Chiropractor

by Claudette
(BC, Canada)

Is going to a chiropractor helpful?

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Sep 05, 2012
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Apraxia
by: Anonymous

Thanks for your comments re your daug with Apraxia & chiropractor. We too ended up starting our 6 yr old son in about Nov 2011 at the chiro, although he doesn't seem to have had the instant impact i believe he has got better with his speech & others have also commented on this. Given how hard it is to do all the other therapies, the chiro at least is some relaxation for them!

Sep 04, 2012
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Sensitivity reduction with 5-HTP and valerian
by: Marisa

A few months ago I added the seratonin precursor 5-HTP to my diet in a formulation that includes some B vitamins and some valerian (widely used in Europe to aid in a calm mood).
After a few days at 100mg, I increased to 200mg, experiencing only the mildest nausea at the onset. (Contrast this with horrible, unremitting nausea and digestive problems on all SSRI-type drugs, including Cymbalta.)
Since then, I have felt calmer, with more energy and better focus. I was able to make some serious decisions and still to my guns with my family, despite terrible pressure from them. I feel more like myself -- and tougher! -- than I have ever been in my whole hypersensitive life. Also, I was able to stop all sleep medications. This regimen costs about $20 a month (K-Mart, County Market brands of 5-HTP). One side effect is that I lost about 10 pounds, but compare that with gaining 40 pounds on Cymbalta!
I tried this supplement on several friends who suffer depression, and all had benefits.
I hope that this success after 40 years of searching for help will benefit others as well.

My psychiatrist laughed at me for trying this "untested" supplement. Then he fired me! Lucky for me, I don't need a prescription for any of these nutrients.

Sep 04, 2012
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Apraxia
by: Anonymous

My daughter has speech and limb apraxia. She is 3.5 years old. She is very bright and would get so frustrated when we couldn't understand her. She has been getting speech 4-5 times per week, PT 3-4 times, and OT once a week (now increased to twice). Over the summer, she had several breaks from therapy. And we started taking her to a chiropractor about 6-7 weeks ago. We thought we would give it a try and found a very kind high quality person. The results have been amazing!!! The speech therapists have both asked us what did you do??? We will continue with all the therapy and the chiropractor once a week. There is no question that it as helped tremendously. It was as if some blockage got released and now she is on her way. We are very happy as you might imagine.

Apr 13, 2012
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did not work for us
by: Anonymous

My Son has seen a chiropractor a few times, and it has neither helped nor hurt his sensory seeking, hyperactive, impulsive behavior.

Jul 10, 2011
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Chiropractor and apraxia
by: Anonymous

Are there any recent updates or evidence of chiropractor assisting in children with apraxia of speech from birth. I have a 6 year old son with apraxia.

May 20, 2009
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Success with Chiropractor and Sensory issues
by: Anonymous

In my son's specific case, his gross motor skills improved within two weeks. It does increase stim to CNS so beware of increased sensitivity and reactions, but well worth the short term craziness

May 09, 2009
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I have most hope in a chiropractor
by: Anonymous

I will soon find out if it is possible for a chiropractor to help a 4 year old with apraxia and sensory issues. I am most positive he can help through acupressure (not using needles). I was in a car wreck about 8 years ago and this same doc literally fixed my back (I originally thought it was broken). I am willing to bet $$ he can help improve my 4 year old in just 1 session and I can't wait to find out. If it is possible i know he can do it. I will keep you posted on the outcome.

May 08, 2009
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Chiropractic Care
by: Daniel T Daly

There are a lot of interesting comments here! I am a family chiropractor with pediatric chiropractic certification (CACCP) from the International Chiropractic Pediatric Association (ICPA).

Many of the comments posted talk of acupuncture...which is an entirely different profession from the chiropractic profession...so I can not speak to its usefulness or efficacy in the realm of SPD.

The goal of a chiropractor is to remove the stress on the nervous system thereby allowing the body and brain to communicate more optimally.

I always find it amusing when another health care professional (PT, OT, DC) tells the public that a discipline in which they are not trained is worthless and only good for certain things.
Chiropractors generally care about the welfare of the child as opposed to the ego of the doctor or therapist. We encourage children with SPD, and other issues, to use PT and OT, as there is not ONE answer. The goal is to help these little ones as best we can...even if that means a treatment that has seen clinical benefit without the double blind studies.

Chiropractic care is not aimed at replacing other therapies, but we are the only ones who are trained to take pressure off of the nervous system. Many people find chiropractic care as a last resort after trying so many other things for themselves or their children, and they end up asking "Why didn't anyone tell me about this before?"

There are many types of chiropractors. Some have no idea how to work with a child. Some do adjustments with twisting and popping while others, like myself, do not.

A list of chiropractors with certification in pediatrics can be obtained at the ICPA website ICPA4kids.com. I encourage you to contact your local pediatric/family chiropractor to ask questions about what they do and their experience with pediatrics as well as whatever condition for which you are seeking help.

Another great web resource is upcspine.com. This website is devoted to Upper Cervical Chiropractic. The Upper Cervical techniques are tremendously effective which is why I have chosen to use Upper Cervical. There is much information here about what chiropractic is, and what it can help. There is also a directory of Upper Cervical Chiropractors there.

Please ask questions to whomever you choose to contact. This will allow you to get a better feel for how they may be willing, or able, to help.


Feb 03, 2009
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Try chiro again
by: Anonymous

As in all professions all chiropractors are not the same and all have different styles of practice and adjusting. I always tell people to find a friend who sees a chiropractor and then go see their doctor. Just like not all doctors are alike not all patients are alike either.

Make sure you voice your concern as to how you respond to your doctor's treatment. It is part of the doctor's job to re-evaluate their treatment depending on how a patient responds. Normal soreness is common in chiropractic treatment similar to the soreness felt if you went out and ran a mile today with out working up to it.

I apologize to you for any doctor that made you feel uncomfortable (being on a table naked with needles sticking out). As a wife and office manager for a chiropractor our mission is that all our patients feel comfortable in every aspect of office. I hope you find the help you are looking for and a doctor that can help you.

Dec 31, 2008
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SPD not aided by chiropractic or acupuncture
by: Marisa

I believe in both chiropractic and acupuncture, having spent plenty of money on both, but both were very hard for me to bear. I would almost pass out from chiropractic, and the acupuncture needles hurt a lot and didn't stop even when removed. I was told I have a stagnant liver. It is so hard to be naked and uncovered with the needles in, also. I loathe having skin "sticking out".

I can't say I ever noticed progress. I was trying to treat depression and "feeling overwhelmed".

Incidentally, psychotherapy and talk therapy were equally ineffective for me.

Dec 20, 2008
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Please consider this...Part 2
by: Marielle

Chiropractors educate and advocate about proper ergonomics, eating well, providing your body with the appropriate supplementation, and the importance of high intakes of water to ensure a reduction in the inflammatory processes. They work with their client over an extended period of time. A quality practitioner would NEVER induce pain onto your child. I am sorry to hear that someone had a negative experience when they had a manipulation. This is NOT how it should be done with anyone, especially with the children. In pediatric chiropractics, it is my understanding that a chiropractor will work on alignment of the spine WITHOUT manipulating, but using other techniques and teaching components.

As a doctoral candidate dedicating research and dissertation hours to the study of SPD and as a mental health therapist that works with the pediatric and family system, I have come across research discussing the efficacies of alternatives and additives to just the OT world. The hugest problem is that many folks just do not have clinical background and understanding of the specialized needs related to SPD. I encourage the development of your family care plan and review your key players. Research your geographical area to see if there are qualified pediatric chiropractors and those that have a background with SPD. It may sound like finding a needle in a haystack, but there are a number of folks that have the specialty credentials. Just as the addition of ANY new interventions/providers of care, it does require time, energy, and effort to seek persons that have more than just a general understanding about this special disorder! I would NOT rule-out the proper neurological, spinal, and joint care as well as the important information that could be gleaned from this discipline.

I wish you the very best and a happy holiday season!

Dec 20, 2008
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Please consider these points..Part 1
by: Marielle

I do not want to offend anyone, but I think the first two posts may be somewhat misleading and misguided. I am a Licensed Mental Health Counselor in the state of Florida and a mother to a beautiful 7 year-old daughter that does have sensory processing issues. I believe wholeheartedly that the progress she has made thus far in her young life is to be accredited to early intervention and a team that included persons from a multi-disciplinary approach. This team has included occupational therapists, physical therapists, speech-language pathologists, nutritionists, neurologists, and additional complimentary and alternative interventions that have also included consults with a dedicated and knowledgeable chiropractor, mental health/play therapies, and in the near future, listening therapy that will be under the guidance of the aforementioned chiropractor!

First and foremost, chiropractic medicine is NOT to be confused with allopathic traditions wherein the treatment of SYMPTOMS is the paramount goal(s). The medical model is what commands a large percentage of health care delivery in the U.S. and this is philosophy that seeks the "quick and easy" fix! Chiropractors are quite the opposite (or at least should be). The perception that they might be treating SYMPTOMS may stem from the fact that many do see and treat persons in acute pain from say, an auto accident; however, they additionally assist a person (including children, if they are specialized) towards long-term spinal and joint health. Their specialized training does include neurological bases of conditions and there is certainly evidence that SPD is neurologically based!! They also have massive exposure to how autoimmunity has a relationship with inflammation and how best to manage the LONG-TERM issues towards overall physical wellness.

Dec 17, 2008
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Chiropractor
by: Anonymous

As a Physical Therapist I have to say absolutely NOT! Chiropractors have one place in the world... giving people a quick and temporary fix to a problem and more than likely, making the problem worse.

The proper place to look for help for sensory issues is typically an Occupational Therapist. Sometimes you can find a Physical Therapist who is knowledgeable in sensory integrative therapy, but your best bet is to find an OT who has the proper training.

Dec 17, 2008
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Not Really
by: Anonymous

I wondered the same thing. My chiro recommended acupuncture, which is GREAT for those of us with tactile defensiveness :-) I did try it once, and after the chiro peeled my fingernails out of the exam bed... I thought okay, maybe this isn't for me. (Understatement of the year.)

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