Doesn't want to go to school

by Pablo Oyanguren
(Bogota Colombia)

My son has SPD and is in first grade. He has been to OT for the last 4 years, and up to now it has been fine, showing great progress and up to a couple of weeks ago, he used to go to school very happy. Now he just does not want to go, and we cannot get him to tell us why...


We are very confused about this situation, and would like to know or understand what we can do, to get him to go back to the way it was....

Help!

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Sep 07, 2009
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Update on not wanting to go to school.
by: Pablo Oyanguren

All of your comments sound familiar with what we ended up doing. We spoke to his teachers, and principal, along with the school Psychologist. They of course knew very little about SPD, and have been very supportive, when ever my son needed a hug, or re-enforcement he went to his teacher, who now understood, he wasn't being disruptive, but that he actually needed support...he has been able to go to school, and happy, which is the most important. We have also continued with the OT, and massages every night! When will it end.....? Thank you for all your comments.

Sep 07, 2009
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Doesn't want to go to school
by: Anonymous

When my son started first grade I had all the hopes in the world for him, but to my surprise he hated it. He would tell me he was not going to the hated school, he said the smells in the lunch room made him sick, he was constantly complaining about his toes hurting him and he didn't like having to go to the bathroom all the time to check on them (OCD).

I was literally in tears by the time I would drop him off at school because he begged me not to make him go and by the time he walked into his class he was in tears. I felt so guilty. When I would pick him up from school he would just break down and cry immediately taking it out on everyone around him. When he would ride the bus he complained it was just too loud and crazy. He hated his desk chair because it squeaked and he couldn't concentrate in class. When I told him to ask for a new one he said he was too shy.

After talking to a psychologist and his teacher, alot of my questions were answered. I know my son felt alot better. His teacher was awesome and totally worked with him. She was understanding and that made him feel alot more comfortable. I think communication made a huge difference. My son is very popular and tries hard to control himself at school, because he doesn't want to be embarrassed. His SPD wears him out and when he walks in the house after school, he just breaks down.

Feb 16, 2009
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talk to the school
by: Ericka

Hi, I am in the unique position of being a special education teacher in the same school where my son is in second grade. I would say, talk to your child's teacher. Does the teacher have a good understanding of SPD? (Most don't).

I go between total frustration to hope with our school. I have hope because I am a teacher there, and I get sensory processing disorder-so as a teacher I try my best to educate my colleagues. But many teachers there just don't understand. They're not trying to be mean or insensitive-they just don't understand the problems our kids face.

My son's teacher insists that if he can do a task one day, that means he can do it the next day. I am constantly trying to explain to her that he might have been in a good place sensory wise on the day he could do it, while the next day the light might be bothering him, his clothes might be uncomfortable, or anything.... This is one of the most difficult things to explain to teachers. SPD is different everyday, and the child cannot help it.

Does your child have someone he can trust? My son will always tell me what is bothering him-but unfortunately, no one else. It can be really tough with school anxiety-for me, I usually have to push my son to go to school, because I have to go to work. But I also try my best to help him find ways to get through the day.

Is he allowed to have sensory tools at school?

Feb 09, 2009
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sounds familiar
by: Anonymous

One of my friends had that problem this year with their 1st grader. The VP discussed some helpful tips to make it easier for their DS. He's better about going to school now. Definitely talk to someone from the school to see how they can help.
Good luck

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