Tics and propriceptive disorders?

by Diedre
(South Africa)

My son 7 has been making soft noises for some time, they become louder at times and sometimes he does not even make them, although at the moment they are rather persistent. No one at school has noticed them and so it is not affecting him socially. We have had him tested for PANDAS, and are hoping it is not tourettes, we are also exploring emotional options, he is an anxious child in general, he is currently at OT for low muscle tone and the therapist mentioned proprioceptive dysfunction, so I thought it would be great to hear if these noises could be related to this...


They can be heard more in his home environment, when watching TV, on the computer, but he will also make them when running with us, doing reading homework etc, however his teacher has not noticed them when reading in the class? The OT had never heard them before until this week when she focused specifically on sensory related tasks, he says sometimes he makes them as they make him feel good but most of the time he does not know he is making them! Any feedback would be appreciated - Thanks!

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Mar 09, 2013
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Tics
by: Anonymous

Strep can also cause tics - or any other kind of infection. When my son was 7 he tested neg for strep for 4 months while tics, headaches and other symptoms got worse. After that no matter what antibiotic we used he was positive for strep. Once the tonsils came out he has been tic free flr 2 yrs.

My other son with propriceptive motor issues has had some mild motor tics after a sinus infection- more of a transient tic issue. I see it from time to time. Tics can run in families.

For my son who had the strep related severe motor tics- we sought help from a cognitive behavioral therapist that worked with him to replace his urge to tic with a something he could hide ( ie: squeeze toes). This does not be become a new tic but creates. New neural pathway to train the body to refrain from ticking. It worked- I was shocked.

Nov 09, 2010
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Response to Tics
by: Marti

Dear ugates:

My daughter also has a regulatory disorder (sensory modulation disorder) and she just recently started having tics. My recommendation is to go to a website called nowleap.com. They test for food and chemical sensitivities which can play a big role in epilepsy and/or tics. They will send you a kit and you go to your doctor and have blood drawn from your child. They will send you or your doctor a report that delineates what your child is highly, moderately, or not reactive to. You then eliminate the things that your daughter is highly or moderately reactive to in her diet and you may see a great improvement in your daughter's tics.

Apr 18, 2010
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Transient tic disorder
by: ugates

My daughters tics started off as rapid eye blinking and neck twisting. It would come and go with intensity, but each time with a new tic. She does have a lot of anxiety and that does play a role with her tics. She also has verbal tics and other motor tics (shoulder shrugs, leg and arm twitches, stomach twitches, etc). Her newest tic is she shakes her head back and forth rapidly and snorts. Her previous verbal tic was a grunt. Hers started about two years ago.

I am thinking hers is tourettes, but her neurologist thinks transient tic disorder. She is on clonidine which is the main treatment for tourettes. We are currently still investigating this, but sometimes feel I am just spinning my wheels with the neuro. Her neuro did rule out seizures.

She does have an O.T. and she said my daughter has sensory modulation and processing disorder.

She is going to see a therapist starting this week and see what she says. Sometimes I feel we are being thrown from one doctor to the next. It can get frustrating.

We try not to bring attention to her tics and take one day at a time.

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