2 1/2 year-old with SPD???

by Amy
(San Diego)

I am very concerned about my best friends 2 1/2 year-old son. After researching some of his behaviors online I am becoming convinced he might have SPD. I have tried to talk to her and although she acknowledges he has some "odd" behaviors, she thinks he will outgrow them and is really only worried about his speech delay.


I know how important early intervention is so if I am right I just want to see him get the help he needs as soon as possible. I guess I am interested in hearing if someone thinks I am on the right track. This will help me know if I should just drop it or to continue gently pushing her to get more help for her son. I love them both dearly and just don't want my pushing to cost me our friendship.

Some of his behaviors that concern me:
- Late crawling, walking
- delay in speech (currently getting speech therapy)
- very clumsy
- smells all food (and other items) prior to eating
- picky eater
- shoves food in his mouth until it is overly full
- arm flapping
- rocking, especially while on the couch watching TV
- walks and runs on his tip toes
- runs stiffly, awkwardly
- excessive throwing objects and pushing things over (has broken their TV, lamps, CD player and more)
- likes to eat food with strong flavors i.e. raw onion, garlic and also likes to eat lotion and liquid hand sanitizer soap (which I know is very dangerous)
- loves to swing (for long periods)
- loves to be rubbed
- prefers to be naked and is picky about his clothes (becomes very attached to specific t-shirts)

I also should add that he responds to his name and can follow simple instructions, which is why I don't think it's been an obvious diagnosis. I also think my friend is in denial and not sharing her concerns about the above mentioned behaviors with her pediatrician. I am not in her shoes and don't know what I would do if I were in her shoes. I spend so much time with her and her son and it just breaks my heart because I feel like there is help out there for him but then I try and remember that maybe it's just none of my business. Interested in others thoughts...

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Jun 01, 2009
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Definitely say something
by: Anonymous

My 9 year old nephew is autistic and has had many of the same symptoms your friend's son has. Even though it may be hard, say something to her about it. Even if she gets upset, it will at least plant the seed in her head that she should be getting help for her son. My sister waited to get help for her son and he should have had intervention sooner.

Mar 31, 2009
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Back Off Some
by: Anonymous

Hi, I'm going to disagree with the other comments. It's so obvious you love your friend but I think she may feel you are crossing a line. When our children have issues it's painful for us... PAINFULL. It's hard to want to open yourself up to the possibility that you precious baby might have to face a life long struggle. She might make it your problem because you point out all of his flaws.

I guarantee some of his behavior is "Just like Dad was" or "Just what grandma used to do", when kids are that little it's easy to dismiss things. She might feel she can't have you to confide in because you want to "Go There" and she's just not ready or maybe your just wrong. This little guy sounds like a riot and you friend will have many interesting stories to tell! Enjoy him and let HER fix him.

Mar 30, 2009
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Keep pushing
by: Anonymous

I definitely think you should keep trying to get her to have her son evaluated. It sounds like SPD to me. If she values your friendship she won't let it end just because you are trying to help. Good luck!

Mar 30, 2009
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encourage her
by: Anonymous

Please convince your friend to get her son to an early intervention program for an evaluation. If you catch this early the child can be helped. The longer she waits it is harder to help them. After age seven it is harder to help these children please encourage her by appealing to doing the best for him, and if she had him evaluated they could say nothings wrong, maybe telling her to better be safe than sorry motto will appeal to her.

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