Is SPD always a problem?

I have a 3 year old who I think has many of the symptoms of SPD - of the hyposensitive variety. We have commented from a very young age that he does not seem to feel pain, and this really does appear to be the case. He has quite severe excema particularly on his hands, but this doesn't seem to bother him at all, even at the point of being infected and weeping.


He recently had his preschool shots, which he watched with interest and afterwards described as "a bit spiky". No tears or distress at all. He is constantly moving, jumping, bouncing, hitting himself and others, running into things/people for fun... Hitting and pushing behaviour towards others (mostly his brother who fortunately is very tolerant) is not done aggressively or out of anger, almost affectionately!

He loves big slides, swings, spinning round and being thrown in the air. He puts everything in his mouth, food and non food. He will happily eat spicy curry, and has been known to eat egg shell. His favourite activities at nursery are sand and playdoh and he loves anything messy.

On the other hand, none of this seems to be causing him any problems as yet. He is a happy sociable otherwise normal child with very good communication skills. I guess there may well be issues when he gets into school and needs to sit still for long periods of time. I do not think he has attention issues, he can sit and listen to a story or concentrate on drawing etc for an appropriate period of time if interested.

So my question I guess is whether there would be any merit in pursuing a diagnosis or treatment? Is this something which can exist without causing difficulties, or is an early intervention always helpful?

Comments for Is SPD always a problem?

Average Rating starstarstarstarstar

Click here to add your own comments

Jun 22, 2009
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Thanks!
by: Anonymous

Thanks for your replies, which have pretty much confirmed my views. I don't think it is a major issue at the moment, but I do find it helpful to look at eg this site for ideas on ways to stimulate him appropriately. I have found myself talking to him about things which are OK to put in his mouth rather than just telling him to take whatever it is out, and being more sympathetic to his requests to rub his back at bedtime for example.

Currently at his nursery they do plenty of running/ jumping/ sand/ water play etc as part of the day, so it does not become a problem. This will not always be the case as he progresses up the school, so if we can have strategies in place to help him manage this, hopefully we can avoid major problems developing. Whether this is helping him find appropriate things to put in his mouth, or giving him 10 minutes jumping time on a trampoline before and after school these are easily achievable things which could be a big help to him going forward.

Thanks again!

Jun 18, 2009
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Treat it by directing it
by: Kim Sullivan

It sounds like your child will need your direction in appropriately getting his sensory needs met. An OT may offer great ideas. This site has so many wonderful suggestions as well. I find that climbing on a playground or rock wall helps settle mine. Also, swimming, pulling/pushing a wagon with another child, jumping jacks, etc. will help. The school he attends gives him a morning and afternoon break of about 10 minutes for these activities and it really helps. Good luck!

Jun 18, 2009
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
sometimes kids will be kids
by: Anonymous

I just would watch and keep your eye on this site. Kiddos do crazy things and learning and growing. Some symptoms you describe wouldn't alarm me, just check with others and maybe your dr. but relax he's little. Just a mom of 3, one with SPD. Not a pro here

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to The SPD Q & A.