to be cuddled, its the only thing that calms him. He loves cuddles, is very physical. Thank you so much for this article. This is somthing I will ask the paediatrician about.





Sep 04, 2012
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My daughter has the same
by: Jennifer

I have a daughter with the same as AJ, and she did like him where she was on time with her mile stone as well. I found that when she started school her language greatly improved. I was so worried before she started school about the samethings you are, but when she started school it was a huge improvement. plus they work with her 2 times a week... I hope that helps.....

Jul 24, 2012
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new website information for CAPD, autism, etc
by: Anonymous

I would like to mention a brilliant professional, Dr. Willard Hooks Jr. Phd. As far as I know, he is the only person in the Untied States with such impressive intelligence and expertise. With the added pleasantries of humor, integrity, kindness, compassion, genuineness, a humanity in care for all children. What I found with Dr. Hooks was sadly absent in all the other speech centers that I visited for years. Many speech centers do not understand CAPD or use LIPS speech therapy, Phonemic Synthesis Training, and Response to Intervention, etc. The lack of targeted intervention and misguided speech and audiology services is the reason my child's profound auditory processing deficit developed into multiple learning disabilities.

If,Dr. Hooks cared for my child in the preschool years, his life would be without multiple disabilities and academic/reading failure. Dr. Hooks has the following credentials: speech therapist, audiologist, Phd in neuro-science, licensed elementary teacher in Illinois, former communication disorder college professor, reading specialist,and usage of "Lev Vytosky" self talk during therapy sessions.

Dr. Hooks trains parents in each session to understand and use his methodology at home. Dr. Hooks has the A.S.H.A credentials to diagnose and treat Central Auditory Processing Disorder in speech and audiology services. He can help write an education plan, and when the school lacks the ability to teach; Dr. Hooks can teach the lessons needed and advise the parent how to teach the child.

I believe that it is my responsibility to help other parents discover what I have found for my child, hope for a normal life. Dr. Hooks can help non-verbal children speak, autistic children, downs, traumatic brain injury, etc and he specializes in Central Auditory Processing Disorder. He use LIPS speech therapy and phonemic synthesis training. (a secret weapon for speech therapists)

Dr. Hooks was trained by Dr. Jack Katz in the Phonemic Synthesis Program. Dr. Katz pioneered the phonemic synthesis methodology and Dr. Hooks has added his own expertise to this program. The program is done in 15 lessons and my child was able to process language normally after the completion of the program. We have to practice to keep his skills strong but it is easy to do. I hope this helps parents to give there child what should happen in all speech clinics, "Best Practices." The earlier you start, the better for your child. I hope you have the opportunity to contact Dr. Hooks and give your child the chance of a lifetime, one therapy session at a time, can do wonders for the entire family.

I have enclosed the website link and contact information. Even his website is welcoming: http://otoling.com/Welcome_To_OtoLing.html
OtoLing Auditory and Speech Services, 1020 E. Ogden Suite 212, Naperville, Il 60563-8609

Mar 01, 2012
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pre teen with SPD/ MRELD
by: Traci

Hi Im new here, and was really hoping someone here had a child (pre-teen) with SPD and mixed receptive expressive language delays (non pervasive). I would so love to talk and see what kinds of things you are doing for your pre-teen (hopefully a girl entering into puberty :)) struggling even more with focus issues. Tonight we were going over spelling words before test tomorrow and I literally had to ask her 6 time to spell "fascinated" for me. (this is a word she knows. I catch her jerking her head down like she is in deep deep thought, typical but a little to deep (if you know what I mean).... She goes to speech and OT to help with SPD and writing. She takes Buspar for Anxiety, I think she developed a tick from 2nd grade when her elementary school principal/teachers literally backed me in a corner to put her on meds. (long long story) :(. However, The Buspar helps but I need something else to help her focus. Thank you all for listening to my story and I will check back as I see ppl are still updating on this forum. I hope I get a response.. Thanks again Traci

Jan 13, 2012
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Thanks
by: Anonymous

My son has just been diagnosed with mixed receptive expressing language disorder, We have an appointment to see a OT to work with his sensory processing abilities. He just turned 3 and is really struggling in his preschool. I have always known there was something going on with him, but my family and his ped. always said that he was fine. Now he can't tell you what he wants short of saying one work phrases like drink or eat. He also hate to go to sleep. It takes us 2 hours to get him to actually go to sleep at night. I am so happy to find this board and to learn more about this. I have just ordered the books through amazon that you guys suggested.

Jan 04, 2012
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2 yr old - SPD / language delay?
by: Jenny T - Seattle area

Hello - I've had my son in weekly OT & ST since he was 18 months old after I thought he was behind in his speech for his age. EI determined OT would also be beneficial. I've been reading the boards on this site and I'm wondering about auditory processing issues and if his current ST is effective?

We are seeing OT help 'calm' his system and people have said they are seeing progress here. The OT treats him as a 'sensory kid', common with preemies I guess.

As for ST, he says words/phrases here and there, but I'm wondering if there is more we can be doing or looking at (he's now 26 mos).
I had just noticed for the first time he hummed when standing in line at a busy store and again when we got to his grandpa's house for Christmas. I hadn't heard or noticed this before. I assumed it was because his schedule was off and he hadn't napped that day, was over tired. The humming lasted a few minutes each time.

I heard humming again in the car driving with family, but only for a minute at best, again he was sleep deprived that day. Anyways, I'm unclear why this is starting now, what it means, how to treat it, if I need to bring this up with this ST, etc? When I mentioned it to his OT, she said that was just a calming thing. Thanks!

Sep 25, 2011
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advice: Dr. Hooks is a genius
by: Anonymous


If you live in Illinois, see Dr. Willard Hooks Jr Phd in Naperville Illinois at 1020 E. Ogden

Internet search under OtoLing

http://web.mac.com/otoling/OtoLing_Audiology_and_Speech_Services/Welcome_To_OtoLing.html

Sep 24, 2011
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speech delay
by: Anonymous

hi i am wondering if anyone can help me my son who is 6 year old got speech delay is speech is like 3 plus year old he on sen at school and now they said he need to be on sen action plus more one to one with him and more montering i nites he know number 19 but dont not know the number makes nineteen he can only do one task at a time he under speech and language therapy an sen at school he seems to just snap ever so offer but he does not no why i myself does work at home with him to help with all of his work and what they are doing in school but also they put my son on 12 week curse for maths at he not at his level for his age i just confuse as i dont know if anything wrong with him all is school expecting to much for him as my son his a very happy boy please can anyone advise me thanks

Sep 03, 2011
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Sign language is working for us
by: Camille(Texas)

My son has SPD and is Sensory Seeking. He is almost 2 1/2, and his language is very delayed(only has a handful of words that are barely intelligible). Because of how physically driven he is, our ST suggested signing to promote language development, and it is a God send! Although not a permanent fix, he is at least able to communicate basic needs to us. I believe that it takes a special kind of person to parent these kiddos, so my heart goes out to all of you mommies!

May 01, 2011
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son with language processing disorder and SPD
by: Jennifer

I can really relate to what is being said on this site. My 6 yr old son has both SPD and a language processing disorder. In January 2011, his school system is looking into possible mild Asperger's. I feel like they are trying to label him with something he does not have. I am not going to let them give him an autistic label just so he can get services. Currently, he is getting speech therapy. Because his fine motor skills have greatly improved, he does not qualify for speech therapy at school. Alot of his sensory issues affect him at home more than school. Does anyone else relate to my situation?

Sep 15, 2010
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27months...no talking at all
by: Anonymous

Hi Lanetta,
I recently tried to add you on Facebook 9/15/10...I'd like to talk to you more about SPD. My son is 27 months and doesnt talk at all.

Jul 12, 2010
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You are not alone please contact me
by: Lanetta Jones

My son is now three years old, and he is in occupational therapy. The therapist has informed me she to thinks my son has Sensory processing disorder. He is speech delayed as well. As parents I find it's important to talk with other parents and share information and things that are helping our child. Please if your child has this and is speech delayed, contact me so we can chat. You can find me on Facebook...my name is Lanetta Jones. Thank you : )

Mar 22, 2010
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ask questions do research
by: Anonymous

Does your child have low tone? this can cause auditory processing issues. If you do not live in Illinois the find a speech therapist who is also an audiologist to test your child. My son had testing by Dr.L Koziol a neurospchologist who explained that these problem come in pairs and triads. He also has a new book on Amazon which you can google. If a child has motor skill problem it is the same area of the brain which regulates emotional thinking and reasoning. So this is another neuro. pair deficit. My son also had sensory issues and motor issues which were addressed in speech therapy with Dr. Hooks in Illinois. An audiologist can use the Buffalo model to test children earlier than age seven for auditory perception problems. A speech therapist can use Phonemic Synthesis Training by Jack Katz to help a child decode sounds. You can google Dr. Jack Katz and Dr. Hooks. You can ask questions to be certain that a speech therapist is qualified to treat your son. I know because speech therapy was don wrong for four years on my son. A child's phonemic awareness is developed by age 7, so now is the time to get the right answers. Hope this is helpful.

Mar 20, 2010
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SPD, Speech Delay and Gastro Issues
by: Anonymous

I can't say how much this website has helped me cope. My little one has been receiving PT, OT and later speech since he was 9 months old and he is now 5. He didn't walk until he was 2. He also experienced unusual gasto issues where he threw up every time he had a BM - until he was 3! After numerous tests and missed diagnoses - we finally were told he had SPD. I read everything i could get my hands on about it and everything started falling into place.

He is making progress and will start regular K next year with an in-class aid. His speech delay however continues to be our biggest challenge. I am glad to see all of this information on linking the SPD with speech delay. I plan on talking to his pediatric neurologist in April about getting a pinpointed diagnosis that will hopefully help with his speech therapy. Thank you to everyone who has commented. It is so difficult not to know what the future holds for my little boy but it does help to know that we're not the only ones going through this.

I wish the medical community would catch up and there were more resources out there for SPD. I definitely recommend the The Out-of-Sync Child to anyone who is curious and wants to know more - it helped me so much.

Feb 13, 2010
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my son had all of these labels
by: Anonymous

Auditory Processing is the cause of my son's language disorder of mixed expressive receptive speech delay and no therapist figured it out. Even though I knew it, there was no help until Dr. Hooks intervened. The problem is that the speech therapists are not qualified for auditory processing therapy. Look up American Speech Hearing Association's guidelines for speech and audiology testing and intervention for CAPD.

If you do not get the right therapy for him now. This will turn into a reading and writing disability. This happened in my son's case. I did years of wrong speech and occupational therapy. You can look for qualified professionals in your state with LIPS and CAPD speech therapy and you need to find a qualified audiologist that follows ASHA guidelines.Less that 1% of the professionals in communication disorders have dual credentials in speech and audiology. Dr. Hooks has both credentials and is also a neuroscientist, elementary teacher, college professor, and he uses psychology in his practice to help self esteem and self control. He can write speech plans if you can find someone to follow his intervention in your state.

Your child may not have CAPD. If you don't rule it out you are wasting precious time and money on wrong therapy and this will be more costly later.

Look up Dr. Koziol and Dr. Hooks to understand these issues. Language is reading and writing is re-reading. This gets worse in school because our education system has no idea on how to help these children. Good Luck, if you need more information, let me know.

Feb 13, 2010
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resources for help
by: Anonymous


Board Certified Neuropsychologist in Neuropsychology and pediatric neuropsychology. He specializes in evaluating attention, learning and memory, and learning disabilities such as reading/spelling and math disorders. He also teaches at the graduate and postgraduate levels, and he supervises psychologists who are re-specializing in neuropsychology. He has been collaborating with Dr. Best for over 15 years. He is on the faculty at The Fielding Graduate Institute and at the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science.

We are near accommodations with reasonable rates for those traveling from out of town. Please call or email for assistance in making arrangements for lodging.

Most people realize that accurate diagnosis is important because correctly identifying the problem is the first step towards organizing a proper treatment plan and intervention. Dr. Koziol has seen patients from locations throughout the United States as well as from other countries.

His office is centrally located in the hub of the United States, so that travel and lodging arrangements can easily be made. On occasion, a family finds it more efficient to subsidize Dr. Koziol's travel, room, and board expenses. In these instances, Dr. Koziol will consider a "house call" type of arrangement if a setting can be determined where the individual can be seen. Dr. Koziol is well connected with professionals in most areas of the country, and therefore, office space can sometimes be arranged in other locations.
http://web.mac.com/otoling/OtoLing_Audiology_and_Speech_Services/Welcome.html
Dr. Willard Hooks Jr. Phd
Dr. Jack Katz traoned Dr. Hooks http://www.jackkatzphd.com/our-staff/

Feb 13, 2010
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hope for help
by: Anonymous

I have learned many things from Dr. Hooks. Does your son have low tone? If so this can effect a muscle in the ear which in turn effects the brain stem response to sound. Central Auditory Processing Disorder is more common with boys and it only takes 2 weeks of an untreated ear infection to cause a processing disorder. You need to find someone to test him now for processing issues. Dr. Hooks can help at this young age. Maybe your son is not eating due to low tone, or could he have allergies? Kids with Milk allergy refuse to eat. I think Children's Memorial was doing research on Milk allergies. Have they done a Brain Stem Response test? I think this is done after being tested for processing issues. Dr. Hooks can write speech plans for others to follow. I would not have an audiologist that is not trained in CAPD test your son. My son had loads of normal hearing tests due to ear fluid and conductive hearing loss. My son also had few words and behaviors. Dr. Hooks has solved everything. He can give the child the self control in his therapy and he trains me to do the same at home. The mild Autistic label may not be true, this is overly diagnosed. My son had similar quasi-autistic behaviors. Autistic children have CAPD. My son has a chance to be not disabled. He has improved enormously due to Dr. Willard Hooks Jr. Phd.

His office is in Naperville, Illinois. If you live in Illinois, I would not get speech or audiology testing anywhere but with Dr. Hooks. I have enclosed his website link.

Review his sight under frequently asked questions.
http://web.mac.com/otoling/OtoLing_Audiology_and_Speech_Services/Welcome.html

I have enclosed Dr. Jack Katz's website. He trained Dr. Hooks. They both do Phonemic Synthesis Training which is a secret weapon for speech therapists. In 15 lesson with synthesis training my son could process language. He had 4 years of speech therapy and no one realized he wasn't decoding sounds. You can look for a therapist that does this program in your state.

Here is Dr. Katz's website link:
http://www.jackkatzphd.com/our-staff/
Another resource for neuropscyholgical testing is Dr. Koziol. His recent book is on Amazon. This proves that children with motor deficits have difficulties with emotional regulation and reasoning. He also reports how neurological deficits come in pairs and triads. He charge $950 compared to three thousand for the other similar exam which wasn't done as well and mislabeled him with emotional disturbances. His emotional issues are directly related to his brain injury per Dr. Koziol's groundbreaking research. This should empower you to get therpay that is done right for him.

I have enclosed Dr. Koziol's link and you can type his name on Amazon for info. about his book. Knowledge is power, the brain can improve with right therapeutic early intervention. Good Luck to you.
http://www.hostzone.com/koziol/index.html

Feb 12, 2010
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SPD and Language Delay
by: Anonymous

I can really feel the pain in your situation,I have a hard time finding information on both conditions. It is crazy it seems that boys seem much more likely to get these problems. My son is 2 1/2 years old when he was about 8 months old we started having all kinds of problems with him. It wasn't until he was almost two that we were able to get help. They told me he had sensory processing disorder. He did not talk at all. His first word did not come until he was almost 26-27 months and that was after 3 months of speech therapy. He learned to sign and that helped but he still has a limited vocabulary and can not even put two words together now. He is improving and then he was diagnosed with Developmental Language Disorder which I was told by his neurologist is a very mild, mild form of autism. It has been hard trying to figure out what he needs and wants. There is lots of screaming and fit throwing even when he is by himself playing. He is easily frustrated and we are taking it a day at the time. Sometimes he won't even let my family touch him. (he is tactile defensive)OT and speech have helped.

To make matters worse my son has gastro problems and does not eat, this I am sure does not help him improve. We are working on that right now, some days he refuses to eat anything. The doctors are trying to help him and right now he drinks most of his nutrition. I know it is hard but it will get better, and therapy makes all the difference in his life. I wish I could be of more help but I only know to take it as it comes.

Sep 25, 2009
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My son has normal processing ability now
by: Anonymous

Thanks for your help. This is the problem of inept therapist and audiologists. I had my son tested by Dr. Leonard Koziol. He explained that my son's neurological problems come in pairs and triads. From memory kids with sensory issues will also have attention deficit. Sensory/motor difficulties are also a pair. Language disorder is a pair with a reading disorder since reading is language. I have learned that writing is re-reading, so now my son has a writing disability too. You can google Dr. Leonard Koziol. His website is informative and his book review on Amazon is available.

Low tone can effect the brain stem according to Dr. Hooks. So it is important to get the correct intervention now.Kids with low tone have SPD. My son has multiple learning disabilities because therapy was done wrong. Auditory perception problems can be diagnosed early in the Audiology Buffalo Model is used. The testing is complex and most audiologist aren't trained in it.

My friends child was tested by Dr Hooks before age 5, and a neuropsych. and speech therapist confirmed his CAPD diagnosis through additional testing. Mixed Expressive/Receptive Delay is from CAPD because if language can't get in it can't get out.

My son was in an orphanage and suffered from not hearing properly due to untreated ear infection for three and a half years. This continued here till age 6. He had profound CAPD and a 2 year delay. The delay is still two years but thanks to Dr. Hooks he is able to learn at school now.

Look up the steam roller technique that Occupational Therapists use for deep pressure to calm your child. However, the sensory issues are gone for my son. The OT ideas didn't work for sensory and writing. Dr Hooks uses self and parallel talk, no more sensory issues besides a little tactile defensiveness. He also helped with writing and math. He is brilliant. Dr. Hooks never says no, don't and there is no time out. He trains me in each session. Try to find a SPL/OT/audiologist that are certified by ASHA to diagnose and treat CAPD in your area. I hope this helps you. I am angry because this should not be happening to any child. You need therapy that works. I have spent a fortune on wrong therapy. If you need more info please email me.

Sep 25, 2009
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CAPD reversed in 15 therapy sessions
by: Anonymous

If anyone wants to join me in a letter writing campaign to the National Institutes of Health to complain about the lack of training of speech therapists and audiologists in the diagnosis and treatment of processing issues. Please email me if you are interested in writing a letter to help children in need. Nine percent of all school aged children have this deficit and the lack of appropriate intervention is disabling our children. This is costing families and the government millions because the school programs do not intervene properly. My son has a chance to live as a non-disabled adult, thanks to Dr. Willard Hooks. I'd like to see other children have the same chance. Please email me if you are interested in writing a letter to help children in need.

Sep 25, 2009
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SPD Little Speech
by: Rebecca

My son sounds so much like yours. He is almost 3.5 and only says a few words. He also has SPD and is a sensory seeker. If you need someone to talk to you can email at rwoodring@stny.rr.com

Mar 08, 2009
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Help with SPeech/CAPD/Schools
by: Anonymous

I will include a brilliant doctor's website. My son had speech therapy done wrong in private and public settings for four years. He was adopted from an orphanage at age 3 1/2. He has profound CAPD, and significant mixed expressive receptive language disorder, reading disorder, writing disorder, and other issues. We tutored him at Lindamood Bell but could not get support from the Chgo. Public School District.

He was placed in a general education class, bullied and harassed by his classmates, and unable to process language at school. Dr Willard Hooks improved his processing ability in fifteen lessons. He also helped build his self esteem during the sessions. He teaches parents how to help with simple speech lessons that are fun for the child. He is a teacher, speech therapist, audiologist, and a neuro-scientist.

I have also contacted the Dept. Of Justice to file a discrimination complaint. I tried to fight CPS with a lawyer, and I have twenty thousand dollars of legal debt. I have been without a school placement since 3/08. If many parents complain to the Office of Civil Rights. They will investigate the District. Chicago does not have a primary language/reading program, yet CPS believes they can meet his needs.

I hope this helps everyone. Dr. Hooks can help non-verbal children speak, and can write speech plans/IEP plans. Good Luck, Let's ban together and fight! I contacted Senator Dick Durbin. He has forwarded my complaint to Senator James DeLeo. Any question, please email me at mah763@comcast.net. (written quickly)
Dr Hooks: 1020 E. Ogden, Naperville Illinois
http://web.mac.com/otoling/OtoLing_Audiology_and_Speech_Services/Welcome.html

Dec 10, 2008
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crawl
by: Michele

I understand how frustrating it is not to understand what your child is saying. When my son was 3 he hardly spoke and what he did say I had to translate. A friend suggested I do what they used to call "taking them back to the mat". This meant that I should crawl with him. So, my older son and I crawled all day, every day and for whatever reason, it worked. Three days of crawling and he started talking. Now, its amazing if he's quiet for more than 5 minutes. We have other SPD issues, but he's become a real chatterbox(at home). Oh yeah, he's almost 11. Hope this helps.

Dec 09, 2008
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Please help my son
by: Ericka

My son is 12 years old and I just recently learned that he has receptive difficulty. For years I have been told by educators that he was just lazy. We live in Chicago and I don't know what the next step is or how I should proceed.

I have always known that there was another problem because his attention span is just too short and his level of comprehension is just very low. My son was tested outside of Chicago Public School. I have advised the school of the finds but they are not ready to proceed any further because they want a full report. How do I proceed to get help for my son. Where can I take him?

I'm willing to transfer him to another school but I need to make sure that the new school will be able to assist and address his problem. I firmly believe that the current school can not help him because they have already concluded that his problem is laziness and lack of acceptance of responsibility.

Please help if you can. e.garmon@pecorp.com

Thanks

Aug 26, 2008
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Language Disorder
by: Laura

My son was diagnosed with Mixed Receptive/Expressive Language Disorder earlier this year. Prior to that I knew something was wrong. He had such trouble with following direction and my Dr. would tell me he's a boy, that's normal. I finally had him evaluated in June 2007 and Chicago Public Schools labeled him developmentally delayed. Earlier this year I went to a Dr. for a diagnoses and that's when we heard about the Mixed Receptive/Expressive Language Disorder. He receives speech once a week in school. He will be receive speech once a week outside of school as well. Our insurance won't pay for it, but we'll do it anyway.

My greatest concern will be his interaction with kids his age at school. He'll be starting K next week. I know kids tend to get frustrated with him because he can't follow directions to games.

I was so happy to find this page, most forums I find are very outdated, there doesn't seem to be a lot of information on this disorder on the internet.

Jul 28, 2008
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SPD and Language Disorder
by: Mary

My son was diagnosed with a severe specific language disorder when he was still three. Aged 9 he was assessed as having the language age skills of a kindergartner and not surprisingly his social and academic skills were in the same ball park.

After years of failure from education and medical professionals we his parents figured from research that sensory processing might be the underlying cause of his problems and that his severe language difficulty (receptive expressive comprehension etc) was likely a symptom. He was subsequently diagnosed with auditory processing disorder and this transpired to be his biggest sensory deficit with abnormality across all areas of auditory function. Imagine that being undiagnosed and unremediated for so many years and having to survive in a mainstream school environment!


It is fundamentally clear to us now that we were correct because he has made excellent progress. If you correctly assess and implement suitable remediation for sensory processing difficulties very early then the gains are going to be greater because neural development at the right developmental time is important for successful language development. With our son the failure to diagnose and treat severe auditory dysfunction from an early age may mean that because vital physiological milestones were not met within the right period (eg auditory maturation is neurally driven by age)and so as a result some windows for
language development may be closed but so far he continues to make gains from various therapies which for the moment seems to suggest that he has language delay and not disorder because his language ability is responding and improving with remediation.

Language development is dependent on all our sensory processes working together, deal with the sensory deficits and you are likely to create the opportunity for language development.

Jun 24, 2008
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Also OT and speech therapy
by: Anonymous

My son has OT and speech therapy 2 times a week! So I know what your going through! When I came on here I didn't see anyone that had language delays either but my son does too.

Feb 28, 2008
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Thank goodness
by: sally r-v

Thank goodness I have found this web site. Our four year old girl has run the mill of testing over the previous 14 months. Between being told she has dyspraxia, language disorder, and affected processing issues believed to be caused by a spot in the brain (2 mm in size) that didn't receive blood in utetro.

This is something we can handle I'm sure but I struggle with what seems inconsistent information about what and how much help she needs. I don't like to refer to it as abnormal or bad because she wouldn't be our Lilly if she was any other way. She is a happy, contented child with a beautiful disposition.

Generally I don't like to discuss the worry or how fear for my child hurts beyond belief because this isn't about me but our little Lil. But I'm sick of feeling foolish for reacting to a piece of news such as 'we are deeply concerned and hope she should be able to do her own shopping', to find a week later they are surprised that this was upsetting for a day, and then find it being down played because it made the mum feel a bit sad.

Has anyone else experienced this and is it too much to ask for a straight diagnoses even if it makes the parent sad. We will get over it and we need to know so we can help our kids!

Oct 24, 2007
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Update
by: Anonymous

I never wrote you after you responded to my comments about AJ on the link in your website used to ask questions (forget what it's called!). I wanted to tell you how grateful I am for your response. He's been in therapy for two and a half weeks now, and I've seen some changes. In some ways he seems worse, but I saw a response you wrote to another person's question where you said sometimes they seem a little worse for a bit.

Something that he really responds to with the therapists (and I've witnessed) is the picture schedule. It's really amazing! He has an EXTREMELY difficult time with transitions, and the picture schedule really helps him. The therapist is making a morning set and an evening set for us based off of a list I made for her of the order of events we follow during those times. We are going on a 5 day vacation this weekend, so I'm hoping they will help.

Another thing we have begun is the brushing. I notice an immediate change after we do this! Even when he still becomes stubborn and resistant, there are not the screaming, hitting, out-of-control, fits there used to be. I bought three of the books you suggested on your website, and have started reading The Out-of-Sync Child first.

Thank you SO much for your website and your answers to all of our questions. You're right, it is much better knowing that my son is not the only one. I used to get so frustrated. When we go out together, I always get stares, scowls, and often, unwanted advice. I look much younger than I am, so I think people assume I'm just not a good mother. I even get a little bit of a bad vibe from the director at his preschool, but his teacher seems to like both of us, so it's working out. So my morale is improving!!

Thanks again,
Jessi


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