IEP's

by Sharon
(Moscow Idaho)

I have a 4 and half your old with SPD and goes to headstart... I don't know if its just this state or the school district, but you can plainly see she has the condition and has some problems but since she gets along with kids less then half the time they all claim she does not qualify for an IEP.


How can one get one for their child when this district claims there is nothing wrong with her??? She has the OT, counseling, sees a mental health specialist and she has a PSR provider, what more do they need?

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Feb 11, 2009
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OT in Schools
by: Honor student with a Master's Degree in Occupational Therapist from USC

It is really important that parents understand the law and the purpose of special education. A medical diagnosis alone does not indicate that a child needs special education services. Laws that govern special education are specific as to who qualifies and what services are available.

Often medical practitioners can give you a generic diagnosis or prescription, but in terms of educational needs, it is best to have someone qualified in looking at your child in the context of their natural environment (not a clinic or doctor's office), the demands of that natural environment, and a child's ability within that environment, to determine services and needs for your children. Those professionals that actually work with children in their natural environments, are up to date with the law, up to date with best practice models as indicated by their national professional associations (ie AOTA), and up to date with evidence-based practice are your best bet.

Do not underestimate your school-based OT's. Many graduate from top universities and do not make recommendations to earn money in their private clinics and practices. They actually look at your child and use an occupational performance approach. Looking at small sub-skills alone does not define anyone and should not govern a label. I hope this helps you all in your journey.

Jan 25, 2009
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Word from the wise
by: Anonymous

Check the rules on IDEA - federal requirements to meet the needs of students with disabilities, and your state board of education to get the skinny on how they determine who is served. If your daughter is not yet in the elementary school age group (grade K) you may find a lot less interventions available from most districts.

My own personal experience (2 spec needs kids, 6 & 12 yrs) is that if you have a diagnosis - and recommendations from the Dr. making the diagnosis, the school system will general implement them. Don't expect a diagnosis from your school system. Go to a private practice doctor for your own evaluations - as soon as you see there is a problem. If you want to go the route of having the school district pay, you will probably languish with these issues untreated for years. Follow-up with private doctors about therapy and re-evaluations.

Jan 20, 2009
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IEP's
by: Carolyn

Each state has different requirements for Special Ed. In TX a student must meet certain qualifications. If they do not then they can't have an IEP. I would check into seeing exactly why he didn't qualify. After you have a better understanding why they didn't qualify him then you can try to see what you can do to have him qualify.

Sometimes it just takes a Dr. or other specialist filling out paperwork and sending it into the school district. Other times the school will require that they send their own "expert" out to test your child.

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