Explaining your child's sensitivites

by Tracey
(GA)

How do you explain your child's sensitivities in such a way and in such words as to make people understand what you are talking about and that it's not just a phase, a behavioral problem, etc.? I even had trouble explaining his symptoms to his pediatrician. (9 months old)

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Jun 17, 2011
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How I Explain My Son's SPD to Others
by: Beth

I just tell the people who need to know (teachers, babysitters, etc) that my son has a neurological disorder called Sensory Processing Disorder, along with an anxiety disorder. I further explain that SPD is on the Autism spectrum. (Most people have heard of Autism and can relate to it.) I explain that his brain is wired differently than most people's. ALL of his senses are magnified in such a way that noises are louder (to the point of being painful), bumps and bruises feel harder, smells smell stronger, tastes taste stronger, etc. So, all of his reactions are stronger than they would be for someone who does not have SPD. Once people know that, they treat him with caring and respect, and help him to implement the coping stratagies we have in place.

Feb 20, 2011
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Oversensitiviy (or Overstimulation)
by: Anonymous

I am in my forties and always felt over-stimulated at times throughout my life. I never heard of the condition as being SPD. However, many years ago I read a book called "The Highly Sensitive Person" (or HSP). The explanations for being over-sensitive in many ways was exactly the way I felt and I finally felt "understood" completely! I tell family and friends in a joking way that I'm just "oversensitive and overstimulated" and they seem to "get it." (If hey don't, then they won't be a part of my close circle.) Learning to recognize being in a overstimulated environment and knowing I will need quiet time to "decompress" has been a life saver to me.

Oct 21, 2010
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Just an idea
by: Elise

We all have our five senses sight, smell, sound, taste and touch. Our senses work just like yours, except when the information gets to our brains, our brain isn't sure what to do with it or it does funny things with the information. So for example, we are told to look at the letters on the blackboard, our eyes know to go to the blackboard, but our brain goes 'look at all the cool stuff on the wall.' So we see, but can't distinguish. Or, we wrap a soft cashmere scarf around our neck, and our brain goes 'get those itty bitty pricky things off of me' Or, we have to walk in a line in a crowded hallway. Even though the teacher says 'stay in line', our brain goes 'get away, get away, there's too much shouting' So, we are a little different in how we take in the world.

Oct 13, 2010
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book idea
by: Anonymous

This site offers some great resources for us parents to better equip ourselves for those constant explanations we find ourselves offering. Check out the "SPD Store" for some good books that give simple explanations and tangible examples of some of the struggles we see on a daily basis. Building awareness is tiring, but keep at it!


Oct 13, 2010
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understand
by: Anonymous

Tell people about the difficulty of the neurological system of these children to integrate with the senses and so on. Asking to be available to understanding, and things that do not know just because you do not live. But they exist and are dolorose.regards

Oct 13, 2010
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Same boat
by: Anonymous

I am in the same boat, I really don't know how to explain it all. When I try I sound like I am idiot. It would be nice to be able to explain it in a way adults will understand it.

Oct 12, 2010
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it's tough
by: Anonymous

i couldn't really find the words to explain it at first either...i think as adults we want a clear cut word that says what it is and what it feels like but honestly i have spd and never knew it and my 5 year old daughter put it best a year ago, clothes and her hair being brushed 'just doesn't feel right' it doesn't quite hurt but it's not comfortable, it's almost like in between a severe tickle and hurting, almost like sandpaper. for me it's like i'm suffocating when i'm wearing tight clothes or a bra or something that just doesn't fit just right. i almost feel claustrophobic. light touch is just weird i have to rub it hard after to make it stop feeling the way it does ... almost painful... and even though it's just in one spot we can feel it throughout our whole body.

i hope this helped!!!!

Oct 12, 2010
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EXPLAIN
by: T'S MOM

I WOULD ALSO LIKE TO KNOW HOW...I'M REALLY HAVING A PROBLEM WITH TEACHER AND THE SCHOOL SYSTEM. PLEAS HELP

Oct 12, 2010
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Great question
by: Anonymous

I would also love to hear how people explain their child's sensory issues. Thanks!

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