Isn't 15 months too young?

by Heather
(Pennsylvania)

My daughter is 15 months old and she has qualified for Early Intervention services. They have 'labeled" her with a sensory processing disorder and due to this, a fine motor planning and oral motor planning. Anytime I google it, it takes me towards autism. She is very interactive and engaging and loves to please. Her receptive language is ahead of her age. She responds to her name and smiles at others, etc. I do not know if that is the issue. But she certainly has trouble learning tasks and "figuring it all out". She "just" started poking with her index finger this month (not pointing yet). She just started giving and putting a ball in a box (and not every time). She never babbled as a baby - just started babbling a little bit this month. So she is coming along, but I do agree that there is a motor planning issue. But how do I get more information on that without having to hear about autism?


Also, her OT started talking about a sensory diet, but how do you "reason" with a 15 month old? She won't do what she doesn't want to do and then she avoids the situation. Do kids "grow out of this" as they mature? Will she eventually figure it out on her own?

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commenting on posts
by: Anonymous

Just to comment on some of your posts, she has no aversions to noise, light, etc. She is very adaptive in her schedule. Loves swings, tunnels, riding in the car, getting her diaper changed, being out at restaurants, the bath, the pool, the sliding board, etc. I do not have any of that. She is also a great eater.

The only "sensory" thing that I can see is that she is very visual (easily distracted) and walks on her toes (FYI - I walked on my toes until I was just over 2 years old).

So that is what I am saying. She is engaging, interactive, adaptive, friendly and once she figures something out, she gets it. It just seems to take her a bit longer and the no talking of course. Wanted to clarify because some of the earlier comments were not comforting to me. I am really not worried about autism, although I have started the process of getting her the appointment with the developmental pediatrician. We filled out all the paper work and now we wait 3-4 months for her appt. By then she will be 18-19 months and more at the age where a diagnosis can be made.

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Hello
by: Mary

15 months is NOT too young. My son was just diagnosed with Sensory Integration and I can think back at 13 months when he started showing signs.

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isn't 15 months....
by: Anonymous

Hi Heather,

I have a son 10 yrs old with autism. He started pointing right before 18 months and started talking and trying to get adults attention. (Yet he was a very VERY fussy baby) He had always been aversive to noise..still is. It is a major problem even now. At age 3 he wouldn't try new clothes and new shoes and certainly not a haircut. Now he has outgrown that. He doesn't mind haircuts and will sit for it the whole time. He has come a very long way. The only major issue is speech. He has some though but not to a high level. He is such a good imitator. Monkey see monkey do, that's him.

Now as for your daughter I would try and find a motivating thing she likes either food or toy etc.
Let her play with it then say first swing then elmo or whatever. what she really wants is the toy but you want her to go on the swing. also if it is something like a swing it will become motivating to her. This is called behavior modification. Find something she really likes and see if you can't get her to try and do these Sensory exercises. Good luck! I know some people do not like labels but labels can get the adequate services you need for your child. Your daughter may not seem autistic to you and yet autistic to someone else. Take her to a developmental pediatrician and have them tell you what it is she has. It's nothing to be ashamed of but knowing what will empower you for the years ahead when she still might be struggling in school and you never got a private evaluation done by a developmental ped. I know it's not easy to come to grips with...
Just my 2 cents but you can do whatever you like.

Jane


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by: Anonymous

Heather it is overwhelming at first to hear all of the info that they give but believe me it is better to start getting help now! Just b/c she has SPD doesn't mean she has autism! But most autistic children do have sensory issues so they are often lumped together. Luckily our pediatrician doesn't do that! As far as out growing it, there issues often change, but they usually need help moving past things. Sensory diets are hard and I'm sure at that age they are really tuff, just do what she will b/c every little bit helps! Good luck on your journey!

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